Review HP 620 Notebook

Sebastian Jentsch, 12/09/2010

Retro Office. A good office companion doesn't have to have an Intel Core Processor. The HP 620 with the old Pentium generation represents traditional values, such as a matt TFT, good ergonomics and many interfaces. Nevertheless, the 440 euro colleague isn't perfect.

HP 620 WT092EA: Can the technically obsolete Pentium Dual Core T4500 sustain in the World of Core i3/i5 processors?
HP 620 WT092EA: Can the technically obsolete Pentium Dual Core T4500 sustain in the World of Core i3/i5 processors?

Christmas has let the run on notebooks start up again. The majority are in a price range of below 500 euro, since these devices are affordable for almost everyone. Additionally, the devices' quality has been modified so strongly that you don't have to expect the lousiest plastic bummers in the 450 euro range.

Candidates that basically represent solid 15.6 inch devices are found in HP's business range, HP 620. These are the manufacturer's lowest priced devices based on 2008 Penryn processors. We've had the optically identical HP 625 (AMD Athlon II P320) in review. Now we will focus on the Pentium Dual-Core T4500's (2x2.30 GHz) capabilities and the general office qualities like inputs, display, ergonomics and mobility. Is the Pentium T4500 the better choice, contrarily to the AMD Athlon II P320 (2.1 GHz) in the HP 625 (WS829EA/WS835EA)? An important question, because the latter is available for starting at 349 euro without an operating system.

Case

Plain but resistant surfaces
Plain but resistant surfaces
A bulky, but solid case
A bulky, but solid case

HP proves that an office laptop hasn't got to be poorly manufactured at all. The manufacturer uses angular shapes that don't even attempt to hide the bulky size. The case is beveled towards the wrist-rest by a few millimeters (slight tilt, wedge-shape).

The monochrome looking case components, with one exception, are made of an uncoated plastic in silver and gray. The 2.50 kilogram case is suitable for mobile use with its resistance, as well as for the desk with its seriousness (matt TFT). Our hands feel a textured surface on the work area and lid. The plastic has grip. Fingerprints and greasy spots aren't left behind. They only find retreat on the plastic key bezel.

The solid case makes a good impression with even gaps. Two hands can twist the case, but the deformation is very marginal. The wrist-rest is as solid as a rock everywhere. The same applies for the key bed (even above the DVD drive).

We can twist the lid more easily, but the leeway is limited. The lid's surface can easily be dented in the center. The hinges keep the lid firmly in place. Although they are pulled tight, we only need one hand for opening. The hinges fit tight in their niche. The maximum opening angle of 130 degrees is sufficient for a use on the lap.

We can't depress the base plate evidently anywhere. The easily removable plate bids upgrade options: hard disk, RAM (DDR3 SDRAM, 2 bays) and WLAN module (mini PCI Express). The Intel CPU is also inserted.

Connectivity

Upgrading: ExpressCard34
Upgrading: ExpressCard34

 

The interfaces compile on the case's left side, where the fan is. The Ethernet port for the network cable, the VGA/HDMI port for external monitors, a USB 2.0 port for peripherals and an ExpressCard34 slot for expansion cards are found here.

Thus, the price conscious buyer doesn't have to live without HDMI or ExpressCard34. This is a big advantage in comparison to many budget opponents, like Lenovo's G560, Samsung's R530 or HP's Compaq Presario CQ62. Additional interfaces, such as USB 3.0 or FireWire can be retrofitted via ExpressCard34.

The headphone out, microphone in and cardreader adorn the case's front. The label denotes the supported formats (SD/MMC only). There aren't any ports on the rear. This is very deterring for a permanent desktop use. All cables gather at the visible, lateral sides. In particular the unwieldy HDMI/VGA cable or the USB ports aligned on the front could impair the use of a mouse on both left and right.

All internal devices (WLAN, LAN, DVD drive, audio, modem, microphone, webcam, WLAN status LED, USB port, ExpressCard, cardreader, can be easily disabled in the bios (mouse controlled), which might save a bit of energy or thwart system conflicts.

