Notebookcheck

HP Envy x360 15t-w200 Convertible Review

Jack of all trades… The latest Envy x360 15-inch convertible is strikingly similar to the previous ones. And as before, it’s here to convince us that it can do it all: be a laptop, be a tablet, play some games, do some work, all for an affordable price… but is it really the ideal choice for these tasks?

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Between the high-end (and often highly acclaimed) HP Spectre notebooks and the low-end Pavilion line rests the HP Envy series. Arguably a bit of a misnomer, this line of machines is rarely responsible for trendsetting or boundary-pushing, but nevertheless it is appealing enough to the average consumer with the average budget.

The notebook we’re evaluating today, the HP Envy x360 15t-w200, falls squarely into that category, seeking mid-range success and nothing more. This is in spite of its capable Intel Core i7-7500U and NVIDIA GeForce 930MX switchable graphics, and alongside its comfortable (at first glance) 15.6-inch 1080p touchscreen. Accompanying these specifications are a much less impressive 1 TB 5400 RPM mechanical hard drive, a relatively ordinary case design, and the questionable prospect of convertible tablet functionality (in light of its large size and somewhat prohibitive weight). The Envy x360 wants to do it all on a limited budget.

At a street price of under $700, can the Envy x360 appeal to the budget-conscious, average consumer who’s still seeking a compelling package?

HP Envy x360 15t-w200 (Envy x360 Series)
Graphics adapter
NVIDIA GeForce 930MX - 2048 MB, Core: 952 - 1020 MHz, Memory: 900 MHz, 21.20.16.4471, yes, Intel HD Graphics 620
Memory
8192 MB 
, PC3-12800
Display
15.6 inch 16:9, 1920 x 1080 pixel 141 PPI, yes, BOE0679 , IPS, glossy: yes
Mainboard
Intel Sunrise Point-LP
Storage
WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1, 1000 GB 
, 5400 rpm
Connections
1 USB 2.0, 2 USB 3.0 / 3.1 Gen1, 1 HDMI, 1 Kensington Lock, Audio Connections: 3.5 mm combo, Card Reader: SD, Sensors: Accelerometer, gyrometer
Networking
Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller (10/100/1000MBit), Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7265 (a/b/g/h/n/ac), Bluetooth 4.1
Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 24 x 383 x 252 ( = 0.94 x 15.08 x 9.92 in)
Battery
48 Wh, 4212 mAh Lithium-Ion
Operating System
Microsoft Windows 10 Home 64 Bit
Camera
Webcam: 720p HD
Primary Camera: 1 MPix
Additional features
Speakers: 2.0, bottom-mounted, Keyboard: Chiclet, Keyboard Light: yes, 12 Months Warranty
Weight
2.292 kg ( = 80.85 oz / 5.05 pounds), Power Supply: 334 g ( = 11.78 oz / 0.74 pounds)

 

Case

Seams are visible in the plastic perimeter
Seams are visible in the plastic perimeter

Like many machines in its segment, the Envy x360 is constructed primarily out of plastic but features metal accents in areas which matter most—the display lid and top cover, specifically, which are both lined with a sheet of brushed aluminum. Although the aluminum is thin and lacks the luxurious feel of, say, an Apple MacBook or Dell XPS 13, it does provide some rigidity to these regions. There is consequently very little flex present on the base unit, and the display lid—while not exactly sturdy and lined with a silver plastic perimeter—resists torsion moderately well. Aesthetically, the aluminum is also pleasing to the eye, and it resists fingerprints and oils better than many alternatives.

The machine carries a look which is neither cheap nor expensive. Seams in plastic are visible and gaps are not perfectly even in all areas (see our photos for examples). Still, from a distance, it's attractive enough.

The 360-degree hinges support the screen well, but they allow too much bounce than is ideal for comfortable touchscreen operation; taps on the screen inevitably produce vibration which lasts a few seconds each, and coupled with the glossy finish and poor screen brightness (more on this in a bit), it’s an unfortunate experience. The notebook also cannot be opened with one hand; doing so will lift the base unit off the surface.

We must once again admit our puzzlement at the endurance of the 15.6-inch convertible notebook trend; not only is it impractical due to the sheer size of the machine, but the weight (2.3 kg) is nothing convenient to hold in tablet form. Its only plausible uses are on a counter or table for quick reference at a distance or on a couch or bed streaming video in lieu of a nearby television. Nevertheless, it’s been years now since we first saw this design, and the same limitations still apply.

Describe the case: size, weight. compare to others

Connectivity

Port selection and placement has not changed since our review of the HP Envy 15-w000ng x360 over a year ago. For more information about them, please see our previous review.

SD Card Reader

SDCardreader Transfer Speed
average JPG Copy Test (av. of 3 runs)
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
 
79 MB/s ∼100% +17%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
 
74.2 MB/s ∼94% +10%
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
 
67.37 MB/s ∼85%
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
 
21 MB/s ∼27% -69%
maximum AS SSD Seq Read Test (1GB)
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
 
89.97 MB/s ∼100%
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
 
85.6 MB/s ∼95% -5%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
 
85.11 MB/s ∼95% -5%
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
 
26.5 MB/s ∼29% -71%

Communication

The Intel WLAN adapter
The Intel WLAN adapter

The Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7265 managed solid network connectivity during our testing period and has long been a popular choice amongst OEMs. This adapter includes Bluetooth 4.1 connectivity as well. A Realtek Gigabit Ethernet port is also included thanks to the sufficiently-sized case of the 15t.

