Review Fujitsu LifeBook A530 Notebook

Sebastian Jentsch, 08/28/2010

Futureproof. 2010 Intel Core on the cheap? If you're looking for an office notebook with current hardware, good connectivity, matte TFT and acceptable battery life, you should call in at Fujitsu. In particular the ergonomics are inspiring.

Fujitsu Lifebook A530 (A5300MF101DE): not the cheapest but a good office laptop with Core i3-350M
Fujitsu Lifebook A530 (A5300MF101DE): not the cheapest but a good office laptop with Core i3-350M

Are you looking for a cheap office laptop? Well then, good look with the search; you're almost snowed under with offers. Even from 350 Euro fully-equipped 15.6-inch devices are to be had. In the price range up to 500 Euro, there are AMD's Athlon/Turion processors or Intel's Pentium dual-core or respectively Celeron. Also Core 2 Duo processors from the generation up to 2009 can be found here (e.g. Lenovo G530 or HP Compaq 615).

Of course, you don't want yesterday's technology, right (Core 2 Duo, Penryn)? How about the 2010 Intel Generation? If you can open your wallet a bit further and spend around 550 Euro, the Core i3 laptops are sure to catch your eye. A cheap system of this kind is the Lenovo G560, which is available with the Core i3-350M from 440 Euro (without Windows operating system).

If you're put off by the glossy display of the Lenovo G560, you might rummage a little further and you'll almost inevitably come across our test device Fujitsu Lifebook A530 in the Core i3-350M variant (A5300MF101DE). With Windows 7 Professional and a matte display the 15.6-incher seems to be a lucrative offer for future-oriented office users. Find out in our extensive test report if we can confirm this.

Case

Loudspeaker
Loudspeaker
Hand rest
Hand rest
Hinge
Hinge

Visually, the Fujitsu Lifebook A530 is fitted with plastic. There are, apart from the hand rest area, no lacquered surfaces. However, we don't just want to talk about absolute austerity, as the silver working environment and the white keys clearly relax the visuals and give the 15.6-incher a pleasant look. The details are, on the whole, somewhat more imaginative than those of the Core i3 competitor, Lenovo's G560. The loudspeakers have a perforated grid, the power key illuminates blue and the Lifebook lettering above the keyboard is silver.

The surface on the display lid and the working environment are made from a non-slip matte plastic. Fingerprints no more than subtly remain on the slightly rubberised lid. The base plate is made from a rough plastic.

The case is characterised by very good pressure stability. The working area, keyboard and base plate can't be dented anywhere. Even the base plate above the optical drive is pressure-resistant. With two hands, the base unit can only be distorted with a lot of force.

The lid is held firmly in position by the taut hinges. No see-sawing is present. The joints give a stable and durable impression and they sit in position extremely sturdily. The maximum opening angle of around 145 degrees is more than enough for use on the lap.

Connectivity

ExpressCard54 slot
ExpressCard54 slot

The connections are concentrated on the left side of the case, where the air outlet is also to be found. Here users will find the obligatory Ethernet-RJ45 port for the network cable, the VGA port for the external TFT and two USB 2.0 ports for peripherals. Also the price-conscious user doesn't have to do without HDMI, which is a great advantage over the cheap competitor, the Lenovo G560. An external TFT or also a TV can be connected via HDMI.

A highlight is the ExpressCard54 slot for upgrade cards on the left side. With this extra interfaces can be added, e.g. USB 3.0 or FireWire. The appropriate cards are commercially available for this, and ExpressCard34 cards also fit in the slot.

The headphone output and the microphone input grace front of the case. The clear inscription points out the supported formats (SD/MS/MS Pro/MMC). On the rear there are no connections apart from the Kensington Lock. For substantial use on the desk it's a shame that all cables are gathered on the visible sides. Even the cumbersome HDMI cable or the arranged USB ports could limit the area of an external mouse.

Front: headphones, microphone, card reader
Front: headphones, microphone, card reader
Left: VGA, Ethernet, HDMI, 2 x USB 2.0, ExpressCard54
Left: VGA, Ethernet, HDMI, 2 x USB 2.0, ExpressCard54
Rear: Kensington Lock
Rear: Kensington Lock
Right: USB 2.0, Kensington Lock, DVD burner, AC
Right: USB 2.0, Kensington Lock, DVD burner, AC

The tools on our test device include a fast Atheros AR9285 wireless card (IEEE 802.11b/g/n). Also Bluetooth is on board of the low-cost office laptop. If you prefer to plug in a cable, the full bandwidth of the Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller is available. The LAN adapter therefore supports Gigabit Ethernet.