Front: Cardreader SD/MMC, headphone, microphone
Front: Cardreader SD/MMC, headphone, microphone
Left: Kensington, VGA, AC, Ethernet, HDMI, USB 2.0, ExpressCard34
Left: Kensington, VGA, AC, Ethernet, HDMI, USB 2.0, ExpressCard34
Rear: No connections
Rear: No connections
Right: Two USB 2.0s, modem, DVD multi.burner
Right: Two USB 2.0s, modem, DVD multi.burner

Communication

The wireless module listens to the name, Ralink RT3090 and supports the latest transmission standard, draft-n. Bluetooth is installed on the same chip and complies with the new 3.0 standard. If you'd rather use a cable, you unfortunately won't have the maximum bandwidth of 1000 MBit/s. The Realtek PCIe FE Family Controller isn't apt for Gigabit Ethernet. To make up, a modem (LSI HDA 56K v.9) is installed with which faxes can be sent via the analog connection.

Security

While HP ProBooks can serve with a TPM module, the low priced business category has to do without. We couldn't find any tools like HP's 3D DriveGuard (drive head parking) and Disk Sanitizer (deletes data completely) (exists on HP 625).

Supplies

DVDs aren't included in the HP 620's box. Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit is on a recovery partition and should be secured on DVDs via HP's Recovery Manager in the event of a hard disk crash. There is only a warranty card and quick start instructions in the carton.

Warranty

The warranty is limited to a 12 month send in service (pickup and return service only in selected countries). Upgrades to three years, including a next day pickup, is available for 268 euro.

Input Devices

Keyboard

The keys have a crisp and clear pressure point, as well as a good keystroke. The click noise is pliable and thus quiet. The key size can basically be described as firm. Upon closer examination, a slight yielding is noticed, especially on the right area (above the DVD drive).

The accuracy isn't very high on the even keys (no concavity). In addition, the keys have a comparatively loose mounting, which makes fast orientation difficult when sweeping over them.

The illuminated caps lock key is well considered. Alike the WLAN key, there is a tiny LED directly on the key. Thus, when someone suddenly gets upset about capitals, the culprit is found quickly. In return, the 15.6 incher doesn't have any status LEDs, not even for the hard disk.

A number pad has been omitted in favor of a large keyboard. The right area is only adorned with PGUP/PGDOWN, DEL, HOME and END keys. This is pleasant because these keys are usually located somewhere on the layout's right. The separate volume keys in the utmost lower left are just as pleasant. In our opinion, the keyboard can be classified as consumer office suitable, but not good enough for business.

Touchpad

The mouse replacement is even with the wrist-rest and can be used quickly. The surface, just like the keys, is fairly smooth. The touchpad has a vertical and horizontal scroll bar (marked). The horizontal scroll field is disabled in state of delivery, but can be enabled via mouse properties.

The keys emit a muffled click. They require a fairly high force due to an almost non-existing keystroke feedback. Thus, key usage is disagreeable. This mouse pad can't hold a candle to the feedback powerful touchpads in ProBooks or EliteBooks.

Keyboard in detail
Keyboard in detail
Touchpad
Touchpad

Display

HP installs a WXGA screen with a resolution of 1366x768 pixels (16:9). The LG display (LP156WH2-TLRB) has definitely been AR coated. Thus, much to the delight of office users, there won't be any reflections. The contrast of 135:1 is extremely low, but typical for an office laptop. The assessed black value is 1.64 cd/m2. This has a negative impact on color and bright/dark contrast perception. Black isn't deep black and there will always be a grayish cast. Colors aren't vivid and bright.

The LG screen doesn't have any advantages in terms of color spectrum either. The screen only covers about half the AdobeRGB (t). It looks better for sRGB (t), although many color nuances aren't reproduced. In comparison to good consumer displays, such as in Sony's Vaio VPC-EB3Z1E (t), the HP 620 has to admit defeat.