Networking
iperf3 Client (receive) TCP 1 m 4M x10
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7265
642 MBit/s ∼100%
iperf3 Client (transmit) TCP 1 m 4M x10
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7265
544 MBit/s ∼100%

Accessories and Warranty

The Envy x360 15t includes an average-sized 65 W AC adapter. The warranty is 1 year, depot, with 90-day phone support.

Maintenance

In another knock against practicality, the Envy x360 possesses a terribly inconvenient maintenance design which involves significant disassembly just to reach the most basic components. The first step is to carefully remove eight covers from the bottom of the machine, including all four rubber feet. Next, twelve screws are removed, after which the unit is flipped back over. Then, a plastic scribe must be used to carefully pry the entire aluminum top cover out of its bordering plastic surround, disengaging numerous clips along the way and taking great care not to damage any perimeter ports in the process.

Three separate ZIF connectors must be carefully disconnected during this step before the cover can be placed aside. Finally, the user can now access most replaceable parts, including the battery, the storage drive, the WLAN adapter, and the system fan. It is worth noting that in order for RAM replacements and upgrades to take place, the entire system board must be removed. The keyboard, meanwhile, cannot be replaced; the entire top cover is one single, monolithic piece, with the keyboard riveted using plastic rivets to the underside.

Careful with the ZIF connectors while diassembling.
Careful with the ZIF connectors while diassembling.
The keyboard is monolithically riveted to the top cover.
The keyboard is monolithically riveted to the top cover.

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Input Devices

Keyboard

The keyboard on the 15t-w200 is more comfortable than what we recall from previous iterations. Although the key travel is still relatively short, the feedback is crisper and as such adjustment to typing on it is more rapid than it is with some other Ultrabook keyboards. The keys also lack the clattery sensation that many budget models exude, instead managing a more tightly-constructed sensation. It’s still merely an above-average keyboard and nowhere near the quality of a ThinkPad or Latitude, but it fits the target market just fine. Also included are a keyboard backlight and—thanks to the oversized form factor—a numeric keypad to the right.

Touchpad

The Synaptics touchpad, meanwhile, though large and spacious, is constructed of plastic (not glass, like that of many high-end models) and features a perceptible delay between movement and pointer response. The integrated buttons are also nothing special, rendering drag-and-drop operations sometimes infuriating, as integrated buttons tend to do. Overall, it’s not a bad touchpad, but it’s nothing remarkable and absolutely will beget the acquisition of a wireless mouse to offset its inadequacies.

Touchscreen

Fortunately, the x360 also features a touchscreen for easy navigation, though as previously mentioned, the bouncy hinges do it no favors in either laptop or stand form. The screen itself (lined with a sheet of protective plastic, not Gorilla Glass or similar) responds to touch perfectly however.

Display

Subpixel layout
Subpixel layout

While the Envy x360 15t’s display has improved over that of the Envy 15-w000ng we reviewed last September, it’s still disappointing. The 15t-w200 features a 15.6-inch 1920x1080 IPS display panel, which factors out to a PPI of 141 (acceptable for most uses). The panel adopts a high-gloss, edge-to-edge finish which is highly reflective. Subjectively, the picture appears rather drab and washed-out, with whites appearing greyish and colors lacking any sort of saturated pop.

201.1
cd/m²
192.5
cd/m²
193.1
cd/m²
190.6
cd/m²
204.9
cd/m²
181.2
cd/m²
180.6
cd/m²
199.6
cd/m²
167.9
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
X-Rite i1Pro Basic 2
Maximum: 204.9 cd/m² Average: 190.2 cd/m² Minimum: 15 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 82 %
Center on Battery: 204.9 cd/m²
Contrast: 1009:1 (Black: 0.203 cd/m²)
ΔE Color 4.7 | 0.8-29.43 Ø6.3
ΔE Greyscale 3.86 | 0.64-98 Ø6.6
64% sRGB (Argyll) 41% AdobeRGB 1998 (Argyll)
Gamma: 2.36
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
BOE0679 , IPS, 15.6, 1920x1080
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
Chi Mey CHMN15D3, IPS, 15.6, 1920x1080
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
AU Optronics B156HW01 V0, IPS, 15.6, 1920x1080
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
BOE HF NV156FHM-N42, IPS, 15.6, 1920x1080
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
IPS, 15.6, 3840x2160
Response Times
23%
25%
8%
22%
Response Time Grey 50% / Grey 80% *
56 (22.8, 33.2)
30.8 (12.8, 18)
45%
42 (19, 23)
25%
43.2 (19.6, 23.6)
23%
32.8 (14.8, 18)
41%
Response Time Black / White *
28.8 (6, 22.8)
22 (11.2, 10.8)
24%
22 (6, 16)
24%
30.8 (17.6, 13.2)
-7%
28 (4.8, 23.2)
3%
PWM Frequency
201.6
200 (90)
-1%
Screen
6%
1%
5%
3%
Brightness middle
204.9
225
10%
266
30%
254
24%
298
45%
Brightness
190
210
11%
249
31%
230
21%
295
55%
Brightness Distribution
82
85
4%
85
4%
86
5%
88
7%
Black Level *
0.203
0.22
-8%
0.26
-28%
0.26
-28%
0.57
-181%
Contrast
1009
1023
1%
1023
1%
977
-3%
523
-48%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 *
4.7
4.13
12%
4.98
-6%
4.23
10%
4.43
6%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 max. *
9.03
9.36
-4%
11.82
-31%
9.5
-5%
6.62
27%
Greyscale DeltaE2000 *
3.86
2.53
34%
2.68
31%
2.87
26%
2.45
37%
Gamma
2.36 102%
2.6 92%
2.27 106%
2.35 102%
2.45 98%
CCT
6834 95%
6360 102%
6583 99%
5965 109%
6326 103%
Color Space (Percent of AdobeRGB 1998)
41
39.8
-3%
36
-12%
40.35
-2%
57.2
40%
Color Space (Percent of sRGB)
64
62.5
-2%
57
-11%
63.48
-1%
87.8
37%
Total Average (Program / Settings)
15% / 9%
13% / 5%
7% / 5%
13% / 6%

* ... smaller is better

Measurements explain just why this is the case. With an average brightness of just 190.2 cd/m², the x360 15t appears dim in any but the tamest of environments. A brightness distribution of 82% is only average, with one quadrant (lower-right) as low as 168 cd/m². At least the black value of 0.203 cd/m² can provide a much-improved contrast ratio of 1009:1—a mollification to some degree, at least, on paper.

