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First benchmarks of the Acer Nitro 5 (2018): AMD Ryzen 7 2700U takes the Intel Core i7-7700HQ head on

The Acer Nitro 5 with AMD Ryzen on display at CES.
The Acer Nitro 5 with AMD Ryzen on display at CES.
Preliminary benchmarks of the AMD 'Raven Ridge' powered Acer Nitro 5 currently being showcased at CES 2018 show that the Ryzen 7 2700U can perform equivalently, if not better, than Intel's 7th generation 'Kaby Lake' Core i7-7700HQ. This is great news for multimedia enthusiasts as the Ryzen APUs offer a higher performance per dollar compared to the Intel equivalents.
The Nitro 5 is powered by a 4C/8T Ryzen 7 2700U.
The Nitro 5 is powered by a 4C/8T Ryzen 7 2700U.

AMD has been putting up an impressive show ever since it launched its Ryzen 7 Mobile APUs last year. We've already had a look at some performance metrics of the AMD Ryzen 5 2500U and came out impressed with its performance. We're now live at CES 2018 and Acer has just announced its new all-AMD Nitro 5 laptop featuring the AMD Ryzen 7 2700U CPU and the Radeon RX 560 GPU. We took this opportunity to run a few benchmarks on the new Nitro 5 to see how it fares in comparison with last year's model and more importantly, to understand how the Ryzen 7 2700U compares with respect to the hugely popular Intel Core i7-7700HQ CPU.

The Acer Nitro 5 on display was a pre-production model. While we could run CPU benchmarks such as Cinebench R15 and wPrime 2.0x, GPU benchmarks such as 3DMark kept crashing consistently. The CPU scores are exciting nonetheless and we have some good news for prospective buyers so let's dive straight into the scores.

CPU Benchmark: Cinebench R15

Acer Nitro 5 (Ryzen 7) running Cinebench R15
Acer Nitro 5 (Ryzen 7) running Cinebench R15

Traditionally, Ryzen Mobile has always been compared to the new Intel 8th generation 'Kaby Lake-R' U-series chips, given similar TDP values and they've proven themselves to be worthy competitors to Intel's latest offerings, especially in multi-core performance. The HQ-series CPUs from Intel generally have an advantage considering their clock speeds and higher TDPs. While the Core i7-7700HQ does have about a 10% lead in single-core and 5% lead in multi-core scores, it is good to see that the 15W Ryzen 7 2700U is performing very closely to the 45W Intel offering. Also, the Ryzen 7 trails slightly longer in the single-core test when compared to the 8th generation Intel Core i7-8550U, which has similar TDP but has a comfortable 26% lead in the multi-core score. For those who require capable multimedia performance without spending too much or requiring larger cooling mechanisms, the Ryzen 7 2700U is a godsend.

Note: The higher multi-core score for the Acer Nitro 5 with Core i7-7700HQ is with cooler booster on and the lower score is without the cooler booster. Single-core scores were not affected with or without cooler booster.

Cinebench R15
CPU Single 64Bit
Acer Swift 3 SF314-52G-89SL
Intel Core i7-8550U
167 Points ∼100% +15%
Acer Nitro 5 AN515-51-788E
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
162 Points ∼97% +12%
Acer Nitro 5 AN515-51-788E
Intel Core i7-7700HQ (CoolBoost on)
162 Points ∼97% +12%
Acer Nitro 5 (AMD Ryzen & Polaris)
AMD Ryzen 7 2700U
145 Points ∼87%
CPU Multi 64Bit
Acer Nitro 5 AN515-51-788E
Intel Core i7-7700HQ (CoolBoost on)
727 Points ∼100% +5%
Acer Nitro 5 AN515-51-788E
Intel Core i7-7700HQ
699 Points ∼96% +1%
Acer Nitro 5 (AMD Ryzen & Polaris)
AMD Ryzen 7 2700U
692 Points ∼95%
Acer Swift 3 SF314-52G-89SL
Intel Core i7-8550U
550 Points ∼76% -21%

CPU Benchmark: wPrime 2.0x

wPrime 2.0x is a CPU-heavy benchmark that puts multi-core performance to the test. Multi-core and floating point performance have always been AMD's forte and the Ryzen 7 2700U continues that legacy. The wPrime results for both 32 million and 1024 million operations give a clear 20% lead to the Ryzen 7 when compared to the 7700HQ and almost double the advantage over the 8550U, especially in the 1024m test. The scores indicate that programs designed to scale across multiple cores will immensely benefit from AMD even when compared to the higher watt Intel.

wPrime 2.0x
1024m
Acer Aspire 5 A517-51G-80L
GeForce MX150, 8550U, Micron 1100 MTFDDAV256TBN
394.042 s * ∼100% -46%
Asus Zenbook Pro UX550VE-DB71T
GeForce GTX 1050 Ti (Laptop), 7700HQ, Samsung PM961 NVMe MZVLW512HMJP
325 s * ∼82% -20%
Acer Nitro 5 (AMD Ryzen & Polaris)
Radeon RX 560 (Laptop), 2700U
270.1 s * ∼69%
32m
Asus Zenbook Pro UX550VE-DB71T
GeForce GTX 1050 Ti (Laptop), 7700HQ, Samsung PM961 NVMe MZVLW512HMJP
10.3 s * ∼100% -24%
Acer Aspire 5 A517-51G-80L
GeForce MX150, 8550U, Micron 1100 MTFDDAV256TBN
9.971 s * ∼97% -20%
Acer Nitro 5 (AMD Ryzen & Polaris)
Radeon RX 560 (Laptop), 2700U
8.3 s * ∼81%

* ... smaller is better

The 2018 Acer Nitro 5 presents a very good value for money proposition considering the amount of CPU performance it packs. The discrete Radeon RX 560, while still a Polaris GPU, can perform on par with the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 at the very least. We wish we could have got some GPU scores as well for a more holistic idea of what to expect from a Ryzen + Radeon combo. Nevertheless, we will continue to see Ryzen Mobile proliferate in the coming months. As of now, the only other competition it faces is from the new Intel-AMD 'Kaby Lake-G' chips. We will do a comprehensive comparison once we get our hands on them so watch this space.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2018 01 > First benchmarks of the Acer Nitro 5 (2018): AMD Ryzen 7 2700U takes the Intel Core i7-7700HQ head on
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2018-01- 9 (Update: 2018-01- 9)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam - News Editor
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.