Input Devices

Keyboard

The keyboard of the 15.6-inch device belongs to the office-suitable category. When typing the keys have a clear pressure point and a sufficient stroke length, yet the stroke is soft. The typing feeling could be too spongy for some users. A small problem (as a matter of practice) is the planar surface of the keys. Our fingers don't instinctively find the middle of the key and instead they are caught slipping on the hard edges of the next key.

The keys in an aluminium hull (splash-proof protection) are firm and only minimally give way above the optical drive. For a demanding user, the gray and rather less visible inscription of the keys is worthy of criticism.

The layout of the large Enter-, Shift- and Backspace-keys is generous. Fujitsu has only squeezed the arrow keys under the Shift key and halved their size.  Even so they are offset a free space. A number pad in the standard layout is present and facilitates input of numbers and use of a calculator.

Touchpad

Why Fujitsu deploys a touchpad in minute netbook dimensions remains a mystery to us. It's set it in clear recess and seems like a child's toy (short stroke) with its rickety, loud keys. The surface is sensitive into the outer regions. Both mouse keys are sunk, which has a negative effect on smooth use. Thumbs stumble against the lower border (part of the hand rest).

The multi-touch pad (Synaptics V7.2) can be used with two fingers. Zooming or scrolling with two fingers is deactivated by default, just like horizontal and vertical scrolling (lower and right scrollbar, one finger). Customers should therefore directly navigate with the mouse and use the best settings for themselves.

Keyboard
Keyboard
Number pad
Number pad
Touchpad
Touchpad

Display

Fujitsu deploys a WXGA panel with a native resolution of 1366 x 768 pixels. The 16:9 display (LP156WH2-TLBA) is clearly anti-glare, meaning there are as good as no reflections at all. The contrast extremely low at just 144:1 but this is unsurprising for an office laptop. An estimated 90 percent of our test devices don't exceed 200:1. The measured black value is 1.4 cd/m². The widescreen display therefore doesn't show dark areas in a deep black. A grey shimmer remains present.

192
cd/m²
192
cd/m²
202
cd/m²
199
cd/m²
201
cd/m²
203
cd/m²
203
cd/m²
196
cd/m²
199
cd/m²
Information
Maximum: 203 cd/m²
Average: 198.6 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 95 %
Center on Battery: 201 cd/m²
Black: 1.4 cd/m²
Contrast: 144:1
Distribution of brightness

The display distributes brightness very consistently across the panel (95%), meaning there are very few abnormalities of the LED background illumination. Minimum and maximum are only 11 cd/m² apart. On the whole the brightness is thoroughly suitable with an average of 199 cd/m².

The display of the Fujitsu Lifebook A530 is suited for outdoor use. No matter how we expose the 15.6-inch device to the sun, there are no distracting reflections. Admittedly the insufficient brightness causes problems in the sun. The panel is then simply too dark to be able to pleasantly work. A shady area will often solve the problem.

From the side, direct sunlight
From the side, direct sunlight
Strong side angle, direct sunlight
Strong side angle, direct sunlight
From the side, indirect sunlight
From the side, indirect sunlight

When it comes to viewing angles, the A530 turns out to be limited. Viewing angles describe whether colours or writing can still be clearly recognised from a lateral view. We don't have much leeway on the 15.6-inch panel. If the eyes deviate up or down (vertical) the colours clearly fade even at the smallest deviation (around 10 degrees). To the right or left (horizontal) we can deviate up to 45 degrees from the middle. Only then do colours invert and the TFT becomes much darker.

Viewing angles Fujitsu LifeBook A5300MF101DE
Viewing angles Fujitsu LifeBook A5300MF101DE

Performance

Intel's 2010 mobile processors under the names Core i3, i5 and i7 aren't popular without reason and are rather high on the wish list. The CPUs can scale their performance thanks to Turbo-Boost technology (low energy consumption when idle) and they offer applications two additional virtual threads through hyper-threading. Admittedly, Turbo-Boost isn't found in the deployed Core i3-350M, as it's reserved to i5 and i7 CPUs.