Our measurements also revealed just 64% coverage of the sRGB color space, and 41% of the AdobeRGB 1998 spectrum. Some competitors manage even less, but when combined with the insufficient brightness of the display panel, this only exacerbates the dull overall appearance.

vs. sRGB
vs. sRGB
vs. HP Spectre x360 15
vs. HP Spectre x360 15
vs. Dell Inspiron 5568
vs. Dell Inspiron 5568
vs. Lenovo Yoga 510
vs. Lenovo Yoga 510

CalMAN, at least, shows no offensive transgressions in the realm of color accuracy; with DeltaE values of under 4.7 and 3.86 in ColorChecker and Greyscale, respectively, the Envy is only slightly outpaced by its rivals here. Total Gamma (2.36) and the CCT Average (6834) are also both quite close to ideal.

Color analysis (pre-calibration)
Color analysis (pre-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (pre-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (pre-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (pre-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (pre-calibration)
Color analysis (post-calibration)
Color analysis (post-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (post-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (post-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (post-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (post-calibration)

Display Response Times

Display response times show how fast the screen is able to change from one color to the next. Slow response times can lead to afterimages and can cause moving objects to appear blurry (ghosting). Gamers of fast-paced 3D titles should pay special attention to fast response times.
       Response Time Black to White
28.8 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 6 ms rise
↘ 22.8 ms fall
The screen shows relatively slow response rates in our tests and may be too slow for gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.8 (minimum) to 240 (maximum) ms. » 65 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is worse than the average of all tested devices (26.1 ms).
       Response Time 50% Grey to 80% Grey
56 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 22.8 ms rise
↘ 33.2 ms fall
The screen shows slow response rates in our tests and will be unsatisfactory for gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.9 (minimum) to 636 (maximum) ms. » 91 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is worse than the average of all tested devices (41.7 ms).

Screen Flickering / PWM (Pulse-Width Modulation)

To dim the screen, some notebooks will simply cycle the backlight on and off in rapid succession - a method called Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) . This cycling frequency should ideally be undetectable to the human eye. If said frequency is too low, users with sensitive eyes may experience strain or headaches or even notice the flickering altogether.
Screen flickering / PWM detected 201.6 Hz

The display backlight flickers at 201.6 Hz (Likely utilizing PWM) .

The frequency of 201.6 Hz is relatively low, so sensitive users will likely notice flickering and experience eyestrain at the stated brightness setting and below.

In comparison: 54 % of all tested devices do not use PWM to dim the display. If PWM was detected, an average of 10402 (minimum: 43 - maximum: 588200) Hz was measured.

Outdoors, the x360 is hardly usable thanks to the high-gloss screen finish and poor panel brightness. What fractional usefulness it actually possesses is limited to a very small range of shaded areas, and even then, the screen must be carefully adjusted to minimize the intrusion of obstructive reflections. Viewing angles aren't bad, but are surprisingly subpar in spite of the IPS panel; this seems mostly a factor of the plastic surface covering the touchscreen.

In the sun
In the sun
In the shade
In the shade
Viewing angles
Viewing angles

Performance

The x360 15t-w200 can be configured with a variety of processors ranging from AMD A12 APUs all the way up to Intel Core i7 Kaby Lake (7th generation) CPUs. Our review unit came outfitted with the latter—specifically, an Intel Core i7-7500U, which is a dual-core CPU featuring a base clock rate of 2.7 GHz and Turbo clock rates ranging up to 3.5 GHz (single- and dual-core Turbo Boost). This is coupled with a frugal TDP of just 15 W, making it ideal for mid-sized Ultrabooks and convertibles such as the Envy x360.

Our review unit also included a switchable graphics combo of Intel Graphics 620 and NVIDIA GeForce 930MX. 8 GB of single-channel DDR3 memory were installed in our unit, which (to reiterate what we said earlier in the maintenance section) cannot be easily upgraded—so choose wisely upon purchasing.

LatencyMon reported no problems with streaming real-time audio and video. However, do not expect full graphical performance while running unplugged; when we attempted to invoke the 930MX on battery power, the 3DMark 06 score we received of 896 was over 90% below that of the score we received while plugged in (11671).

CPU-Z CPU
CPU-Z CPU
CPU-Z Caches
CPU-Z Caches
CPU-Z Mainboard
CPU-Z Mainboard
CPU-Z Memory
CPU-Z Memory
CPU-Z RAM SPD
CPU-Z RAM SPD
GPU-Z
GPU-Z
Octane v2
Octane v2
ComputeMark
ComputeMark

Processor

One area in which the i7-equipped x360 needs not feel ashamed is that of CPU performance. With Cinebench R15 single and multi 64-bit scores of 146 and 349, respectively, as well as all other scores across the board topping the charts in comparison to our field of competitors, the 15t-w200 can easily handle demanding processing loads.

