Notebookcheck

Razer Blade Pro 2017 (i7-7820HK, GTX 1080, 4K) Laptop Review

Florian Glaser (translated by Ariana Brodsky), 09/30/2017

Slim at any cost. Razer's Blade Pro is one of the most powerful and yet slimmest gaming laptops in the world. It was to be expected that this combination would lead to high temperatures and loud background noise. Just how bad is it? Our review reveals the answer.

For the original German review, see here.

Upon hearing the word Razer, many computer experts first think of peripheral equipment such as mice and keyboards. But in the last few years, the manufacturer has also devoted itself to the production of laptops. One example is the compact 14-inch Blade, released in April 2017. The device was equipped with a Core i7-7700HQ, a GeForce GTX 1060 and a Full HD display, and received a very good score of 89% in our review.

Those who prefer screens of somewhat more luxurious proportions are in the right place with the 17-inch Blade Pro, which Razer has kindly made available to us. On the German homepage, two different versions are currently listed. We will start with the Full HD model, which – like its 14-inch sibling – is equipped with a Core i7-7700HQ from Intel's Kaby Lake series and a GeForce GTX 1060 from Nvidia's Pascal line with 6 GB of VRAM. The CPU and GPU are supported by 16 GB of DDR4 2400 RAM, a small 256 GB SSD, and a large 2 TB HDD. A matte IPS panel with 120 Hz display technology serves as the display component. The price point: A steep 2400 Euros (~$2800; $2300 for the US model when it is released on October 3rd 2017 - model number RZ09-02202E75-R3U1).

Considering the competition, from our point of view that price seems extremely high. Various laptops with the considerably more powerful GeForce GTX 1070 are on the market at this price. Take a look at the Aorus X7 v7, the HP Omen 17 or the Medion Erazer X7849; all of which appear as comparison devices in our review. Other GTX 1060 laptops are generally significantly cheaper – from Acer's Helios 300 to the MSI GS73VR 7RF, both of which will also accompany us throughout this article. AMD fans with gaming ambitions ought to take a closer look at the recently reviewed Asus GL702ZC.

But back to the Razer Blade Pro, whose 4000-5000 Euro (~$4700-$5900) 4K edition also comes in above the usual price points. Here the manufacturer shows off with a particularly comprehensive range of components. 32 GB of DDR4 2667 RAM is just as admirable as two solid-state drives in RAID 0 – which together produce a hard drive capacity of 512 GB, 1 TB or 2 TB. These drives are complemented by an (optionally overclocked) Core i7-7820HK, which in turn is supported by a GeForce GTX 1080 with 8 GB of GDDR5X VRAM. A glossy IGZO panel is responsible for image display. It runs at only 60 Hz, but supports G-Sync, offers premium color space coverage, and has a resolution of 3840x2610 pixels rather than just 1920x1080. (Note: This device was originally reviewed in Germany. The US versions cost between $4000-$4200, but we were unable to find a version with 2 TB. The model numbers are RZ09-02202E75-R3U1 and RZ09-01663E53-R3U1.)

Our main question was whether the slim gaming laptop's cooling system is in line with the powerful hardware. If so, the purchase price would be to some extent justified. Note: Razer laptops are hard to find in Germany. Currently, the Blade Pro is only available in the online stores notebook.de and amazon.de, as well as from the manufacturer itself.

Model Blade Pro Full HD Blade Pro 4K
Display IPS, 120Hz, matte IGZO, 60Hz, glossy, touch, G-Sync
Graphics card GeForce GTX 1060, 6 GB GDDR5 GeForce GTX 1080, 8 GB GDDR5X
Processor Core i7-7700HQ Core i7-7820HK (optional OC)
RAM 16 GB DDR4-2400, inserted 32 GB DDR4-2667, soldered
Mass storage 256 GB SSD + 2 TB HDD 512 GB to 2 TB SSD-RAID
THX certification no yes
Power supply 165 watts 250 watts
Battery 70 Wh 99 Wh
Price ~2400 Euros ($2800) 4000 to 5000 Euros ($4700-5900)
Razer Blade Pro 2017 (Blade Pro Series)
Graphics adapter
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop) - 8192 MB, Core: 1557 MHz, Memory: 2500 MHz, GDDR5X, ForceWare 382.05
Memory
32768 MB 
, DDR4 2667, on-board, dual-channel
Display
17.3 inch 16:9, 3840 x 2160 pixel 255 PPI, Capacitive, Sharp LQ173D1JW33 (SHP145A), IGZO, UHD, 60 Hz, G-Sync, glossy: yes
Mainboard
Intel CM238
Storage
2x Samsung SSD PM951 MZVLV256HCHP (RAID 0), 512 GB 
, PCIe NVMe
Soundcard
Realtek ALC298 @ Intel Sunrise Point PCH - High Definition Audio Controller
Connections
3 USB 3.0 / 3.1 Gen1, 1 USB 3.1 Gen2, 1 Thunderbolt, 1 HDMI, 1 DisplayPort, 1 Kensington Lock, Audio Connections: 3.5 mm jack (headphone & microphone), Card Reader: SD, SDHC, SDXC
Networking
Killer E2500 Gigabit Ethernet Controller (10/100/1000MBit), Killer Wireless-n/a/ac 1535 Wireless Network Adapter (b/g/n/ac), Bluetooth 4.1
Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 22.5 x 424 x 281 ( = 0.89 x 16.69 x 11.06 in)
Battery
99 Wh, 8700 mAh Lithium-Polymer, 11.4V
Operating System
Microsoft Windows 10 Home 64 Bit
Camera
Webcam: 2.0 MP (FHD)
Additional features
Speakers: Stereo (Dolby Digital Plus Home Theater), Keyboard: Mechanical, Keyboard Light: yes, 250-watt power supply, logo sticker, cleaning cloth, handbook, Killer Performance Suite, Razer Chroma, Razer Synapse, 24 Months Warranty
Weight
3.6 kg ( = 126.99 oz / 7.94 pounds), Power Supply: 686 g ( = 24.2 oz / 1.51 pounds)
Price
4500 EUR

 

Case

The high-quality and extremely elegant case is definitely the Blade Pro's greatest strength. Many manufacturers of gaming laptops opt for cases formed out of bulky plastic, with designs seemingly tailored to 12-year-old kids. Razer, on the other hand, offers a simple and discreet chassis (with the exception of the green logo on the cover). According to the manufacturer, the case is an aluminum unibody.

Even if the dark surfaces quickly show dirt such as dust and fingerprints (the latter being readily visible in our photos), the 17-inch device looks and feels like an exceptionally high-quality device. The exquisite materials are complemented by the impeccable manufacturing quality. Every element merges cleanly into the next. In short: Very few high-end laptops attain to the quality of the Blade Pro. Even though the 17-inch competitors (the MSI GS73VR and the Aorus X7 v7) are also constructed out of metal, they cannot hold a candle to the Razer device.

The same applied to the stability of the case. Most laptops at least betray weak points in their lids, but the Razer notebook proves extraordinarily stable in all aspects. Even under vigorous pressure, both the base unit and the cover resist being bent or pressed inwards almost entirely. There is very little Razer could improve here, except perhaps the hinges. They are alright in principle, but the relatively heavy lid tends to tip over in response to substantial (underground) vibrations. Less intense movements only cause the display to bounce gently.

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Speaking of weight: At 3.6 kg (~8 lbs), despite its slim construction the Blade Pro is not one of the lightest gaming laptops. With the exception of the HP Omen 17 (3.8 kg/~8.4 lb) and the equally heavy Medion Erazer X7849, the slim competition weighs in at lower numbers. We should note, however, that none of the aforementioned laptops offer the graphics performance of the Blade Pro. Nevertheless, the 17-inch device is only suitable for daily transport to a limited extent. The laptop is simply a few hundred grams too heavy for us to feel comfortable hauling it around frequently.