The Core i3-350M (2 x 2.26 GHz) is the faster-clocked sibling of the i3-330M (2.13 GHz) used by many manufacturers. We are going to find out if that means a relevant performance advantage for customers.

The dual-core CPU has 3 MB L2 cache (Intel Smart Cache) and an integrated graphics unit. The Intel HD on the processor package takes care of video display alone and does it comparatively efficiently. There's no dedicated GPU on this system.

Two gigabytes of DDR3 SDRAM are available to the i3-350M. This amount sits on a single module and can be slightly increased by the free RAM slot. For Windows 7 systems (here Professional 64 Bit) 4 gigabytes are almost standard.

System info CPUZ CPU
System info CPUZ Cache
System info CPUZ Mainboard
System info CPUZ RAM
System info CPUZ RAM SPD
System info GPUZ
System info HDTune
DPC Latency Checker: idle - delays sporadically appear (driver not optimised)
DPC Latency Checker: WLAN on/off - delays appear after switching (driver not optimised)
 
System information Fujitsu LifeBook A5300MF101DE

The Core i3-350M (2.26 GHz) reaches 1.88 points in Cinebench R11.5 (64 Bit). Therefore the CPU is slower than the mid-range i5-520M and i5-430M. 520M laptops (2.4 GHz) reach around 2.2. points, whilst 430M CPUs (2.26 GHz) achieve 2.0 points. The 330M (2.13 GHz) gets 1.8 points in the CPU test, which is down to the small difference in clock speed.

In single-core computing the 2.26 GHz of the i3-350M is defeated by the i5-430M with the same clock speed due to the lack of Turbo Boost. The latter reaches up to 3.362 points (Cinebench R10 Single Core 64 Bit, Sony Vaio VPC-EB1S1E/BJ). The 350M in the A530 reaches 3.138 points. 330M laptops are slightly beaten with around 2.900 points.

The Core i3-350M is entry-level in terms of performance, even if not the worst. Users are thus armed for the multi-tasking applications of the coming years. Performance-oriented users that elaborately edit photos or often encode audio/video are better served with a Turbo-Boost-capable i5 processor.

The IGP graphics Intel Graphics Media Accelerator HD (Intel HD) reaches a low score of 1306 points (1.280x1.024) in 3DMark2006. That corresponds to a GeForce 9400M aka ION). For current games this is easily not enough. This of course wouldn't be the point of an energy-saving graphics solution. Its purpose is instead relieving the CPU in HD video decoding (MPEG2, H264, WMV9, VC1).

Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 32Bit
5891
Cinebench R10 Shading 32Bit
1621
Cinebench R10 Rendering Single CPUs 64Bit
3138 Points
Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 64Bit
7124 Points
Cinebench R10 Shading 64Bit
1775 Points
Cinebench R10 Rendering Single 32Bit
2491
Cinebench R11.5 OpenGL 64Bit
1.29 fps
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Multi 64Bit
1.88 Points
Help
PC Mark
PCMark 055234 points
PCMark Vantage4676 points
Help
4
Windows 7 Experience Index
Processor
Calculations per second
6.4
Memory (RAM)
Memory operations per second
5.5
Graphics
Desktop performance for Windows Aero
4
Gaming graphics
3D business and gaming graphics
4.9
Primary hard disk
Disk data transfer rate
5.7

We checked the system performance with PCMark Vantage. This test checks all components from the processor to RAM, graphics card to hard disk. The Fujitsu Lifebook A530 scores 4676 points. That's a good result for a laptop without dedicated graphics.

A dedicated GPU doesn't have a great impact on the overall score in PCMark Vantage. The Asus K72JK-TY001V with the same processor and Radeon HD 5145 reached 5296 points. Core i3-330M systems with a mid-range graphics card (Toshiba Qosmio F60, Nvidia GT 330M) have 4552 points. The technologically very similar competing model Lenovo G560 loses out with 4266 points.

So where do I stand if I can afford the A530 i3-350M? The Core 2 Duo rockets of the past paint a clear picture: the Lifebook A530 is to be found on a high level (PCMark Vantage) and is worth the small surcharge over Core 2 Duo. The A530 runs faster than a Sony Vaio VGN-FW51MF (4096 points) or an Acer Aspire 5935G (3882 points). Both are based on the 2009 premium CPU T9550 (2.66 GHz).