Cinebench R11.5
Cinebench R11.5
Cinebench R15
Cinebench R15
Cinebench R11.5
CPU Single 64Bit
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
Intel Core i7-7500U
1.66 Points ∼71%
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
Intel Core i5-6200U
1.37 Points ∼59% -17%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Intel Core i5-6200U
1.34 Points ∼57% -19%
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
Intel Core i5-6200U
1.28 Points ∼55% -23%
CPU Multi 64Bit
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
Intel Core i7-7500U
3.9 Points ∼16%
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
Intel Core i5-6200U
3.42 Points ∼14% -12%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Intel Core i5-6200U
3.23 Points ∼14% -17%
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
Intel Core i5-6200U
3.16 Points ∼13% -19%
Cinebench R15
CPU Single 64Bit
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
Intel Core i7-7500U
146 Points ∼71%
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
Intel Core i7-6500U
128 Points ∼62% -12%
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
Intel Core i5-6200U
123 Points ∼60% -16%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Intel Core i5-6200U
114 Points ∼55% -22%
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
Intel Core i5-6200U
113 Points ∼55% -23%
CPU Multi 64Bit
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
Intel Core i7-7500U
349 Points ∼12%
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
Intel Core i5-6200U
310 Points ∼11% -11%
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
Intel Core i7-6500U
308 Points ∼10% -12%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Intel Core i5-6200U
289 Points ∼10% -17%
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
Intel Core i5-6200U
284 Points ∼10% -19%
wPrime 2.0x - 1024m
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
Intel Core i5-6200U
497.941 s * ∼6% -5%
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
Intel Core i7-7500U
476 s * ∼6%
Super Pi Mod 1.5 XS 32M - ---
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
Intel Core i5-6200U
655.981 Seconds * ∼3% -10%
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
Intel Core i7-7500U
599 Seconds * ∼3%

* ... smaller is better

Cinebench R11.5 CPU Single 64Bit
1.66 Points
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Multi 64Bit
3.9 Points
Cinebench R11.5 OpenGL 64Bit
40.38 fps
Cinebench R15 CPU Single 64Bit
146 Points
Cinebench R15 CPU Multi 64Bit
349 Points
Cinebench R15 OpenGL 64Bit
46.38 fps
Cinebench R15 Ref. Match 64Bit
99.6 %
Help

System Performance

System performance, meanwhile, is perceptibly hampered by the 5400 RPM mechanical hard drive. Coming off an SSD-equipped system, the 15t-w200 felt like something from years ago, chugging through the Windows startup process rather loudly and taking a moment longer than we’re used to when installing and launching programs.

We had trouble running PCMark 8 on the system for unexplained reasons, but we were able to acquire a PCMark 8 Home Score Accelerated result of 3236—which actually isn’t bad.

PCMark 8 - Home Score Accelerated v2
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Radeon R7 M460, 6200U, Liteonit CV3-DE256
3651 Points ∼60% +13%
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
HD Graphics 520, 6500U, Toshiba THNSNK256GCS8
3607 Points ∼59% +11%
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
GeForce 930MX, 7500U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1
3236 Points ∼53%
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
HD Graphics 520, 6200U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-21KHST0
3026 Points ∼50% -6%
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
HD Graphics 520, 6200U, Sandisk X300 SD7SN6S-256G-1006
2847 Points ∼47% -12%
PCMark 8 Home Score Accelerated v2
3236 points
Help

Storage Devices

Although it’s quick for a 5400 RPM drive, the internal WDC Slim (model WD10SPCX) drive in the Envy x360 15t-w200 is quite obviously a huge step down from the solid-state drives powering many competing machines. While it manages over 100 MB/s read/write in sequential tests, its 4K performance—what the user really notices in day-to-day usage—is abysmal in comparison. This is a fact of all mechanical drives, however. Just be advised that, per our evaluation earlier of the maintenance procedures involved in replacing parts in the 15t-w200, aftermarket replacement is not as simple a proposition as it is with most other machines.

The internal WD Slim HDD
The internal WD Slim HDD
HD Tune results
HD Tune results
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
WDC Slim WD10SPCX-21KHST0
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
Toshiba THNSNK256GCS8
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Liteonit CV3-DE256
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
Sandisk X300 SD7SN6S-256G-1006
CrystalDiskMark 3.0
7%
8595%
9131%
8601%
Write 4k QD32
1.05
1.055
0%
197.6
18719%
232
21995%
138.7
13110%
Read 4k QD32
0.801
1.029
28%
275.3
34270%
281.5
35044%
281.2
35006%
Write 4k
1.048
1.097
5%
86.67
8170%
63.65
5973%
93
8774%
Read 4k
0.352
0.373
6%
19.88
5548%
27.05
7585%
35.48
9980%
Write 512
48.09
51.21
6%
242
403%
356.3
641%
318.9
563%
Read 512
31.86
33.01
4%
397.4
1147%
384.5
1107%
258.4
711%
Write Seq
104.2
106
2%
270
159%
450.7
333%
425
308%
Read Seq
104.3
106.9
2%
458.6
340%
487
367%
475.6
356%
WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1
Transfer Rate Minimum: 44.3 MB/s
Transfer Rate Maximum: 101.9 MB/s
Transfer Rate Average: 78.6 MB/s
Access Time: 20.1 ms
Burst Rate: 49.5 MB/s
CPU Usage: 9.4 %

GPU Performance

Thanks to its switchable graphics configuration, our 15t-w200 review unit handled graphical challenges far better than the field of competitors. The GeForce 930MX is the newer version of the 930M, and its 2 GB of GDDR5 VRAM pay off in the form of scores which are well above that of the competition equipped with integrated GPUs. In 3DMark Fire Strike, the score of 1502 we received is 22% above the next competitor (the Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK), and 41% above the HP Spectre x360 15 (which features integrated graphics alone).