When it comes to size, no one can criticize the Blade Pro. At a case thickness of 22.5 mm (~0.89 inches), very few high-end laptops in the 17-inch category can beat it (ex. the MSI GS73VR). The remaining slim competition measure in at 2.5 to 3.4 cm (~0.98 to ~1.34 inches). Minor flaws notwithstanding: When it comes to the case, Razer has hit a bull's eye – both in terms of quality and appearance.

Size Comparison

Connectivity

The number of ports is in our opinion respectable. Three Type A USB 3.0 ports are just as compulsory on a gaming laptop as an RJ45 port and an HDMI 2.0 port (4K @ 60Hz). These are complemented by a card reader, an opening for a Kensington lock, and a modern Thunderbolt 3 port that also supports USB 3.1 Gen2 and DisplayPort. It is a shame however, that Razer has chosen to forgo a dedicated DisplayPort (which would make connecting to appropriate monitors easier, given that no adapter would be required) and separate audio sockets for headphones and microphones.

Even though the ports are positioned in the middle of the sides of the computer, there is still a reasonable amount of space for moving a mouse around. However, because the back areas lack ventilation slots, Razer certainly could have relocated the ports to the rear. That would have been more practical for gaming, and more comfortable. The back houses the hinges and the fan output; the front is completely free of connections.

left side: DC-in, RJ-45, 2x USB 3.0, 3.5 mm jack
left side: DC-in, RJ-45, 2x USB 3.0, 3.5 mm jack
right side: card reader, Thunderbolt 3, USB 3.0, HDMI 2.0, Kensington lock
right side: card reader, Thunderbolt 3, USB 3.0, HDMI 2.0, Kensington lock

SD Card Reader

The card reader (supports SD, SDHC and SDXC) puzzled us in our tests. In the AS SSD benchmark, which we use to determine the sequential read speeds, it always took a while for the performance to get going. An average of 52 MB/s is a somewhat odd result, given that the card readers generally perform at either USB 2.0 speeds (around 30 MB/s) or else USB 3.0 speeds (around 90 MB/s), as our table demonstrates. The same goes for the transfer test, in which the Blade Pro once again makes itself comfortable in between the competition. The frontrunner proves to be the Aorus X7 v7, which nearly attains to our UHS II card's highest possible speed (max. 260 MB/s).

SDCardreader Transfer Speed
average JPG Copy Test (av. of 3 runs)
Aorus X7 v7
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
196 MB/s ∼100% +292%
Acer Predator Helios 300
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
79 MB/s ∼40% +58%
HP Omen 17-an014ng
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
76 MB/s ∼39% +52%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
76 MB/s ∼39% +52%
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
68.1 MB/s ∼35% +36%
Razer Blade Pro 2017
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
50 MB/s ∼26%
MSI GS73VR 7RF
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
25.9 MB/s ∼13% -48%
maximum AS SSD Seq Read Test (1GB)
Aorus X7 v7
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
247 MB/s ∼100% +375%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
90 MB/s ∼36% +73%
HP Omen 17-an014ng
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
87 MB/s ∼35% +67%
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
86.2 MB/s ∼35% +66%
Acer Predator Helios 300
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
84 MB/s ∼34% +62%
Razer Blade Pro 2017
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
52 MB/s ∼21%
MSI GS73VR 7RF
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
27.1 MB/s ∼11% -48%

Communication

Products from the manufacturer Rivet Networks are responsible for the Blade Pro's communication devices. A Killer E2500 (Gigabit Ethernet controller) and a Killer Wireless n/a/ac 1535 (Wi-Fi adapter) form a combination of choice for many manufacturers of high-end laptops, thanks to its gaming focus and powerful Killer Performance Suite network software. In the wireless range test with our Linksys EA8500 reference router, which we perform at a distance of 1 meter (~3.25 feet), the Blade Pro does quite well. 528 to 671 Mbit/s is on par with the competition. Only the Aorus X7 v7 and the HP Omen 17 sometimes fail to reach over 500 Mbit/s.

Networking
iperf3 Client (receive) TCP 1 m 4M x10
HP Omen 17-an014ng
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7265
702 MBit/s ∼100% +5%
Acer Predator Helios 300
Qualcomm Atheros QCA61x4
696 MBit/s ∼99% +4%
Razer Blade Pro 2017
Killer Wireless-n/a/ac 1535 Wireless Network Adapter
671 MBit/s ∼96%
MSI GS73VR 7RF
Killer Wireless-n/a/ac 1535 Wireless Network Adapter
640 MBit/s ∼91% -5%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Realtek 8822BE Wireless LAN 802.11ac PCI-E NIC
633 MBit/s ∼90% -6%
Aorus X7 v7
Killer Wireless-n/a/ac 1535 Wireless Network Adapter
485 MBit/s ∼69% -28%
iperf3 Client (transmit) TCP 1 m 4M x10
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Realtek 8822BE Wireless LAN 802.11ac PCI-E NIC
613 MBit/s ∼100% +16%
MSI GS73VR 7RF
Killer Wireless-n/a/ac 1535 Wireless Network Adapter
563 MBit/s ∼92% +7%
Acer Predator Helios 300
Qualcomm Atheros QCA61x4
545 MBit/s ∼89% +3%
Razer Blade Pro 2017
Killer Wireless-n/a/ac 1535 Wireless Network Adapter
528 MBit/s ∼86%
Aorus X7 v7
Killer Wireless-n/a/ac 1535 Wireless Network Adapter
498 MBit/s ∼81% -6%
HP Omen 17-an014ng
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7265
443 MBit/s ∼72% -16%

Accessories

The accessories that come with the Blade Pro include a cleaning cloth, a handbook, several logo stickers, and the mandatory power supply. Razer has chosen a 250-watt model here (330 watts is more common for GTX 1080 laptops) that weighs just under 0.7 kg (~1.5 lb). At a thickness of 1.9 cm (~0.75 inches; 2.8 cm or 1.1 inches including the protrusion for the power cord), it is surprisingly slim. A recovery disc and driver DVD would be sought in vain. System recovery is executed through the hard drive (press F9 during the boot process).

Maintenance

The Blade Pro's maintenance options and upgradability prove mediocre. Because there is no special hatch, the bottom of the device must be completely removed to gain access to its inner workings. The bottom is attached with 12 Torx screws and 2 Phillips screws. Caution: The Phillips screws are hidden behind two small removable plates on the rubber strips that run the length of the bottom of the device.

After the user has gone to the painstaking effort of removing the bottom of the case, the 17-inch laptop's components are finally exposed. That is, some of the hardware is within reach – the graphics card and processor are located on top of the motherboard, which is inconvenient for users who want to have full control. The CPU and GPU cannot be switched out in any case, as they are both soldered on. This is common for today's laptops. But Razer does not stop there: the RAM is also affixed to the motherboard. This is a bad idea both for buyers and the environment (buzzword: throw-away product). Because there are no normal DDR4 slots, if the RAM fails the whole motherboard would need to be replaced. At least the user can switch out the solid-state drives and/or the wireless module if desired. Two fans with matching fins and several heat pipes are responsible for cooling the laptop. 