ICC HP620 vs. AdobeRGB (t)
ICC HP620 vs. AdobeRGB (t)
ICC HP620 vs. sRGB (t)
ICC HP620 vs. sRGB (t)
ICC HP620 vs. Sony Vaio EB3Z1E (t)
ICC HP620 vs. Sony Vaio EB3Z1E (t)
210
cd/m²
216
cd/m²
202
cd/m²
194
cd/m²
222
cd/m²
203
cd/m²
204
cd/m²
209
cd/m²
201
cd/m²
Information
Gossen Mavo-Monitor
Maximum: 222 cd/m²
Average: 206.8 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 87 %
Center on Battery: 222 cd/m²
Black: 1.64 cd/m²
Contrast: 135:1
Distribution of brightness

The display distributes the brightness evenly over the screen (87%). So, the LED backlight's deviations are very slight. The brightest and dimmest area only have a difference of 28 cd/m2. Overall, the luminosity is viable with 207 cd/m2.

The HP 620's display is adequately AR coated for outdoor use. There aren't any disturbing reflections. However, the just only good brightness occasionally provides for viewing problems in direct sunlight, which also depends on the viewing angle. The screen then turns too dark for working effortlessly. The simplest solution would be to look for shade.

Frontal view (direct sun)
Frontal view (direct sun)
Lateral view (direct sun)
Lateral view (direct sun)
Lateral view (direct sun, different angle)
Lateral view (direct sun, different angle)

The narrow viewing angle stability doesn't contribute to a good rating for the LG screen. Color and brightness falsifications already turn up at slight angle deviations (about 40 degrees) on the horizontal plane. Image deviations already turn up at 10 degrees vertically. Larger horizontal angles would be advantageous for an office notebook, but can't be expected from any notebook in this price range.

Viewing angles: HP 620 WT092EA
Viewing angles: HP 620 WT092EA

Performance

An entry level dual core processor is supplied at an entry level price. The Pentium T4500 (2x2.3 GHz) has only a 1 MB level 2 cache in comparison to its Core 2 Duo colleague (2-6 MB). It also can only use fewer energy savings functions (disabled). The T4500 is based on the Penryn core, released onto the market in 2008, and is out-dated in face of the latest Arrandale CPUs. The new Arrandales however again have a Pentium chip in the price list, but the models are called P6XXX.

A 2048 MB DDR3 SDRAM (1 module, one slot unoccupied) supports the T4500. The graphics GMA 4500MHD incorporated in the chipset (Intel GL 40) is capable of DirectX 10. It doesn't have a dedicated graphics memory, instead it uses a part dynamically from the RAM (CANNOT be set in bios). The Intel chip can decode HD videos (formats: AVC/VC2/MPEG2) with the integrated video coding features, and thus unburden the CPU.

System info CPUZ CPU
System info CPUZ Cache
System info CPUZ Mainboard
System info CPUZ RAM
System info CPUZ RAM SPD
System info GPUZ
DPC Latency Checker: Idle OK
DPC Latency Checker: WLAN on/off short latencies
System information: HP 620 WT092EA
Pentium T 4500 (2x2.3 GHz): doesn't compute much faster than the AMD Athlon II P320 (2x2.1 GHz)
Pentium T 4500 (2x2.3 GHz): doesn't compute much faster than the AMD Athlon II P320 (2x2.1 GHz)

The Pentium T4500 (2x2.3 GHz) is in the dual cores' Pentium P6100 (2.13 GHz) and Athlon II P320 (2.1 GHz) performance category. They compute faster than cheaper single core notebook processors, the like of Celeron M 900 and AMD V120 (both 2.2 GHz). We would like to demonstrate the difference to the Athlon II P320, since the almost identically constructed sister model, HP 625 is already available for starting at 349 euro (without Windows!). Is it worth the surcharge in comparison to Intel's T4500?

Cinebench R10's single core rendering test ends with 2538 points for the T4500. The Athlon II P320 achieves 2056 points, which is due to the lower clock rate. Low-end CPUs of the AMD V-Series V120 (1858), Celeron-M 585 (2062) don't show a much poorer performance.