This is one area in which the Envy x360 absolutely has an advantage over its brethren. However, it's important to keep that achievement in perspective, as the x360 nonetheless is not prepared to handle anything more than basic gaming demands (as our tests below show). Still, older and less demanding games are playable to some extent, as performance should slightly exceed that of the previously-tested x360.

3DMark
3DMark
3DMark 11
3DMark 11
3DMark 06
3DMark 06
3DMark 11
1280x720 Performance Combined
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
NVIDIA GeForce 930MX, 7500U
1750 Points ∼10%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
AMD Radeon R7 M460, 6200U
1748 Points ∼10% 0%
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
Intel HD Graphics 520, 6500U
1549 Points ∼9% -11%
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
Intel HD Graphics 520, 6200U
1447 Points ∼8% -17%
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
Intel HD Graphics 520, 6200U
957 Points ∼5% -45%
1280x720 Performance GPU
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
NVIDIA GeForce 930MX, 7500U
2160 Points ∼4%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
AMD Radeon R7 M460, 6200U
2137 Points ∼4% -1%
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
Intel HD Graphics 520, 6500U
1506 Points ∼3% -30%
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
Intel HD Graphics 520, 6200U
1404 Points ∼3% -35%
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
Intel HD Graphics 520, 6200U
1280 Points ∼3% -41%
3DMark
1920x1080 Fire Strike Graphics
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
NVIDIA GeForce 930MX, 7500U
1502 Points ∼4%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
AMD Radeon R7 M460, 6200U
1177 Points ∼3% -22%
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
Intel HD Graphics 520, 6200U
883 Points ∼2% -41%
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
Intel HD Graphics 520, 6200U
618 Points ∼2% -59%
1280x720 Cloud Gate Standard Graphics
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
Intel HD Graphics 520, 6500U
8388 Points ∼5% +2%
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
NVIDIA GeForce 930MX, 7500U
8187 Points ∼4%
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
Intel HD Graphics 520, 6200U
6217 Points ∼3% -24%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
AMD Radeon R7 M460, 6200U
6081 Points ∼3% -26%
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
Intel HD Graphics 520, 6200U
5440 Points ∼3% -34%
3DMark 06 Standard
11671 points
3DMark 11 Performance
2286 points
3DMark Ice Storm Standard Score
42360 points
3DMark Cloud Gate Standard Score
6639 points
3DMark Fire Strike Score
1340 points
Help
Batman: Arkham Knight
1920x1080 High / On (Interactive Smoke & Paper Debris Off) AA:SM AF:8x (sort by value)
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
GeForce 930MX, 7500U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1
11 fps ∼7%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Radeon R7 M460, 6200U, Liteonit CV3-DE256
9 fps ∼6% -18%
HP Envy 15-w103ng x360
GeForce 930M, 6200U, Samsung SSD PM851 256 GB MZNTE256HMHP
10 fps ∼7% -9%
1366x768 Normal / Off AF:4x (sort by value)
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
GeForce 930MX, 7500U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1
23 fps ∼12%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Radeon R7 M460, 6200U, Liteonit CV3-DE256
17 fps ∼9% -26%
HP Envy 15-w103ng x360
GeForce 930M, 6200U, Samsung SSD PM851 256 GB MZNTE256HMHP
21 fps ∼11% -9%
1280x720 Low / Off AF:Trilinear (sort by value)
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
GeForce 930MX, 7500U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1
27 fps ∼13%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Radeon R7 M460, 6200U, Liteonit CV3-DE256
20 fps ∼10% -26%
HP Envy 15-w103ng x360
GeForce 930M, 6200U, Samsung SSD PM851 256 GB MZNTE256HMHP
26 fps ∼13% -4%
Metro: Last Light
1366x768 High (DX11) AF:16x (sort by value)
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
GeForce 930MX, 7500U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1
21 fps ∼11%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Radeon R7 M460, 6200U, Liteonit CV3-DE256
16 fps ∼8% -24%
1366x768 Medium (DX10) AF:4x (sort by value)
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
GeForce 930MX, 7500U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1
34 fps ∼17%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Radeon R7 M460, 6200U, Liteonit CV3-DE256
26.2 fps ∼13% -23%
1024x768 Low (DX10) AF:4x (sort by value)
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
GeForce 930MX, 7500U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1
43 fps ∼22%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Radeon R7 M460, 6200U, Liteonit CV3-DE256
35.4 fps ∼18% -18%
BioShock Infinite
1920x1080 Ultra Preset, DX11 (DDOF) (sort by value)
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
GeForce 930MX, 7500U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1
13 fps ∼5%
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
HD Graphics 520, 6200U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-21KHST0
4.84 (min: 2.56, max: 31.19) fps ∼2% -63%
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
HD Graphics 520, 6500U, Toshiba THNSNK256GCS8
8.2 fps ∼3% -37%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Radeon R7 M460, 6200U, Liteonit CV3-DE256
11 fps ∼4% -15%
1366x768 High Preset (sort by value)
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
GeForce 930MX, 7500U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1
46 fps ∼15%
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
HD Graphics 520, 6200U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-21KHST0
16.33 (min: 7.91, max: 41.29) fps ∼5% -64%
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
HD Graphics 520, 6500U, Toshiba THNSNK256GCS8
27.7 fps ∼9% -40%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Radeon R7 M460, 6200U, Liteonit CV3-DE256
31.7 fps ∼10% -31%
1366x768 Medium Preset (sort by value)
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
GeForce 930MX, 7500U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1
46 fps ∼13%
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
HD Graphics 520, 6200U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-21KHST0
20.15 (min: 10.72, max: 47.29) fps ∼6% -56%
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
HD Graphics 520, 6500U, Toshiba THNSNK256GCS8
31.5 fps ∼9% -32%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Radeon R7 M460, 6200U, Liteonit CV3-DE256
38.9 fps ∼11% -15%
1280x720 Very Low Preset (sort by value)
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
GeForce 930MX, 7500U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1
63 fps ∼16%
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
HD Graphics 520, 6200U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-21KHST0
32.34 (min: 15.07, max: 58.14) fps ∼8% -49%
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
HD Graphics 520, 6500U, Toshiba THNSNK256GCS8
54.4 fps ∼14% -14%
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Radeon R7 M460, 6200U, Liteonit CV3-DE256
73.1 fps ∼18% +16%
low med. high ultra
BioShock Infinite (2013) 63464613fps
Metro: Last Light (2013) 433421fps
Batman: Arkham Knight (2015) 272311fps