Software

In order to provide gamers with sufficient tuning, monitoring and settings options, the manufacturer has installed a program called Razer Synapse. Annoyingly, the program requires registration. Similar software installed on the Blade Pro's competitors does not require registration. Whether it be an MSI laptop with Dragon Center, an Asus laptop with Gaming Center, an Acer laptop with PredatorSense, or a Gigabyte laptop with Smart Manager – none of them require registration. Furthermore, Razer Synapse is not clearly laid out and could certainly be structured better. The fan speed and the performance controls, for example, are located under Keyboard/Charging Status – very illogical. Purely in terms of the number of features, Razer cannot be criticized – as the multitude of options in our screenshots makes clear.

BIOS

The BIOS settings are somewhat more comprehensive than on most gaming laptops, but technology fans will not be particularly excited by them. The following photos show the most important main menus.

Warranty

When it comes to the Blade Pro's warranty period, we encountered conflicting information. While notebook.de mentions a duration of 12 months, amazon.de claims 24 months.

Input Devices

Keyboard

In addition to the ultra slim case, on first glance the Blade Pro's input devices are also unusual. In keeping with the current trend, Razer has integrated a mechanical keyboard. Although MSI has chosen even better models for their GT75VR and especially their GT83VR, the Blade Pro blows classic keyboards out of the water. After you have had a mechanical version under your fingers, conventional keyboards suddenly feel very antiquated and spongy – much like the switch from an HDD to an SSD. The 17-inch device score points for its delightfully well-defined and precise feedback that makes it possible to type extremely fast. The click point and response to the touch are indubitably sublime. Thanks to the very short key travel – for a mechanical keyboard, anyway – Razer has even positioned the keyboard in the usual spot. Other competitors in the slim market, such as the Asus ROG Zephyrus and the Acer Triton 700, have relocated the keyboard further down. As a result, those laptops lack a palm rest.

We were not quite as content with the layout (our test device was a US model). Because the touchpad is positioned opposite the keyboard, it is somewhat difficult to orient yourself on the right-hand side of the keyboard. Especially when using the arrows, we often hit the keyboard in the wrong place – not least because of the two Fn keys. In principle, all the keys are of an ample size. Even the keys in the F-row – often neglected on laptops – are afforded 15 x 15 mm (0.59 inches). Razer also deserves praise for the practical multimedia keys (forward, back, play/pause, mute), which sit directly above the touchpad and – depending on the settings – are separated by either a scroll or a volume wheel.

Those for whom the words "mechanical keyboard" equate with "irritating typing sounds" can breathe easy. Yes, compared to standard models, the keyboard is clearly audible – but many mechanical keyboards are significantly louder. On the other hand, the labeling and visibility of the keys' secondary functions prove suboptimal. The labels are stamped in a pale gray and lack backlighting.

mechanical keyboard...
mechanical keyboard...
...with RGB backlighting
...with RGB backlighting

Touchpad

As previously mentioned, Razer has chosen to position the touchpad to the right of the keyboard, rather than underneath it (à la Asus GX501). Ergonomically, this is certainly not a bad solution, and it gives the laptop a unique look with the wide, uninterrupted palm rest. The combination of the smooth surface and luxurious size (10.5 x 8.5 cm/~4 x 3.4 inches) make use of the touchpad comfortably fluid, and enable the user to move the pointer across large images without readjusting the position of his or her fingers. Our only criticizm is that the pad could function a bit more accurately. Even so, the multi-touch support works flawlessly. Zooming and scrolling across websites and documents with 2 finger gestures is a comfortable experience.

In general, the ClickPad is a very good specimen of its kind. Because the pad lacks dedicated mouse buttons, right and left clicks are executed by pressing on the lower portion of its surface. Due to its stability, this functions better than on many other laptops. The stylish RGB backlighting is one of the Blade Pro's great strengths. It sets off both the keyboard and the (framed) touchpad even in total darkness. With its various colors and modes, an appropriate setting should be available for any user.

Display

The Sharp LQ173D1JW33 4K panel leaves us with mixed feelings. While the black value (0.2 cd/m²) and contrast (1150:1) match the laptop's high price, at around 207 cd/m², the luminosity is disappointingly low. The brightness level is generally good enough for indoor use, but outdoors the UHD edition of the Blade Pro is no fun. Even in the shade, the display content is hardly visible.

This has a lot to do with the highly reflective surface. Razer's choice of a glossy rather than a matte surface (unlike the Full HD model) has to do with the display's capacitive touch capabilities. Whether touch functionality is sensible on a 17-inch gaming notebook is a question each reader must answer for themselves. Personally, the author considers the touchscreen unnecessary and would certainly prefer a matte display surface.

208
cd/m²
207
cd/m²
192
cd/m²
222
cd/m²
230
cd/m²
198
cd/m²
199
cd/m²
209
cd/m²
198
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
X-Rite i1Pro 2
Maximum: 230 cd/m² Average: 207 cd/m² Minimum: 12 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 83 %
Center on Battery: 230 cd/m²
Contrast: 1150:1 (Black: 0.2 cd/m²)
ΔE Color 5.62 | 0.8-23.34 Ø6.4
ΔE Greyscale 4.54 | 0.64-98 Ø6.7
100% sRGB (Argyll) 88% AdobeRGB 1998 (Argyll)
Gamma: 2.36
Razer Blade Pro 2017
Sharp LQ173D1JW33 (SHP145A), 3840x2160, 17.3
Aorus X7 v7
AU Optronics B173QTN01.4 (AUO1496), 2560x1440, 17.3
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
LP173WF4-SPD1, 1920x1080, 17.3
HP Omen 17-an014ng
AUO149D, 1920x1080, 17.3
MSI GS73VR 7RF
AU Optronics AUO109B, 3840x2160, 17.3
Acer Predator Helios 300
LG LP173WF4-SPF5 (LGD056D), 1920x1080, 17.3
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
LG Philips LP173WF4-SPF5 (LGD04E8), 1920x1080, 17.3
Response Times
73%
46%
24%
35%
19355%
19839%
Response Time Grey 50% / Grey 80% *
60.8 (28.8, 32)
24 (14, 10)
61%
29 (12, 17)
52%
45.2 (20.8, 24.4)
26%
38 (19.6, 18.4)
37%
36 (18, 18)
41%
39.2 (20.4, 18.8)
36%
Response Time Black / White *
38.4 (22, 16.4)
6 (4, 2)
84%
23 (7, 16)
40%
30.4 (16.4, 14)
21%
26 (16, 10)
32%
20 (8.4, 11.6)
48%
22.8 (11.2, 11.6)
41%
PWM Frequency
204.9 (20)
119000 (85)
57977%
122000 (90)
59441%
Screen
-20%
-7%
3%
2%
3%
9%
Brightness middle
230
375
63%
390
70%
314
37%
371.1
61%
384
67%
379
65%
Brightness
207
353
71%
355
71%
309
49%
343
66%
373
80%
354
71%
Brightness Distribution
83
85
2%
79
-5%
88
6%
86
4%
93
12%
89
7%
Black Level *
0.2
0.58
-190%
0.39
-95%
0.34
-70%
0.42
-110%
0.35
-75%
0.31
-55%
Contrast
1150
647
-44%
1000
-13%
924
-20%
884
-23%
1097
-5%
1223
6%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 *
5.62
6.06
-8%
5.9
-5%
3.19
43%
4.5
20%
4.81
14%
4.32
23%
Greyscale DeltaE2000 *
4.54
5.68
-25%
6.17
-36%
3.49
23%
3.1
32%
5.33
-17%
4
12%
Gamma
2.36 102%
2.3 104%
2.24 107%
2.34 103%
2.17 111%
2.45 98%
2.47 97%
CCT
6625 98%
7998 81%
6955 93%
7261 90%
7120 91%
7137 91%
6984 93%
Color Space (Percent of AdobeRGB 1998)
88
57
-35%
55
-37%
60
-32%
61
-31%
56
-36%
56
-36%
Color Space (Percent of sRGB)
100
87
-13%
84
-16%
93
-7%
97
-3%
86
-14%
85
-15%
Total Average (Program / Settings)
27% / -3%
20% / 2%
14% / 7%
19% / 8%
9679% / 4841%
9924% / 4966%

* ... smaller is better

The fact that the display is prone to glaring reflections is not the only thing that bothers us. It also has significant halation along the lower rim that is separated by conspicuous dark spots (see photos). We hope this is an isolated case. As a buyer, after the first start-up we absolutely would have packed up the laptop and sent it back, given that the irregular lighting does not only impact black backgrounds – the effect is also obtrusive for other colors.