The T4500's advantage (4747 points) remains when computing with both cores (Cinebench R10's multi core rendering). The Athlon II P320 reaches 3959 points. However, this is not a difference that would vindicate a surcharge of 50 or 100 euro. Even the low clocking Core i3-330M (2.16 GHz) isn't much faster: A typical Core i3-330M notebook achieves 5000 points.

3.3
Windows 7 Experience Index
Processor
Calculations per second
5.8
Memory (RAM)
Memory operations per second
5.5
Graphics
Desktop performance for Windows Aero
3.4
Gaming graphics
3D business and gaming graphics
3.3
Primary hard disk
Disk data transfer rate
5.6
Cinebench R10 Rendering Single 32Bit
2306
Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 32Bit
4337
Cinebench R10 Shading 32Bit
983
Cinebench R10 Rendering Single CPUs 64Bit
2538 Points
Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 64Bit
4747 Points
Cinebench R10 Shading 64Bit
1045 Points
Cinebench R11.5 OpenGL 64Bit
1.01 fps
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Multi 64Bit
1.25 Points
Help
PC Mark
PCMark 053983 points
PCMark Vantage3576 points
Help

PCMark Vantage assessed a score of 3576. This rate visualizes the PC system's application speed under consideration of all components. 3800 points are quite high for a Penryn system without a graphics card.

Users won't be worse off with an AMD system based on Athlon II P320  (e.g. HP Compaq Presario CQ62-A04sg or HP 625 WS835EA). Both of these examples achieve 3567, respectively 3388 points without dedicated graphics. The AMD counterpart is therefore at most five percent slower. This can be neglected.

First low-end systems, such as MSI's CR630-V1225FD (V120: 2360 points) score fewer points in system performance. A look at expensive Core i3 systems shows that the HP 620 is no longer competitive: Lenovo's IdeaPad G560 (4266), Fujitsu's LifeBook A530 (4676) or MSI's CR620 (4486).

The HP 620's performance is sufficient for home use with the T4500 and superior to low-end single core systems. If you'd like to save a bit of money, you'll get a comparable performance with the Athlon II P320.

3D Mark
3DMark 031759 points
3DMark 051106 points
3DMark 06
 1280x1024
622 points
Help
Seagate Momentus 5400.6 ST9320325AS
Transfer Rate Minimum: 33 MB/s
Transfer Rate Maximum: 72.1 MB/s
Transfer Rate Average: 55 MB/s
Access Time: 18.5 ms
Burst Rate: 78.2 MB/s
CPU Usage: 1 %

A 320 GB hard disk from Seagate is installed in the HP 620 (ST9320325AS). The 5400 rpm HDD is very quiet, even during intense read head activity. The 320 GB are read with a leisurely 55 MB/s in sequential read (HD Tune). This below average rate is improved by a fairly high burst rate. The burst rate (reading the HDD cache in one second) is 78.2 MB/s. This leads to an acceptable HDD score of 3316 points for a 5400 rpm HDD (PCMark Vantage sub score).

Seagate ST9320325AS
Seagate ST9320325AS
HDTune: 55 MB/s read
HDTune: 55 MB/s read
CrystalDisk Mark 3.0: 65 MB/s
CrystalDisk Mark 3.0: 65 MB/s

Emissions

Air outlet
Air outlet

System Noise

The HP 620's fan never stops work, not even in idle after the noise level has dropped to 31.1 dB(A). As in all HP devices, the option "Fan Always On while AC Power" is standardly enabled in the bios. We disabled it partly for the test. However, it didn't silent the fan. In view of the low noise in this state, it's not necessary either.

In opposition to its sister model, HP 625, where the basic noise level of the 7200 rpm HDD is determined, the HP 620's constant basic noise is almost inaudible. Short-term calculations or an undemanding use with web surfing only perturbs the fan temporarily. It then slowly turns up to 34.2 dB(A) for a few seconds, only to fall back to the basic level again.