Stress Test

For the first 15 seconds or so of full CPU load, the Envy x360 15t-w200 managed the full Turbo clock rates of 3.5 GHz across both cores. After that, however, frequencies quickly dropped to 3.2 GHz, where they remained mostly consistently for the duration of the test, never to rise again. GPU stress presents less of a problem, with a stable clock rate of 1019 MHz (the maximum possible) the entire time.

Combined stress greatly favors the GPU, which still manages a rock-solid 1019 MHz. However, the CPU throttles extremely heavily, first with one core at just 400 MHz and the other 3.1 GHz, and then, both cores at 400 MHz almost consistently. This is a (very conservative) TDP limitation rather than temperature; temperatures are never a problem for the Envy x360 15t, and they never rise above 60 °C on average for any extended period of time. Obviously, the Envy isn’t meant to be a workstation, but that never was its intended purpose to begin with. Such conditions in the real world are extremely unlikely.

Full CPU stress
Full CPU stress
Full GPU stress
Full GPU stress
Combined CPU + GPU stress
Combined CPU + GPU stress
Combined stress, after 2 minutes
Combined stress, after 2 minutes
CPU Clock (GHz) GPU Clock (MHz) Average CPU Temperature (°C) Average GPU Temperature (°C)
Prime95 Stress 3.2 - 60 -
FurMark Stress - 1019 - 59
Prime95 + FurMark Stress 0.4 1019 59 57

Emissions

System Noise

Even while under load, the Envy 15t-w200 only becomes moderately noisy; with a median load value of only 36 dB(A), it’s a pretty unobtrusive machine—though it does occasionally spike to a much more obvious 44 dB(A). While idling, it’s actually only slightly quieter, however, with values of 34.2 dB(A) and 33.9 dB(A) for maximum and median, respectively. It’s worth noting that the noise from the mechanical hard drive was clearly noticeable during operation, and that it can prove rather irritating in quieter environments (the hard drive is located close to the top of the base unit, which likely makes it more conspicuous).

When examining the comparison chart below, it’s important to note that variances in environmental noise ranging up to 1.2 dB(A) apply (in favor of the competition)—so it’s mostly meant as a rough point of reference.

Fan noise
Fan noise
The cooling fan
The cooling fan

Noise Level

Idle
33.8 / 33.9 / 34.2 dB(A)
Load
36 / 44 dB(A)
  red to green bar
 
 
30 dB
silent
40 dB(A)
audible
50 dB(A)
loud
 
min: dark, med: mid, max: light   BK Precision 732A (15 cm distance)   environment noise: 30.2 dB(A)
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
GeForce 930MX, 7500U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
HD Graphics 520, 6200U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-21KHST0
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
HD Graphics 520, 6500U, Toshiba THNSNK256GCS8
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
Radeon R7 M460, 6200U, Liteonit CV3-DE256
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
HD Graphics 520, 6200U, Sandisk X300 SD7SN6S-256G-1006
Noise
7%
3%
9%
8%
off / environment *
30.2
28.9
4%
31.2
-3%
29
4%
29.5
2%
Idle Minimum *
33.8
29.6
12%
32.8
3%
29
14%
29.5
13%
Idle Average *
33.9
29.6
13%
32.8
3%
29
14%
29.5
13%
Idle Maximum *
34.2
30.2
12%
33.8
1%
29
15%
29.6
13%
Load Average *
36
39
-8%
36.3
-1%
35.9
-0%
38.1
-6%
Load Maximum *
44
39.9
9%
36.3
17%
41
7%
38.2
13%

* ... smaller is better

Temperature

In spite of its relatively unobtrusive operation (in most cases), the 15t-w200 still manages extremely reasonable operating temperatures. While idling, we measured top/bottom averages of 22.9 °C / 23.2 °C, respectively, with a max reading of just 25.6 °C (room temperature: 20 °C). But even more impressively, under heavy sustained load, the machine still only produced average temperatures of 26.6 °C and 26.5 °C in those same regions, with a maximum of only 38 °C.