A significant advantage of the IGZO panel is the excellent color space coverage. Rather than the 60% of the Adobe RGB color space that most gaming laptops cover, believe it or not, the Blade Pro covers 88% of the Adobe RGB color space (and 100% of the sRGB). In the gaming market, only the AUO Optronics B173ZAN01.0 can compete with these numbers. This panel is available in the Acer Predator 17 and the Schenker XMG U727 for example, and also has a resolution of 3840x2160 pixels. But because of its glossy surface, colors on the Blade Pro look even more intense and vibrant.

halation...
halation...
...and dark spots
...and dark spots
viewing angles
viewing angles
glossy display...
glossy display...
...with glaring reflections
...with glaring reflections
subpixels
subpixels

Professional users certainly ought to calibrate the display, given that it is not very accurate in factory default. According to our measurements, the DeltaE 2000 deviations are 4.54 (grayscale) and 5.62 (ColorChecker). But have no fear: With the right device, the numbers drop to under 1 – an excellent result. (A link to the ICC file is located further above.) 

CalMAN: grayscale
CalMAN: grayscale
CalMAN: grayscale (calibrated)
CalMAN: grayscale (calibrated)
CalMAN: color saturation
CalMAN: color saturation
CalMAN: color saturation (calibrated)
CalMAN: color saturation (calibrated)
CalMAN: ColorChecker
CalMAN: ColorChecker
CalMAN: ColorChecker (calibrated)
CalMAN: ColorChecker (calibrated)
Razer Blade Pro vs. sRGB (100%)
Razer Blade Pro vs. sRGB (100%)
Razer Blade Pro vs. AdobeRGB (88%)
Razer Blade Pro vs. AdobeRGB (88%)

The laptop receives penalty points for the display's mediocre reaction times. 38.4 ms black-to-black and 60.8 ms gray-to-gray are longer than most IPS panels. Compared to quick TN panels like the N173HHE-G32 (MSI GT73VR 7RF), the Blade pro has no chance. Even so, we did not observe any streaking or the like in our benchmarks. Those with sensitive eyes still ought to think twice before purchasing this device, in part because up to a brightness level of 20%, the display flickers at around 205 Hz.

On the other hand, gaming fans will be pleased about the support for Nvidia's G-Sync technology. This balances the frame rate with the frequency of the display, which creates a smoother image without screen tearing. It also prevents coil whining at higher frame rates. For our tests, G-Sync was always inactive.

Display Response Times

Display response times show how fast the screen is able to change from one color to the next. Slow response times can lead to afterimages and can cause moving objects to appear blurry (ghosting). Gamers of fast-paced 3D titles should pay special attention to fast response times.
       Response Time Black to White
38.4 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 22 ms rise
↘ 16.4 ms fall
The screen shows slow response rates in our tests and will be unsatisfactory for gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.8 (minimum) to 240 (maximum) ms. » 95 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is worse than the average of all tested devices (26.5 ms).
       Response Time 50% Grey to 80% Grey
60.8 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 28.8 ms rise
↘ 32 ms fall
The screen shows slow response rates in our tests and will be unsatisfactory for gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.9 (minimum) to 636 (maximum) ms. » 95 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is worse than the average of all tested devices (42.3 ms).

Screen Flickering / PWM (Pulse-Width Modulation)

To dim the screen, some notebooks will simply cycle the backlight on and off in rapid succession - a method called Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) . This cycling frequency should ideally be undetectable to the human eye. If said frequency is too low, users with sensitive eyes may experience strain or headaches or even notice the flickering altogether.
Screen flickering / PWM detected 204.9 Hz20 % brightness setting

The display backlight flickers at 204.9 Hz (Likely utilizing PWM) Flickering detected at a brightness setting of 20 % and below. There should be no flickering or PWM above this brightness setting.

The frequency of 204.9 Hz is relatively low, so sensitive users will likely notice flickering and experience eyestrain at the stated brightness setting and below.

In comparison: 54 % of all tested devices do not use PWM to dim the display. If PWM was detected, an average of 9024 (minimum: 43 - maximum: 142900) Hz was measured.

Performance

It is simply astonishing how much manufacturers can squeeze into a slim laptop chassis these days. Thanks to M.2 technology, more than one SSD is not a problem. The amount of RAM and the performance power of both CPU and GPU need not be inferior to what is found in a classic tower PC.

Processor

Depending on the graphics card and the display, the Blade Pro is equipped with either a Core i7-7700HQ (2.8-3.8 GHz, 6 MB L3 cache) or a Core i7-7820HK (2.9-3.9 GHz, 8 MB L3 cache). With the free multiplier, overclocking the latter CPU is especially simple.

single-core rendering
single-core rendering
multi-core rendering
multi-core rendering
GPU load
GPU load

The performance of the two quad-core CPUs – both of which can process eight threads in parallel with Hyperthreading – is in practice very similar. In the Cinebench R15 and Cinebench R11.5 benchmarks, the Core i7-7820HK leads by a maximum of 10%.

Cinebench R15
CPU Single 64Bit
Aorus X7 v7
Intel Core i7-7820HK
166 Points ∼100% +5%
MSI GS73VR 7RF
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
160 Points ∼96% +1%
Acer Predator Helios 300
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
159 Points ∼96% +1%
Razer Blade Pro 2017
Intel Core i7-7820HK
158 Points ∼95%
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
Intel Core i7-6820HK
154 Points ∼93% -3%
HP Omen 17-an014ng
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
144 Points ∼87% -9%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
AMD Ryzen 7 1700
144 Points ∼87% -9%
CPU Multi 64Bit
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
AMD Ryzen 7 1700
1408 Points ∼100% +83%
Aorus X7 v7
Intel Core i7-7820HK
793 Points ∼56% +3%
Razer Blade Pro 2017
Intel Core i7-7820HK
771 Points ∼55%
Acer Predator Helios 300
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
735 Points ∼52% -5%
HP Omen 17-an014ng
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
735 Points ∼52% -5%
MSI GS73VR 7RF
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
732 Points ∼52% -5%
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
Intel Core i7-6820HK
704 Points ∼50% -9%
Cinebench R11.5
CPU Single 64Bit
Aorus X7 v7
Intel Core i7-7820HK
1.85 Points ∼100% +2%
MSI GS73VR 7RF
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
1.82 Points ∼98% +1%
Razer Blade Pro 2017
Intel Core i7-7820HK
1.81 Points ∼98%
Acer Predator Helios 300
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
1.81 Points ∼98% 0%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
AMD Ryzen 7 1700
1.63 Points ∼88% -10%
CPU Multi 64Bit
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
AMD Ryzen 7 1700
15.76 Points ∼100% +88%
Aorus X7 v7
Intel Core i7-7820HK
8.71 Points ∼55% +4%
Razer Blade Pro 2017
Intel Core i7-7820HK
8.39 Points ∼53%
MSI GS73VR 7RF
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
8.18 Points ∼52% -3%
Acer Predator Helios 300
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
8.14 Points ∼52% -3%

The Turbo Boost feature, i.e. automatic overclocking, is used to the fullest possible extent. Depending on the level of load, the Kaby Lake CPU reaches between 2.5 GHz (multi-core) and 3.9 GHz (single-core).