The system noise only increases to 37.9 dB(A) in the 3D benchmarks. However, that's not yet the maximum. Under full load (stress test), the fan turns up to 50.4 dB(A). The noise isn't permanent – a clear decrease to 31.7 dB(A) can be observed every 45 seconds. The level's repeatedly extreme fluctuation is utmost peeving. Nevertheless, it only occurs when the CPU is under constant full load. Thus, office users don't have to be deterred by this during surfing or typing.

Noise Level

Idle 31.2 / 31.1 / 34.2 dB(A)
HDD 31.4 dB(A)
DVD 34.8 / dB(A)
Load 37.9 / 50.4 dB(A)
 
    30 dB
silent
40 dB
audible
50 dB
loud
 
min: , med: , max:    Voltcraft sl-320 (15 cm distance)
Stress test: The CPU heat up to a maximum of 88 degrees Celsius
Stress test: The CPU heat up to a maximum of 88 degrees Celsius

Temperature

The idle temperatures provide a perfect example. The wrist-rest are within a blue range with about 28 degrees. The base plate can selectively achieve a maximum of 30 degrees. Our temperature chart shows unalarming rates that comply with the low idle power consumption (maximum energy saving options).

This picture changes drastically under high load. The CPU's 35 watts as well as a few watts of the Intel GMA 4500MHD has to be discharged suddenly at the same time. The left work area reached up to 44 degrees in the stress test. The base plate reaches up to 47 degrees in the vent's vicinity. But no one will burn holes in their cloths. Due to the large blue fields with rates of below 30 degrees, the average rates are around 30, respectively 29 degrees.

Max. Load
 37.5 °C27.8 °C21.7 °C 
 44 °C31.2 °C21.8 °C 
 31.3 °C27.2 °C24.2 °C 
 
21.4 °C24.9 °C47 °C
21.9 °C27 °C42.1 °C
26.7 °C24.7 °C28 °C
Maximum: 44 °C
Average: 29.6 °C
 Maximum: 47 °C
Average: 29.3 °C
Power Supply (max.)  45.1 °C | Room Temperature 19.6 °C | Voltcraft IR-360

Loudspeakers

Office notebooks are scarcely music connoisseurs.  This also applies to the stereo loudspeaker located above the HP 620's keyboard. The sound emphasizes the midranges intensely and neglects the basses completely. The trebles have a good share, but that doesn't improve the thin sound either. The undemanding office worker will be satisfied, but no one will likely want to listen to their favorite music permanently.

At least the sound remains undistorted in maximum volume. The sound enhancements (bass emphasize, virtual surround) don't make a clear change. The volume is adequate for a 15.6 incher. If you'd like to connect an external sound system, there is a 3.5 mm jack on the right. This socket seems static free in our audio test (audio test only – no measurement).

Battery Life

The HP leaves our test with a good battery life. The user can enjoy a DVD movie for 2:46 minutes (149 minutes) (HP 625: 2:29 hours). It's almost four hours for surfing on the internet (WLAN test: 220 minutes). The HP 625 based on AMD only achieves nearly three hours.

If you think you can extract more by typing in Word with the lowest brightness, you'll be well served with five hours (308 minutes) (HP 625: 215 minutes). This is a very good idle runtime for a 15.6 incher with a 4200 mAh battery (47 Wh). Core i3 opponents, such as the Lenovo IdeaPad G560-M277QGE or the Fujitsu LifeBook A5300MF101DE, aren't better with about five hours (idle) and only achieve WLAN runtimes of nearly three hours.

Charging: 103 min.
Charging: 103 min.
DVD: 166 min.
DVD: 166 min.
WLAN: 220 min.
WLAN: 220 min.
Idle: 308 min.
Idle: 308 min.
Load: 83 min.
Load: 83 min.
Battery runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
5h 08min
WiFi Surfing
3h 40min
DVD
2h 46min
Load (maximum brightness)
1h 23min

The HP 620 shows itself quite modest – quality that we wouldn't have expected due to the 35 watt CPU, Pentium T4500. When there's nothing to do in idle and all energy saving options are enabled (luminosity lowest setting), then the energy requirement is merely 10.3 watts. An average of 14.0 watts is realistic in idle (balanced profile, standard mode). The sister model, HP 625, has an equally low idle power appetite of only 12.9 watts.