An entry-level processor performs better than a premium model from the middle of 2009? This is because of hyper-threading in the Core i3. In single-core computations a high-clocked Core 2 Duo will be better than the 350M, but PCMark Vantage doesn't attach great importance to this.

3D Mark
3DMark 052578 points
3DMark 06
 1280x1024
1319 points
Help
250 GB - 5400 rpm
Transfer Rate Minimum: 38.7 MB/s
Transfer Rate Maximum: 7.5 MB/s
Transfer Rate Average: 60 MB/s
Access Time: 19.5 ms
Burst Rate: 85.5 MB/s
CPU Usage: 1 %

The Western Digital hard disk (WD2500BEVT-16A23T0) with a gross capacity of 250 GB only shows below average transfer rates of 60 MB/s (sequential reading). Current, fast laptop hard disks, also running at 5400 RPM, reach 65 to 70 MB/s as a general rule. Only a very slight whooshing can be heard when the HDD is in use and the read/write heads make clacking noises only every now and then.

Emissions

Commendably functioning fan
Commendably functioning fan

System Noise/Temperature

Many office users wish for low heat waste and utter silence. However the A530 can't constantly provide silence, yet the temperatures always look good. We point out that no error occurred when inputting the results. The A530 is in fact warmer when idle than in the stress test!

The reason for this: when idle the fan is almost constantly off (29.8 dB(A)). Every now and then it gently speeds up for around 15 seconds (31.5 dB(A)), in order to remove the pent-up heat. Nevertheless so much heat builds up in the chassis when doing nothing that we measure 29 (above) and 32 degrees (below).

Max. Load
 34.5 °C34 °C28.3 °C 
 3.6 °C33.7 °C27.4 °C 
 27.5 °C28.3 °C25.2 °C 
 
26.4 °C33.3 °C29.7 °C
27.2 °C32.6 °C34.6 °C
26.5 °C25.3 °C27 °C
Maximum: 34.5 °C
Average: 26.9 °C
 Maximum: 34.6 °C
Average: 29.2 °C
Power Supply (max.)  42.4 °C | Room Temperature 22.2 °C

Then we let the processor put pedal to the metal on all four threads with the stress test Prime95. The fan turned constantly, yet in spite of this it didn't reach any louder than 31.5 dB(A)! For this reason the built-up heat in the chassis is so thoroughly removed that the temperature average goes down not only below but also above.

The maximum system noise of 40.1 dB(A) was only reached when we switched on 3DMark2006 (GPU) alongside the foregoing Prime95 (CPU). This then loaded the 35 Watt TDP of the i3-350M completely. Our test shows that the cooling system has room to breathe. This means an A530 variant with i5-450M (from 620 Euro) should behave as ergonomically as our test device.

Noise Level

Idle 29.8 / 30.4 / 31.5 dB(A)
HDD 30.9 dB(A)
DVD 35.4 / dB(A)
Load 31.5 / 40.1 dB(A)
 
    30 dB
silent
40 dB
audible
50 dB
loud
 
min: , med: , max:     (15 cm distance)

Loudspeakers

The stereo loudspeakers above the keyboard will only convince the unassuming office friend. The sound is indeed clear and undistorted at maximum volume but it's strongly dominated by highs. Low notes really can't be produced by the diaphragms. When playing music the pitch is so high that it is little short of damaging ears. The sound enhancements (bass boost, virtual surround) don't make any difference at all, regardless of whether we play pop, rock or electronic music. The volume is adequate for a 15.6-inch device.

If you connect external speakers, you can use the 3.5 mm headphone jack on the front. The hearing test produced no static.

Battery Life

Cheap laptops are often rumoured to have a low battery life. The A530 escapes from this assumption, even if it doesn't become part of the battery-life elite. When surfing via WLAN we reached 2:58 hours (178 minutes). Considering the weak capacity of the battery at 4400 mAh (48 Wh) this battery life seems really good. The Lenovo G560 with i3-350M, the keenest competitor in terms of price, reaches half an hour less with a similarly weak battery.

The DVD test turns out the same as the WLAN test. After 2:51 hours the film that we watched at a low brightness of 100 cd/m² turned off. 2:45 hours pass until the film can be continued. That's how long the battery needs for a complete charge.

The maximum battery life of the A530 (idle) is 331 minutes. Reaching this is, however, unrealistic. The WLAN was deactivated, the brightness was on the lowest level and the processor had no load.