Cinebench R11.5 CPU Single 64Bit
1.81 Points
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Multi 64Bit
8.39 Points
Cinebench R15 CPU Single 64Bit
158 Points
Cinebench R15 CPU Multi 64Bit
771 Points
Help

We used Cinebench R15 to test whether this good level of performance continues over a longer period. After 50 repetitions, the results were equally good.

0102030405060708090100110120130140150160170180190200210220230240250260270280290300310320330340350360370380390400410420430440450460470480490500510520530540550560570580590600610620630640650660670680690700710720730740750760770Tooltip
Cinebench R15 CPU Multi 64 Bit

System Performance

As we recently observed while testing the Acer Triton 700, the PCMark benchmarks have some difficulties with RAID systems. As a result, the laptop's significant deficit in the PCMark 8 Work test and its weak score in PCMark 10 are not truly informative or worthy of comparison. We had no problems with the PCMark 8 Home test. Here the Blade Pro does well, landing third place behind the HP Omen 17 and the Acer Helios 300. In everyday use, the solid-state drives perform particularly well; both the boot procedure and the load times benefit significantly.

PCMark 8
Work Score Accelerated v2
HP Omen 17-an014ng
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
5289 Points ∼100% +113%
Acer Predator Helios 300
GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Intel SSD 600p SSDPEKKW512G7
5116 Points ∼97% +106%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700, SanDisk SD8SN8U256G1002
5110 Points ∼97% +106%
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN512HCJH
5104 Points ∼97% +105%
MSI GS73VR 7RF
GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Samsung SM961 MZVKW512HMJP m.2 PCI-e
4259 Points ∼81% +71%
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK, 2x Samsung SSD PM951 MZVLV256HCHP (RAID 0)
2486 Points ∼47%
Home Score Accelerated v2
HP Omen 17-an014ng
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
4989 Points ∼100% +10%
Acer Predator Helios 300
GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Intel SSD 600p SSDPEKKW512G7
4874 Points ∼98% +8%
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK, 2x Samsung SSD PM951 MZVLV256HCHP (RAID 0)
4531 Points ∼91%
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN512HCJH
4214 Points ∼84% -7%
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 6820HK, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN512HCJH
4214 Points ∼84% -7%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700, SanDisk SD8SN8U256G1002
4173 Points ∼84% -8%
MSI GS73VR 7RF
GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Samsung SM961 MZVKW512HMJP m.2 PCI-e
3581 Points ∼72% -21%
PCMark 10 - Score
HP Omen 17-an014ng
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
5137 Points ∼100% +29%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700, SanDisk SD8SN8U256G1002
5084 Points ∼99% +27%
Acer Predator Helios 300
GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ, Intel SSD 600p SSDPEKKW512G7
4861 Points ∼95% +22%
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK, 2x Samsung SSD PM951 MZVLV256HCHP (RAID 0)
3991 Points ∼78%
PCMark 8 Home Score Accelerated v2
4531 points
PCMark 8 Work Score Accelerated v2
2486 points
Help

Storage Solution

In our test model, Razer combines two NVMe SSDs from Samsung (MZVLV256HCHP a.k.a. PM951) in a RAID 0 system. Both 256 GB M.2 drives score points in the storage benchmarks for very good read speeds. On the other hand, in some cases the write speeds come in behind the competition. To some extent, the computer fails to take full advantage of the PCIe technology that eliminates the 500 MB limit on SATA III SSDs. Some gaming laptops reach higher speeds with just one SSD. The Aorus X7 v7's Samsung SM961 attains to speeds almost twice as high in the sequential write test. Note: Because the 4K version of the Blade Pro lacks a 2.5-inch bay, users will have to be satisfied with the two M.2 slots.

Razer Blade Pro 2017
2x Samsung SSD PM951 MZVLV256HCHP (RAID 0)
Aorus X7 v7
Samsung SM961 MZVPW256HEGL
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN512HCJH
HP Omen 17-an014ng
Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
MSI GS73VR 7RF
Samsung SM961 MZVKW512HMJP m.2 PCI-e
Acer Predator Helios 300
Intel SSD 600p SSDPEKKW512G7
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
SanDisk SD8SN8U256G1002
AS SSD
35%
-47%
-31%
-33%
-24%
-48%
Score Total
2715
3668
35%
928
-66%
2205
-19%
1852
-32%
1588
-42%
842
-69%
Score Write
676
1021
51%
294
-57%
161
-76%
104
-85%
588
-13%
265
-61%
Score Read
1414
1803
28%
412
-71%
1414
0%
1232
-13%
690
-51%
372
-74%
4K Write
104.44
123.31
18%
77.07
-26%
1.26
-99%
1.6
-98%
111.34
7%
80.66
-23%
4K Read
37.57
48.35
29%
35.7
-5%
47.62
27%
47.9
27%
29.02
-23%
35.64
-5%
Seq Write
587.97
1066.75
81%
470.04
-20%
365.55
-38%
349.6
-41%
552.35
-6%
468.3
-20%
Seq Read
2599.35
2690
3%
493.94
-81%
2373.98
-9%
2826.3
9%
1557.85
-40%
431.57
-83%
2x Samsung SSD PM951 MZVLV256HCHP (RAID 0)
CDM 5 Read Seq Q32T1: 2228 MB/s
CDM 5 Write Seq Q32T1: 620.4 MB/s
CDM 5 Read 4K Q32T1: 627.1 MB/s
CDM 5 Write 4K Q32T1: 554.3 MB/s
CDM 5 Read Seq: 2446 MB/s
CDM 5 Write Seq: 617.8 MB/s
CDM 5 Read 4K: 40.68 MB/s
CDM 5 Write 4K: 124 MB/s

Graphics Card

Because the new edition of the Blade Pro was released before the launch of Nvidia's Max-Q design, the 17-inch laptop is equipped with a standard GTX 1060 or GTX 1080. This has its advantages and disadvantages. While laptops with Max-Q tend to remain quieter and use less energy, those who want lots of performance power are still better off with the "normal" Pascal chips. Razer has chosen display resolutions that match the power of the respective graphics accelerators. 3840x2160 pixels would overtax a GTX 1060 in almost every game; thus 1920x1080 is the better choice there. The GeForce GTX 1080 is certainly capable of running today's titles at higher settings in 4K.

No wonder: Nvidia's most powerful laptop chip offers 2560 shader units and 8 GB of GDDR5X video memory, connected though a 256-bit interface. The clock rates are pretty impressive too. At around 1670 MHz in 3D mode, the core's speed falls within Nvidia's guaranteed turbo spectrum (1557-1734 MHz). In optimal circumstances, the computer even reaches up to 1873 MHz (source: the GPU-Z tool's render test).