We determine the maximum power consumption in the stress test with Prime95 and Furmark. The multimeter indicates 48 watts (HP 625: 52 watts). The 65 watt adapter (265 grams) is adequately sized.

Power consumption

Off / Standby 0.1 / 0.6 Watt
Idle 10.3 / 13.9 / 16 Watt
Load 32.1 / 47.9 Watt
 
Key: min: , med: , max:         Voltcraft VC 960

Verdict

HP 620 WT092EA: Matt and inexpensive companion for the summer and for simple office tasks
HP 620 WT092EA: Matt and inexpensive companion for the summer and for simple office tasks

Hewlett Packard has already had a 15.6 incher with basic office equipment in its program for a while. A matt TFT, a high-end and stable case, a good keyboard layout and low emissions speak for a pleasant office use. The battery life of almost four hours doesn't have to hide from the Core i3 office rivals. Contrarily, many Core i3 systems only reach three hours. The matt and acceptably bright TFT is inviting for a stay on the terrace next summer.

The Pentium Dual-Core T4500 (2x2.30 GHz) no longer plays in the first office league, but at any rate in the third. We only find insignificant differences in computing performance, and hardly any in system performance, in comparison to the Athlon II P320 (2x2.10 GHz). If you want to save a bit of money, you'll not make a wrong decision with the HP 625 (Athlon II P320). Merely the AMD system's battery life is about an hour shorter.

Buyers don't have to live without HDMI, Bluetooth 3.0, WLAN draft n and ExpressCard34 in the HP 620. It's even possible to receive and send faxes via the installed modem (not in HP 625).

The average waste heat is very low with and without load. The system noise is only unpleasant with a harsh 50 dB(A) in cases of extreme stress. The keyboard with a clear pressure point and stroke length proves to be difficult in terms of accuracy. However, the typist can accommodate to this. The difficult to use mouse pad keys (lack of keystroke feedback, needs a lot of force) are highly unsatisfying.

The HP 620 (WT092EA) is available with an operating system and 320 GB hard disk starting for 440 euro. Unlike the test system, the systems in retail can also include a faster 7200 rpm hard disk.

By courtesy of ...
In Review: HP 620 WT092EA, by courtesy of:
In Review:  HP 620 WT092EA

Specifications

HP 620 WT092EA

:: Processor
:: Mainboard
Intel GL40
:: Memory
2048 MB, PC3-10600
:: Graphics adapter
:: Display
15.6 inch 16:9, 1366x768 pixel, LP156WH2-TLRB, glossy: no
:: Harddisk
Seagate Momentus 5400.6 ST9320325AS, 320 GB 5400 rpm
:: Soundcard
Intel 82801IB ICH9 HD Audio Controller
:: Connections
1 Express Card 34mm, 3 USB 2.0, 1 VGA, 1 HDMI, LSI HDA 56K v.92 Modem, 1 Kensington Lock, Audio Connections: line-out, microphone, Card Reader: SD/MMC,
:: Networking
Realtek PCIe FE Family Controller GigaBit (10/100/1000MBit), Ralink RT3090 802.11b/g/n WiFi Adapter (b g n ), 3.0+HS auf Ralink Motorola Bluetooth
:: Optical drive
HP CDDVDW TS-L633N
:: Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 27.5 x 371.8 x 249.6
:: Weight
2.498 kg Power Supply: 0.265 kg
:: Battery
47 Wh Lithium-Ion, 10.8V 4200mAh
:: Operating System
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit
:: Additional features
Webcam: 2.0MP, 12 Months Warranty

 