Thermal profile, top of base unit
Thermal profile, top of base unit
Thermal profile, underside
Thermal profile, underside
Max. Load
 28 °C32.6 °C26.2 °C 
 27.4 °C34 °C24.8 °C 
 21.4 °C21.4 °C23.2 °C 
Maximum: 34 °C
Average: 26.6 °C
25.4 °C33.2 °C38 °C
23.4 °C24.4 °C24.4 °C
23.8 °C23.6 °C22.2 °C
Maximum: 38 °C
Average: 26.5 °C
Power Supply (max.)  39 °C | Room Temperature 20 °C | Fluke 62 Mini IR Thermometer

Speakers

The Envy x360’s speakers are somewhat loud, but they lack bass more than we expected given their Bang & Olufsen pedigree and namesake. Post-processing is helpful but ultimately fruitless in producing the sort of sound which would satisfy audiophiles or anyone else listening to music for a sustained period of time. Still, the trebles are discernible, and some low frequencies are detectable with the bass slider pumped up—dynamic range and clarity are not really this system’s forte however.

Audio profile
Audio profile
dB(A) 0102030405060708090Deep BassMiddle BassHigh BassLower RangeMidsHigher MidsLower HighsMid HighsUpper HighsSuper Highs2038.738.238.72536.532.736.53130.234.430.24032.832.232.85032.931.832.96333.131.333.18034.730.534.710030293012528.727.728.716034.22934.220043.82743.825049.726.249.73155625.45640051.724.651.750051.623.851.663053.522.453.580059.422.859.4100059.523.159.5125064.923.464.9160059.323.559.32000572257250055.82255.8315056.62256.6400059.722.659.7500063.121.363.1630065.521.165.5800063.221.163.21000060.121.160.11250056.221.156.21600053.821.453.8SPL72.934.772.9N30.52.330.5median 56.2HP Envy x360 15t-w200median 22.8median 56.2Delta5.425.436.435.634.536.436.936.835.736.93636.736.33634.539.53634.53435.435.73435.736.834.835.734.540.135.234.536.636.836.536.639.838.937.839.839.333.129.939.345.637.229.145.658.548.530.158.565.155.428.765.164.755.22864.763.854.126.963.865.3552665.365.355.625.265.367.257.424.867.264.955.424.364.965.156.623.665.160.751.523.660.756.44723.356.450.942.523.150.949.642.123.149.652.644.622.952.657.847.722.857.856.248.622.856.255.142.822.655.149.741.222.449.745.535.922.245.5median 56.4Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISKmedian 47.7median 24.3median 56.49.482.99.4hearing rangehide median Pink Noise
HP Envy x360 15t-w200 audio analysis

(±) | speaker loudness is average but good (72.85 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(-) | nearly no bass - on average 15.8% lower than median
(-) | bass is not linear (16.6% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(+) | balanced mids - only 3.8% away from median
(±) | linearity of mids is average (9.5% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(+) | balanced highs - only 4.4% away from median
(+) | highs are linear (6.9% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(±) | linearity of overall sound is average (20.7% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 46% of all tested devices in this class were better, 7% similar, 46% worse
» The best had a delta of 11%, average was 22%, worst was 53%
Compared to all devices tested
» 46% of all tested devices were better, 8% similar, 45% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK audio analysis

(±) | speaker loudness is average but good (76.9 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(±) | reduced bass - on average 12.5% lower than median
(-) | bass is not linear (16.4% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(±) | higher mids - on average 8.2% higher than median
(+) | mids are linear (4.5% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(+) | balanced highs - only 2.7% away from median
(±) | linearity of highs is average (9.8% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(±) | linearity of overall sound is average (24% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 64% of all tested devices in this class were better, 8% similar, 28% worse
» The best had a delta of 11%, average was 22%, worst was 53%
Compared to all devices tested
» 65% of all tested devices were better, 8% similar, 27% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

Frequency Comparison (Checkbox selectable!)
Graph 1: Pink Noise 100% Vol.; Graph 2: Audio off

Energy Management

Power Consumption

For the most part, the numbers we recorded for power consumption are as expected, with the Envy situated in the middle of the pack of similarly-equipped machines. The sole outlier here, of course, is the HP Spectre x360 15, which features a 4K screen and thus consumes a much greater percentage of power during idle states specifically than its peers (under load, the differential proportion shrinks so as to make less of an impact). The Envy x360, meanwhile, does feature a somewhat higher-than-average 8.3 W while idling, but this is likely due to its inclusion of a mechanical hard drive versus the SSDs of the competition. The only other number worth paying attention to is the quite high load maximum value of 49.7 W, which is 23%+ higher than rivals equipped solely with integrated graphics. Still, the load average remains just 28.8 W.

Power Consumption
Off / Standbydarklight 0.3 / 0.5 Watt
Idledarkmidlight 5 / 8.3 / 7.8 Watt
Load midlight 28.8 / 49.7 Watt
 color bar
Key: min: dark, med: mid, max: light        Metrahit Energy
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
7500U, GeForce 930MX, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-24HWST1, IPS, 1920x1080, 15.6
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
6200U, HD Graphics 520, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-21KHST0, IPS, 1920x1080, 15.6
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
6500U, HD Graphics 520, Toshiba THNSNK256GCS8, IPS, 1920x1080, 15.6
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
6200U, Radeon R7 M460, Liteonit CV3-DE256, IPS, 1920x1080, 15.6
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
6200U, HD Graphics 520, Sandisk X300 SD7SN6S-256G-1006, IPS, 3840x2160, 15.6
Power Consumption
5%
9%
-6%
-34%
Idle Minimum *
5
4.3
14%
4.34
13%
4
20%
6.5
-30%
Idle Average *
8.3
8.2
1%
7.5
10%
7.5
10%
13.3
-60%
Idle Maximum *
7.8
9
-15%
8.4
-8%
8.1
-4%
15.1
-94%
Load Average *
28.8
29.8
-3%
30.4
-6%
40.8
-42%
30.8
-7%
Load Maximum *
49.7
36.4
27%
32.5
35%
57.3
-15%
38.5
23%

* ... smaller is better

Battery Life

Probably thanks in large part to the dedicated graphics adapter, the Envy x360 15t-w200 does not impress with regard to its battery runtime results. We recorded five hours and 20 minutes in our Wi-Fi Surfing benchmark, a figure which can only claim victory over the Dell Inspiron 15 5568 (4 hours, 59 minutes). The same applies to idling and load results, both of which see competitors topping the 15t-w200 by significant margins. Once again, the practicality of the Envy x360 15t is called into question with regard to its purported positioning as a convertible do-everything all-purpose notebook by pedestrian results where it truly matters most to the target market.