3DMark
2560x1440 Time Spy Graphics
Razer Blade Pro 2017
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop)
6380 Points ∼100%
Aorus X7 v7
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
5743 Points ∼90% -10%
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
5241 Points ∼82% -18%
Acer Predator Helios 300
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop)
3790 Points ∼59% -41%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
AMD Radeon RX 580 (Laptop)
3440 Points ∼54% -46%
1920x1080 Fire Strike Graphics
Razer Blade Pro 2017
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop)
18879 Points ∼100%
Aorus X7 v7
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
17433 Points ∼92% -8%
HP Omen 17-an014ng
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
17289 Points ∼92% -8%
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
16046 Points ∼85% -15%
Acer Predator Helios 300
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop)
12009 Points ∼64% -36%
MSI GS73VR 7RF
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop)
11384 Points ∼60% -40%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
AMD Radeon RX 580 (Laptop)
11010 Points ∼58% -42%
3DMark 11 - 1280x720 Performance GPU
Razer Blade Pro 2017
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop)
24868 Points ∼100%
Aorus X7 v7
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
22190 Points ∼89% -11%
HP Omen 17-an014ng
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
21918 Points ∼88% -12%
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
21172 Points ∼85% -15%
Acer Predator Helios 300
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop)
15607 Points ∼63% -37%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
AMD Radeon RX 580 (Laptop)
15264 Points ∼61% -39%
MSI GS73VR 7RF
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop)
14666 Points ∼59% -41%

It thus surprised us even more that the Blade Pro falls behind other GTX 1080 laptops in the GPU benchmarks, sometimes by a margin of 10-20% – for no obvious reason. The overall performance tends to come in at the level of the GTX 1080 Max-Q, which hardly achieves better results than the substantially cheaper GTX 1070. Thus the Razer Blade Pro's advantage over the Aorus X7 v7 and the HP Omen 17 in the 3DMark 13 and 3DMark 11 benchmarks only comes to around 10%. GTX 1060 laptops, on the other hand, are significantly slower (60-70% of our test device's speed). At first we singled out the power supply as the culprit, given that it is barely large enough for a GTX 1080 card. But even under full load, the Razer Blade Pro consumes a maximum of 258 watts (212 watts @ “The Witcher 3”). Considering the estimated efficiency rate, this lies well within the specifications. Because the driver (ForceWare 382.05) did not give us any trouble and the GPU temperature did not reach a critical level, the reason for the laptop's relatively poor performance in the graphics tests remains a mystery. 

Update September 28 2017: We have been told that Razer has lowered the GTX 1080's TDP, which would explain its inferior performance.

The aforementioned issue notwithstanding, Razer's Blade Pro is one of the fastest slim 17-inch gaming laptops on the market. Only the Aorus X7 DT v7, which is also equipped with a GTX 1080 and currently in the midst of our review process, can challenge the Blade Pro with its case thickness of under 3 cm (~1.2 inches). Given their considerably bulkier cases, most high-end notebooks are hardly worthy of comparison.

3DMark 11 Performance
18286 points
3DMark Ice Storm Standard Score
147542 points
3DMark Cloud Gate Standard Score
28270 points
3DMark Fire Strike Score
14825 points
3DMark Time Spy Score
5989 points
Help

As with the CPU, we also analyzed the GPU's performance over a prolonged period. The 17-inch laptop had no problem running 60 minutes of “The Witcher 3” at 1920x1080 pixels and maximum detail settings. Small variations in the frame rate are typical, due to fluctuating clock speeds and the day and night cycles in the game. We were only able to make the Blade Pro throttle (drop below the base clock speed) under full load with the FurMark and Prime95 tools running simultaneously. Such a scenario is hardly relevant in practical, everyday use. 

0123456789101112131415161718192021222324252627282930313233343536373839404142434445464748495051525354555657585960616263646566Tooltip
The Witcher 3 ultra

Gaming Performance

As long as the user is prepared to forgo the Ultra preset when using the display's native resolution, most games run smoothly, even at 3840x2160 pixels (>40 FPS). If a game does stutter, generally it is because the developer has, shall we say, room to optimize. Here we feel compelled to name the hyped multi-player games “PUBG” and “Ark Survival Evolved”, both of which require a reduction in both detail settings and resolution.

The Witcher 3
3840x2160 High Graphics & Postprocessing (Nvidia HairWorks Off)
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
46.7 fps ∼100%
Acer Predator Helios 300
GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ
26.1 (min: 23, max: 29) fps ∼56% -44%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700
23.8 (min: 21) fps ∼51% -49%
1920x1080 Ultra Graphics & Postprocessing (HBAO+)
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
64.9 fps ∼100%
Aorus X7 v7
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7820HK
61.3 fps ∼94% -6%
HP Omen 17-an014ng
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7700HQ
58 fps ∼89% -11%
MSI GS73VR 7RF
GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ
41 fps ∼63% -37%
Acer Predator Helios 300
GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ
38.9 (min: 31, max: 45) fps ∼60% -40%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700
37.4 (min: 31) fps ∼58% -42%
Resident Evil 7
3840x2160 High / On AA:FXAA+T
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
52 fps ∼100%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700
30.6 (min: 23) fps ∼59% -41%
1920x1080 Very High / On AA:FXAA+T
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
152 fps ∼100%
Aorus X7 v7
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7820HK
133.8 fps ∼88% -12%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700
99.4 (min: 77) fps ∼65% -35%
For Honor
3840x2160 High Preset AA:T AF:8x
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
52.9 fps ∼100%
Acer Predator Helios 300
GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ
30.2 (min: 24.3, max: 36) fps ∼57% -43%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700
26.7 (min: 21) fps ∼50% -50%
1920x1080 Extreme Preset AA:T AF:16x
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
122 fps ∼100%
Acer Predator Helios 300
GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ
72.3 (min: 54.3, max: 99.8) fps ∼59% -41%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700
68.2 (min: 51) fps ∼56% -44%
Ghost Recon Wildlands
3840x2160 Very High Preset AA:T AF:8x
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
37.1 fps ∼100%
Acer Predator Helios 300
GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ
25.3 (min: 17.7, max: 30.5) fps ∼68% -32%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700
21.3 (min: 14) fps ∼57% -43%
1920x1080 Ultra Preset AA:T AF:16x
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
55.4 fps ∼100%
Acer Predator Helios 300
GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 7700HQ
38.4 (min: 33.5, max: 42.9) fps ∼69% -31%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700
26.7 (min: 23) fps ∼48% -52%
Prey
3840x2160 High Preset AA:2TX SM AF:8x
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
61.6 fps ∼100%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700
28.4 (min: 24) fps ∼46% -54%
1920x1080 Very High Preset AA:2TX SM AF:16x
Aorus X7 v7
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7820HK
139 fps ∼100% +5%
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
133 fps ∼96%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700
87.2 (min: 60) fps ∼63% -34%
Rocket League
3840x2160 High Quality AA:High FX
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
103 fps ∼100%
1920x1080 High Quality AA:High FX
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
230 fps ∼100%
Aorus X7 v7
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7820HK
219.5 fps ∼95% -5%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700
168 (min: 138) fps ∼73% -27%
Dirt 4
3840x2160 Ultra Preset AF:16x
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
59 fps ∼100%
1920x1080 Ultra Preset AA:4xMS AF:16x
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
91.4 fps ∼100%
Aorus X7 v7
GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 7820HK
82.2 fps ∼90% -10%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700
57.7 (min: 50) fps ∼63% -37%
F1 2017
3840x2160 Ultra High Preset AA:T AF:16x
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
51 fps ∼100%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700
27 (min: 24) fps ∼53% -47%
1920x1080 Ultra High Preset AA:T AF:16x
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
100 fps ∼100%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700
63 (min: 55) fps ∼63% -37%
Ark Survival Evolved
3840x2160 Epic Preset (100 % Resolution Scale)
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
15 fps ∼100%
1920x1080 Epic Preset (100 % Resolution Scale)
Razer Blade Pro 2017
GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 7820HK
39.6 fps ∼100%
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 1700
20.3 (min: 18) fps ∼51% -49%

Additionally, the benchmark table reveals that the UHD edition would hardly have benefited from a 120 Hz panel. Over 60 FPS is seldom possible in 4K, even with a GTX 1080. Only light games such as “Rocket League pass the 100 FPS mark at full details.