It has an average weight with 265 grams. The power cable (not in picture) has a length of 1.80 meters.
It has an average weight with 265 grams. The power cable (not in picture) has a length of 1.80 meters.
Neither Windows DVDs nor driver DVDs are included.
Neither Windows DVDs nor driver DVDs are included.
HP 625 WS835EA: Solid typing performance with a matt display.
HP 625 WS835EA: Solid typing performance with a matt display.
HP 625 WS835EA: Serious looks, but stable build.
HP 625 WS835EA: Serious looks, but stable build.
The HP 625 (WS835EA) is a basic device from the manufacturer.
The HP 625 (WS835EA) is a basic device from the manufacturer.
Driven by an out-dated Pentium Dual Core T4500, the performance reserves are small.
Driven by an out-dated Pentium Dual Core T4500, the performance reserves are small.
Retailers don't have to worry about shortages in view of workmanship.
Retailers don't have to worry about shortages in view of workmanship.
The solid plastic case is abundantly thick but stable.
The solid plastic case is abundantly thick but stable.
The keys show their light effects in the dark.
The keys show their light effects in the dark.
This is the only glossy surface. Visually, the work surface makes a reserved impression.
This is the only glossy surface. Visually, the work surface makes a reserved impression.
The hinges are extremely sunken and hold the lid firmly.
The hinges are extremely sunken and hold the lid firmly.
Details, like the webcam, have been placed inconspicuously.
Details, like the webcam, have been placed inconspicuously.
The front accommodates cardreader and audio sockets.
The front accommodates cardreader and audio sockets.
There is also an (analog) modem installed beside HDMI and eSATA.
There is also an (analog) modem installed beside HDMI and eSATA.
The matt display will delight office users or outdoor surfers. The correlating brightness is adequate.
The matt display will delight office users or outdoor surfers. The correlating brightness is adequate.
The battery can be removed for permanent desktop use.
The battery can be removed for permanent desktop use.
It supplies up to nearly four hours of mobility with 47 watt hours.
It supplies up to nearly four hours of mobility with 47 watt hours.
The base plate is first loosened and then simply pushed open.
The base plate is first loosened and then simply pushed open.
The disk is protected by a thin aluminum plate.
The disk is protected by a thin aluminum plate.
The components, including the Intel CPU (inserted), are now accessible.
The components, including the Intel CPU (inserted), are now accessible.
This is the half size WLAN module in the mini PCI slot, which also includes Bluetooth 3.0.
This is the half size WLAN module in the mini PCI slot, which also includes Bluetooth 3.0.
The 65 watt adapter is apt for the maximum power consumption of 48 watts.
The 65 watt adapter is apt for the maximum power consumption of 48 watts.

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Pro

+AR coated TFT
+ExpressCard 34 & modem
+Solid case
+Resistant surfaces
+Good battery life
+Lowe power consumption
+Low system noise in office mode
+Clearly arranged key layout
 

Contra

-Inaccurate typing feel
-Mouse keys with poor feedback
-Contrast weak TFT
-High system noise under load

Shortcut

What we like

Matt display and stable case combined with a good battery life.

What we miss

If the fingers could glide over the keys a bit more accurately and the mouse keys would have a clearer keystroke feedback, then the perfect office typing machine would be created.

What surprises us

A four hour battery life with an old Pentium and rather low battery capacity – not bad.

The competition

For less than 500 euro: Fujitsu LifeBook A530: built well with Core i3; Lenovo G560: I3 without Windows starting at 430 euro; Samsung R530: extremely quiet with T4500; HP 625: identical case but with AMD; HP Compaq Presario CQ62: consumer with similar performance.

Rating

HP 620 WT092EA
12/06/2010 v2
Sebastian Jentsch

Chassis
84%
Keyboard
86%
Pointing Device
82%
Connectivity
70%
Weight
81%
Battery
81%
Display
73%
Games Performance
48%
Application Performance
76%
Temperature
82%
Noise
79%
Add Points
84%
Average
77%
80%
Office *
Weighted Average

> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Archive of our own reviews > Review HP 620 Notebook
Author: Sebastian Jentsch, 2010-12- 9 (Update: 2013-06- 6)