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Rumor | The PlayStation 5's GPU could be clocked at a whopping 2 GHz and feature 40 CUs, console rumored to have a February 2020 unveiling

The Sony PlayStation 5 is expected to have some serious horsepower. (Source: T3)
The Sony PlayStation 5 is expected to have some serious horsepower. (Source: T3)
Latest PlayStation 5 news is that the console's GPU could have a 2 GHz clock speed and feature 40 CUs. This puts the GPU almost on par with the NVIDIA RTX 2080 in terms of raw performance. Also, Sony is reportedly preparing for a PlayStation Meeting 2020 in which details about the PlayStation 5 would be revealed along with a few game demos.

Clock speeds of the purported PS5's GPU were leaked earlier this week. The GPU, codenamed Oberon, was revealed to be running at a staggering 2 GHz and could feature up to 40 CUs. RedGamingTech says that famed leakster Komachi (who leaked Oberon clocks) privately told him, "BC1 is 40 CU, BC2 is 18 CU, and Oberon Native is unknown. Perhaps, BC means Back Compatible."

What this means is that the PS5's GPU could feature 40 CUs. The native configuration is not yet known and it is possible that the 40 CU count belongs to a dev kit (retail units usually have lower specs). For perspective, the PlayStation 4 Pro had 36 CUs while the base model had 18 CUs. 

If the above information is indeed true, we could be looking at performance on par with an NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 (stock). The 40 CU RDNA part could yield a theoretical performance of 9.2 TFLOPs, which is very close to the RTX 2080's 10.07 TFLOP mark. On Polaris-based architectures, this would be equivalent to 14 TFLOPs, which is about 2.3x the power of the Xbox One X. 

PlayStation 5 could be revealed early next year

In another news, we hear that the upcoming Sony PlayStation 5 console could be revealed as early as February 12, 2020, according to a leaked internal memo posted by user 'D.Final' on the NeoGAF forums. According to the source, Sony will be hosting a PlayStation Meeting 2020 event on the said date and is currently preparing for the same. Big ticket publishers such as Activision, Square Enix, Ubisoft, EA, etc. are expected to grace the event.

The memo seems to indicate that Sony will reveal details about the PlayStation 5 and possibly demo first-party games such as Last of Us Part 2 and Ghost of Tsushima. These demos are expected to show off the power of the PlayStation 5's hardware. The note is also suggestive of developments being made to PlayStation VR 2 (PSVR 2) for a launch sometime before fiscal year 2021. 

While there's a very good possibility that Sony would follow a similar launch pattern as it did with the PlayStation 4 in 2013, the above information comes from an anonymous source so the usual cautionary disclaimers apply.

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PS5 Oberon clocks. (Source: @Komachi_Ensaka on Twitter)
PS5 Oberon clocks. (Source: @Komachi_Ensaka on Twitter)
Sony PlayStation 5 could be unveiled at the PlayStation Meeting 2020 in February - 1. (Source: User D.Final on NeoGAF Forums)
Sony PlayStation 5 could be unveiled at the PlayStation Meeting 2020 in February - 1. (Source: User D.Final on NeoGAF Forums)
Sony PlayStation 5 could be unveiled at the PlayStation Meeting 2020 in February - contd. (Source: User D.Final on NeoGAF Forums)
Sony PlayStation 5 could be unveiled at the PlayStation Meeting 2020 in February - contd. (Source: User D.Final on NeoGAF Forums)
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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 08 > The PlayStation 5's GPU could be clocked at a whopping 2 GHz and feature 40 CUs, console rumored to have a February 2020 unveiling
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2019-08-18 (Update: 2019-08-18)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam - News Editor
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.