low med. high ultra4K
The Witcher 3 (2015) 12864.946.7fps
Resident Evil 7 (2017) 18215252fps
For Honor (2017) 16312252.9fps
Ghost Recon Wildlands (2017) 9555.437.1fps
Prey (2017) 13713361.6fps
Rocket League (2017) 230103fps
Dirt 4 (2017) 15591.459fps
Playerunknown's Battlegrounds (PUBG) (2017) 10784.429.9fps
F1 2017 (2017) 14510051fps
Ark Survival Evolved (2017) 59.839.615fps

Emissions

And now we come to the Blade Pro's greatest weakness. The very loud noises that emit from the gaming computer make it a no-go for sensitive users. At 30-33 dB(A) in idle mode, the device is only faintly audible up close (the fans rotate at an unobtrusive speed), and unlike in many other high-end notebooks, the system is not prone to sudden increases in fan speed. But under load, the volume grows to a level that is very bothersome. Yes, the 17-inch laptop's average of 43 dB(A) in 3DMark 06 is not excessively high; but most modern games strain the hardware far more, as we see with the 55 dB(A) of “The Witcher 3”.

sound pressure level idle
sound pressure level idle
sound pressure level load
sound pressure level load
sound pressure level speaker
sound pressure level speaker

Without headphones, the fans become irritating very quickly. The Aorus X7 v7 and HP Omen 17, both of which are equipped with a GTX 1070 and are only marginally slower, remain at a substantially quieter 45-47 dB(A). The Blade Pro's maximum sound pressure level is also quite intense at 58 dB(A). It is not for nothing that the 17-inch laptop is chiefly criticized for its volume in the comment section on amazon.de. The main culprit is not the GPU, but rather the CPU – as we will explain shortly.

Noise Level

Idle
30 / 31 / 33 dB(A)
Load
43 / 58 dB(A)
 
 
 
30 dB
silent
40 dB(A)
audible
50 dB(A)
loud
 
min: dark, med: mid, max: light   Audix TM1, Arta (15 cm distance)   environment noise: 30 dB(A)
Razer Blade Pro 2017
7820HK, GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop)
Aorus X7 v7
7820HK, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
6820HK, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
HP Omen 17-an014ng
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
MSI GS73VR 7RF
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop)
Acer Predator Helios 300
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop)
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
1700, Radeon RX 580 (Laptop)
Noise
-2%
-3%
-3%
7%
3%
-7%
off / environment *
30
30
-0%
31.2
-4%
30
-0%
28.1
6%
31
-3%
31
-3%
Idle Minimum *
30
33
-10%
31.2
-4%
30
-0%
30.8
-3%
31
-3%
32
-7%
Idle Average *
31
36
-16%
32.6
-5%
37
-19%
30.8
1%
32
-3%
38
-23%
Idle Maximum *
33
41
-24%
34.75
-5%
39
-18%
30.9
6%
33
-0%
40
-21%
Load Average *
43
41
5%
47.8
-11%
44
-2%
42.2
2%
44
-2%
42
2%
Witcher 3 ultra *
55
45
18%
47
15%
44.4
19%
46
16%
54
2%
Load Maximum *
58
52
10%
49.7
14%
55
5%
48.6
16%
50
14%
57
2%

* ... smaller is better

Temperature

The Blade Pro's temperatures are by no means perfect either. Unlike other high-end laptops, most of which at least remain under 30 °C (~86 °F) in idle mode, our test device heats up significantly in every circumstance. 2 hours in idle mode led to case temperatures of 32 to 37 °C (~90-99 °F). However, the serious heat comes first under load. A maximum of 53 °C (~127 °F) is actually lower than some competitors, but the Razer device's heat is inconveniently distributed – even the palm rest warms to uncomfortable temperatures of over 40 °C (~104 °F). As a result, prolonged gaming sessions prove to be an unpleasant experience.

stress test
stress test
full load top (Optris PI 640)
full load top (Optris PI 640)
full load bottom (Optris PI 640)
full load bottom (Optris PI 640)

But the components reach the truly critical temperatures. The processor heated to up to 98 °C (~208 °F) in the stress test, even with Turbo Boost inactive. The graphics card, which throttled a little, reached just under 80 °C (~176 °F) after an hour under full load. Overall, many facts lead us to conclude that the cooling system is taxed to its limit. In a computer with the combination of a Core i7-7820HK and a GeForce GTX 1080, the cooling system needs to be more powerful.

Max. Load
 51 °C51 °C53 °C 
 51 °C52 °C47 °C 
 48 °C49 °C45 °C 
Maximum: 53 °C
Average: 49.7 °C
50 °C53 °C48 °C
45 °C47 °C47 °C
45 °C48 °C46 °C
Maximum: 53 °C
Average: 47.7 °C
Power Supply (max.)  61 °C | Room Temperature 20 °C | Voltcraft IR-900
Razer Blade Pro 2017
7820HK, GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop)
Aorus X7 v7
7820HK, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
6820HK, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
HP Omen 17-an014ng
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
MSI GS73VR 7RF
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop)
Acer Predator Helios 300
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop)
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
1700, Radeon RX 580 (Laptop)
Heat
0%
11%
2%
12%
-2%
3%
Maximum Upper Side *
53
51
4%
53.3
-1%
48
9%
50.2
5%
57
-8%
51
4%
Maximum Bottom *
53
64
-21%
50
6%
54
-2%
55.6
-5%
59
-11%
54
-2%
Idle Upper Side *
35
33
6%
30.3
13%
35
-0%
27.8
21%
36
-3%
33
6%
Idle Bottom *
37
33
11%
28
24%
37
-0%
26.8
28%
31
16%
35
5%

* ... smaller is better

Speakers

Razer advertises the Blade Pro as equipped with THX certified video and audio reproduction. However, checking the speakers positioned on the sides of the device reveals that the THX seal only applies to the audio output, i.e. audio plug. At a price this high, many consumers would assume the computer offers better sound quality than this.

As with most laptops, it lacks bass and does not produce a precise and balanced sound. Films, music and games sound too tinny and impure for our taste. We would certainly connect external speakers or a headset. According to our audio analysis, the Blade Pro's toughest competitor, the Aorus X7 v7, offers a more pleasant sound. The pre-installed Dolby Digital Plus Home Theater audio software, which contains various sound profiles and improvements, is unfortunately unable to make a difference here.

dB(A) 0102030405060708090Deep BassMiddle BassHigh BassLower RangeMidsHigher MidsLower HighsMid HighsUpper HighsSuper Highs2038.440.52532323128.431.24033.338.15036.638.4632741.28025.848.910030.451.512524.949.516024.957.820024.963.425024.16831522.271.240019.869.950019.472.163019.177.480018.975.5100018.470.6125018.570160018.474.1200018.472.5250018.771.6315019.170.7400019.166.1500019.458.7630019.554.9800019.755.31000020.3591250020.948.11600020.750.9SPL31.583.1N1.656.2median 19.5Razer Blade Pro 2017median 68Delta1.97.639.337.933.73229.22928.82826.426.627.931.526.842.625.754.924.654.223.850.123.657.522.759.322.162.721.266.920.866.819.7661966.618.571.817.974.217.773.417.770.217.771.217.670.317.562.517.564.217.466.417.461.417.55417.557.617.354.530.481.51.450.8median 17.9Aorus X7 v7median 64.22.55.5hearing rangehide median Pink Noise
Razer Blade Pro 2017 audio analysis

(+) | speakers can play relatively loud (83 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(±) | reduced bass - on average 8.8% lower than median
(±) | linearity of bass is average (9% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(+) | balanced mids - only 4.7% away from median
(+) | mids are linear (5.7% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(±) | reduced highs - on average 7.5% lower than median
(+) | highs are linear (6.4% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(±) | linearity of overall sound is average (16.2% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 40% of all tested devices in this class were better, 6% similar, 54% worse
» The best had a delta of 6%, average was 18%, worst was 37%
Compared to all devices tested
» 22% of all tested devices were better, 5% similar, 73% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

Aorus X7 v7 audio analysis

(+) | speakers can play relatively loud (82 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(±) | reduced bass - on average 7.8% lower than median
(±) | linearity of bass is average (10.7% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(±) | higher mids - on average 5.2% higher than median
(+) | mids are linear (4.6% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(+) | balanced highs - only 4.3% away from median
(±) | linearity of highs is average (8% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(+) | overall sound is linear (12.7% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 18% of all tested devices in this class were better, 6% similar, 76% worse
» The best had a delta of 6%, average was 18%, worst was 37%
Compared to all devices tested
» 9% of all tested devices were better, 3% similar, 89% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

Frequency diagram in comparison (checkboxes above selectable/deselectable!)