Charging 175 min.
Charging 175 min.
WLAN surfing 178 min.
WLAN surfing 178 min.
DVD film 171 min.
DVD film 171 min.
Idle 331 min.
Idle 331 min.
Battery runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
5h 31min
WiFi Surfing
2h 58min
DVD
2h 30min
Load (maximum brightness)
1h 23min

The good battery life despite the weak battery is telling of low energy consumption. Our multimeter also proves this and leaves the energy savers rejoicing. When there's nothing to do (CPU idle) and all saving options are on (brightness on the lowest level, wireless off), then the idle energy consumption is 10.9 Watt. Realistically for office work with a busy processor an average of around 20 Watt is more likely (balanced profile).

However, with a Core i3 there are even more efficient laptops. The often cited comparison model Lenovo G560 only needs 9.5 Watt when idle. The Lenovo Thinkpad L412 0530-5ZG (i3-330M, IGP) needs 8.7 Watt. The 13.3-inch Acer Aspire 3820TG-334G50N (i3-330M, HD 5470) only needs 8.2 Watt (max. idle) despite the graphics card.

We obtained the maximum energy consumption in the stress test with Prime95 and a 3D benchmark. Furmark doesn't run with the IGP graphics. The battery wasn't charged during the test. The multimeter displayed 52.1 Watt. The 80 Watt power supply (336g) is therefore suitably dimensioned. Energy savers should be careful of the relatively high power consumption when in standby. It's 1.0 Watt.

Power consumption

Off / Standby 0.4 / 1 Watt
Idle 10.9 / 14.8 / 17.6 Watt
Load 33.7 / 52.1 Watt
 
Key: min: , med: , max:         

As Fujitsu business office laptops in the past few months haven't really been convincing and never stormed into the office top 10, the manufacturer produces a praiseworthy device in the consumer segment. If you want a matte display and an Intel Core i3 for just over 500 Euro, you're well equipped for the coming office years with the A530 (A5300MF101DE).

The workmanship is in parts very good (stability of the base unit), even if it's plain and subtle. The keyboard with its generous layout and soft stroke is acceptable for those that type often. Admittedly the tiny touchpad is disappointing with its rickety keys.

The connection possibilities are also high quality. Users don't have to do without HDMI, Bluetooth, WLAN DraftN and ExpressCard54 (upgrade cards). There's lots of enthusiasm to be have regarding the ergonomics. The heat waste is very low with or without load. The noise of the cooling system is from time to time not present (fan off) and even with CPU load extremely low (31.5 dB(A)).

The battery life doesn't belong to the few disadvantages of the laptop. It's not particularly high at three hours (WLAN surfing) but due to the weak battery it's actually really good.

Also the pricing turns out attractively for the A530. You can purchase it starting under 500 Euro, yet admittedly without any operating system. Including Win 7 Pro a surcharge of not more than 30 Euro is payable. That's still a good offer, even with just a 12 month bring-in guarantee.

Fujitsu LifeBook A5300MF101DE: Stable office power with matte display
Fujitsu LifeBook A5300MF101DE: Stable office power with matte display
In Review: Fujitsu LifeBook A5300MF101DE
In Review: Fujitsu LifeBook A5300MF101DE

Specifications

Fujitsu LifeBook A5300MF101DE

:: Processor
:: Mainboard
Intel HM55
:: Memory
2048 MB, PC3-8500
:: Graphics adapter
:: Display
15.6 inch 16:9, 1366x768 pixel, LP156WH2-TLBA, glossy: no
:: Harddisk
250 GB - 5400 rpm, 250 GB 5400 rpm Western Digital
:: Soundcard
Realtek ALC269 @ Intel 82801IB ICH9 - High Definition Audio Controller
:: Connections
1 Express Card 54mm, 3 USB 2.0, 1 VGA, 1 HDMI, 2 Kensington Lock, Audio Connections: Line out, microphone, Card Reader: SD/MS/MS Pro/MMC,
:: Networking
Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller (10/100/1000MBit), Atheros AR9285 Wireless Network Adapter (b g n ), 2.1+EDR Bluetooth
:: Optical drive
TSSTcorp CDDVDW TS-L633B
:: Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 38.4 x 378 x 252
:: Weight
2.407 kg Power Supply: 0.336 kg
:: Battery
48 Wh Lithium-Ion, 4400mAh
:: Price
599 Euro
:: Operating System
Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 64 Bit
:: Additional features
Webcam: 1.3 MP, Nero Essentials S, 24 Months Warranty