Classic Test
Classic Test
Readers Test
Readers Test
Surfing with Wi-Fi
Surfing with Wi-Fi
Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
10h 35min
NBC WiFi Websurfing Battery Test 1.3
5h 20min
Load (maximum brightness)
1h 29min
HP Envy x360 15t-w200
7500U, GeForce 930MX, 48 Wh
HP Pavilion 15-bk001ng x360
6200U, HD Graphics 520, 48 Wh
Dell Inspiron 15 5568
6500U, HD Graphics 520, 42 Wh
Lenovo Yoga 510-15ISK
6200U, Radeon R7 M460, 35 Wh
HP Spectre x360 15-ap012dx
6200U, HD Graphics 520, 65 Wh
Battery Runtime
25%
-11%
11%
24%
Reader / Idle
635
449
-29%
730
15%
705
11%
WiFi v1.3
320
401
25%
299
-7%
335
5%
431
35%
Load
89
93
4%
100
12%
113
27%

Pros

+ attractive and relatively rigid case
+ remains cool under load
+ rarely gets intrusively noisy
+ GPU performance does not throttle under load

Cons

- dim and dreary display
- highly reflective screen finish
- heavy and large for a convertible
- slow performance thanks to 5400 RPM hard drive
- short battery life
- PWM detected at low frequencies
- subpar clickpad
- difficult maintenance requiring significant disassembly to reach even the basics
- restrictive TDP-limited CPU performance under load

Verdict

In review: HP Envy x360 15t-w200. Test model provided by CUKUSA.com
In review: HP Envy x360 15t-w200. Test model provided by CUKUSA.com

Jack of all trades, master of none. The HP Envy x360 15t-w200 seems stuck in 2014; it wants so badly to carry forward the torch of all-purpose convertible that it seems blind to the fact that it’s a 15.6-inch machine weighing over 5 pounds and barely able to crack the 5-hour mark while web surfing. Its dim and dreary high-gloss LCD touchscreen is so overrun with reflections that it’s a pain to use in any bright environment—and to further exacerbate matters, tapping the screen results in a conspicuous bounce thanks to the unfortunate hinge tuning. Meanwhile, its sluggish 5400 RPM mechanical hard drive can’t keep up with the nimble solid-state storage of many similarly-priced competitors. And aftermarket upgrades aren’t as easy as they might seem seeing as significant disassembly is required to reach any of the replaceable components (including the aforementioned hard drive).

Jack of all trades, master of none; the HP Envy x360 15t-w200 seems stuck in 2014.

On the bright side, it’s a machine which manages to remain remarkably cool without becoming intrusively noisy (thanks in large part to what appears to be a very conservative firmware TDP limitation), and the case design is relatively attractive and solid, even in spite of the hybrid metal and plastic construction. Also, GPU performance seems unhindered by any degree of stress, maintaining stable clock rates even under sustained loads. Despite this short list of positive qualities, however, they are quickly and largely overshadowed by the above laundry list of negatives.

Users interested in a truly great convertible would do much better to consider (budget-permitting) either a higher-end HP Spectre x360, or perhaps after a bit of soul-searching, choose to sacrifice the multi-mode functionality and spring for a conventional notebook, for which far more options exist. After all, it’s 2016: isn’t it time we came to grips with the fact that we don’t really need our 15-inch notebook to fold over itself to become a tablet?

HP Envy x360 15t-w200 - 12/16/2016 v6
Steve Schardein

Chassis
70 / 98 → 71%
Keyboard
73%
Pointing Device
69%
Connectivity
50 / 80 → 63%
Weight
61 / 35-78 → 60%
Battery
84%
Display
77%
Games Performance
64 / 68 → 94%
Application Performance
80 / 87 → 92%
Temperature
96%
Noise
80%
Audio
60 / 91 → 66%
Camera
71 / 85 → 84%
Average
69%
76%
Convertible - Weighted Average

Pricecompare

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > HP Envy x360 15t-w200 Convertible Review
Steve Schardein, 2016-12-22 (Update: 2016-12-24)
Steve Schardein
Steve Schardein - Review Editor - @othersteve
In grade school, my first computer—an Apple IIGS—started it all for me. Later, in the nineties, if I wasn’t repairing computers for family and friends, I was busy cooking up nifty Visual Basic projects and playing PC games like Command & Conquer and Heroes of Might and Magic. Soon, much of my free time was spent moderating popular gaming forums and covering the industry for various websites. All the while, I never stopped repairing computers, and in 2006, I started a technology consulting company in Louisville, KY—Triple-S Computers—which I have been fortunate to nurture to great success by specializing in not only repairs, but also new machine consultations and purchasing, data recovery, and malware/security. And since 2012, I have proudly contributed many dozens of reviews to Notebookcheck, a site which I have long considered to be the ultimate authority on laptops and related technology. Today, I am truly living my dream: still a child at heart, ever-curious, constantly learning, and thankful to you, our readers.