Energy Management

Because the Blade Pro lacks graphics switching, even in idle mode, it uses a considerable amount of energy. Gaming notebooks that support Nvidia's Optimus technology easily beat our test device's 31-44 watts here. The Medion Erazer X7849, for example, consumes only 14-24 watts. In 3D mode, the numbers fall along the same lines as the Aorus X7 v7. The Aorus uses 107-259 watts, while the Razer device consumes a nearly identical 107-258 watts.

Power Consumption
Off / Standbydarklight 0.8 / 1.3 Watt
Idledarkmidlight 31 / 36 / 44 Watt
Load midlight 107 / 258 Watt
 color bar
Key: min: dark, med: mid, max: light        Metrahit Energy
Razer Blade Pro 2017
7820HK, GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop)
Aorus X7 v7
7820HK, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
6820HK, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
HP Omen 17-an014ng
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop)
MSI GS73VR 7RF
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop)
Acer Predator Helios 300
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop)
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
1700, Radeon RX 580 (Laptop)
Power Consumption
7%
33%
22%
38%
50%
-17%
Idle Minimum *
31
27
13%
14
55%
22
29%
14.2
54%
7
77%
43
-39%
Idle Average *
36
33
8%
20
44%
28
22%
23.5
35%
13
64%
50
-39%
Idle Maximum *
44
40
9%
23.8
46%
35
20%
23.8
46%
20
55%
57
-30%
Load Average *
107
107
-0%
103
4%
93
13%
90.9
15%
81
24%
125
-17%
Load Maximum *
258
259
-0%
212
18%
208
19%
171.6
33%
162
37%
240
7%
Witcher 3 ultra *
212
190
10%
157
26%
116
45%
127
40%
180
15%

* ... smaller is better

Battery Life

Razer's choice to go without Optimus reduces the battery life more than anything. Although the Blade Pro is equipped with a 99 Wh battery (the largest of any competitor), its results in our tests are only convincing to a limited extent. Some of the competition cuts out even earlier, but 3:17 hours surfing the internet over WLAN and 3:24 hours of HD video playback are still no reason to rejoice. Gamers who travel often would be better served with a different device. Laptops with graphics switching usually achieve better results. Theoretically, the Blade Pro would be an excellent choice for gaming on the go, given that its performance in battery mode "only" sinks by a margin of around 30% (tested with “The Witcher 3”). Other gaming laptops experience over 50% drops in frame rates.

Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
4h 13min
NBC WiFi Websurfing Battery Test 1.3
3h 17min
Big Buck Bunny H.264 1080p
3h 24min
Load (maximum brightness)
1h 21min
Razer Blade Pro 2017
7820HK, GeForce GTX 1080 (Laptop), 99 Wh
Aorus X7 v7
7820HK, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 94 Wh
Medion Erazer X7849 MD 60292
6820HK, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 60 Wh
HP Omen 17-an014ng
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1070 (Laptop), 86 Wh
MSI GS73VR 7RF
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 65 Wh
Acer Predator Helios 300
7700HQ, GeForce GTX 1060 (Laptop), 48 Wh
Asus GL702ZC-GC104T
1700, Radeon RX 580 (Laptop), 76 Wh
Battery Runtime
-10%
-40%
26%
-10%
47%
-51%
Reader / Idle
253
221
-13%
163
-36%
349
38%
301
19%
611
142%
103
-59%
H.264
204
165
-19%
255
25%
281
38%
88
-57%
WiFi v1.3
197
180
-9%
91
-54%
267
36%
163
-17%
279
42%
90
-54%
Load
81
81
0%
57
-30%
84
4%
55
-32%
54
-33%
53
-35%

Pros

+ mechanical keyboard with RGB backlighting
+ optional CPU overclocking
+ clean manufacturing
+ very good color space coverage
+ powerful hardware
+ large touchpad
+ slim build
+ attractive design
+ thin power supply
+ Thunderbolt 3
+ classy case
+ 32 GB RAM
+ PCIe SSDs
+ G-Sync

Cons

- irregular lighting along lower rim of display
- parts of palm rest heat to uncomfortable temperatures
- GTX 1080 weaker than in other laptops
- Razer Synapse makes registration compulsory
- very loud in 3D mode
- reflective display surface
- laptop could be lighter
- somewhat meager battery life
- RAM on-board
- paltry reaction times
- mediocre sound
- extremely expensive

Verdict

Razer Blade Pro 2017, test device courtesy of Razer Germany.
Razer Blade Pro 2017, test device courtesy of Razer Germany.

If we set aside the emissions, speakers and battery life for just a moment, the Razer Blade Pro is a very well-designed high-end notebook. With its slim build, high-quality materials and classy design, it should catch the fancy of gamers who value quality, refinement and a reasonable degree of transportability. When you add the RGB backlit mechanical keyboard, this 17-inch laptop is one of the highest quality devices we have ever held in our hands.

Thanks to the 32 GB of DDR4 RAM, the SSD RAID, and the GeForce GTX 1080, it certainly is not lacking in performance power – though we do feel compelled to criticize Razer for the soldered RAM. The display in the UHD edition we tested is not beyond reproach either. On the one hand, the IGZO panel scores points for its extensive color space coverage, low black value and strong contrast. On the other, its low brightness and reflective surface are quite irritating – not to mention the massive problems our test model had with lighting inconsistencies.

There is also plenty of room for improvement when it comes to the sound of the integrated speakers, as well as the laptop's energy consumption rates (which negatively impact its battery life). But the Blade Pro loses the most points for its high temperatures and loud noise levels. Ultimately, games can only truly be enjoyed with headphones over the ears. It appears the cooling system is only fit to serve a GeForce GTX 1070 or GTX 1080 Max-Q. Given all these deficiencies on top of its luxury price, the 4K version will be hard-pressed to successfully compete with the rest of the (mostly fatter) laptops on the 17-inch market.

Razer Blade Pro 2017 - 09/27/2017 v6
Florian Glaser

Chassis
92 / 98 → 94%
Keyboard
87%
Pointing Device
81%
Connectivity
64 / 81 → 79%
Weight
53 / 66 → 76%
Battery
70%
Display
80%
Games Performance
97%
Application Performance
95%
Temperature
67 / 95 → 71%
Noise
63 / 90 → 70%
Audio
70%
Average
77%
84%
Gaming - Weighted Average

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Razer Blade Pro 2017 (i7-7820HK, GTX 1080, 4K) Laptop Review
Florian Glaser, 2017-09-30 (Update: 2017-10-19)