 

Card reader and audio inputs and outputs are found on the front.
Card reader and audio inputs and outputs are found on the front.
On the underside there's the maintenance hatch.
On the underside there's the maintenance hatch.
The 250 GB hard disk from Western Digital works very quietly.
The 250 GB hard disk from Western Digital works very quietly.
The mainboard including the processor and the two RAM slots
The mainboard including the processor and the two RAM slots
Fujitsu was stingy with the RAM and only includes 2048 MB DDR3.
Fujitsu was stingy with the RAM and only includes 2048 MB DDR3.
On show, the heat pipe of the Core i3-350M.
On show, the heat pipe of the Core i3-350M.
The WLAN module sits in a Mini PCI Express slot.
The WLAN module sits in a Mini PCI Express slot.
The power supply weighs 336 g.
The power supply weighs 336 g.
It supplies up to 80 Watt, which is more than enough for the maximum consumption of 52 Watt.
It supplies up to 80 Watt, which is more than enough for the maximum consumption of 52 Watt.
The battery keeps the 15.6-incher on your lap for more than three hours when surfing via WLAN.
The battery keeps the 15.6-incher on your lap for more than three hours when surfing via WLAN.
Rarity: not only the preinstalled Windows 7 Professional is included in the media, but also XP Professional SP3 as well as appropriate drivers.
Rarity: not only the preinstalled Windows 7 Professional is included in the media, but also XP Professional SP3 as well as appropriate drivers.
Fujitsu Laptops aren't exactly considered to be sexy. Our test device confirms this:
Fujitsu Laptops aren't exactly considered to be sexy. Our test device confirms this:
The A530 is a mundane, matte office laptop.
The A530 is a mundane, matte office laptop.
No dedicated graphics, no multimedia sound system
No dedicated graphics, no multimedia sound system
and not even a svelte, stylish look.
and not even a svelte, stylish look.
Nevertheless it's interesting for many office users:
Nevertheless it's interesting for many office users:
There's the Core i3-350M system from 520 Euro.
There's the Core i3-350M system from 520 Euro.
Each of the 12 A530 configurations has a matte display.
Each of the 12 A530 configurations has a matte display.
The visuals are rather mundane,
The visuals are rather mundane,
yet in detail and on the whole it's a solid device.
yet in detail and on the whole it's a solid device.
The light effects are kept within limits (LED status).
The light effects are kept within limits (LED status).
The chassis and the lid are very torsionally rigid.
The chassis and the lid are very torsionally rigid.
The taut hinges should solidly last the daily routine.
The taut hinges should solidly last the daily routine.
As far as connections are concerned, the office user even gets HDMI and ExpressCard54.
As far as connections are concerned, the office user even gets HDMI and ExpressCard54.

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Pro

+Quiet and cool
+Anti-glare display
+Low energy consumption
+Good performance
+ExpressCard upgrade slot
 

Contra

-Too few connections
-Tiny touchpad
-Spongy keys
-Low-contrast display
-High-pitched sound

In ShortCut

What we liked

A simple office device without bells and whistles. No noisy fan and no electric heating pad.  A matte display to top it off: that's how an office laptop should be.

What we missed

A larger touchpad that can be used pleasantly.

What we missed

Core i3 with good comprehensive equipment for the purchasing price (Bluetooth, ExpressCard, Windows 7 Pro + Win XP Pro).

The competition

Acers Extensa 5230E: in countless configurations; Lenovo G560: i3 without windows starting at 430 Euro. Samsung P530 Pro Pitts: very quiet; Asus K51AE-SX049L: AMD alternative; Asus UL50VG-XX002C: clearly more mobile and more refined; Asus X52J: 350M alternative from 549 Euro; Acer Aspire 5740-333G25Mi: for 580 Euro with Radeon HD 5470 and 330M

Rating

Fujitsu LifeBook A5300MF101DE
12/05/2010 v2
Sebastian Jentsch

Chassis
86%
Keyboard
76%
Pointing Device
60%
Connectivity
65%
Weight
82%
Battery
79%
Display
75%
Games Performance
54%
Application Performance
85%
Temperature
92%
Noise
92%
Add Points
88%
Average
78%
80%
Office *
Weighted Average

> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Archive of our own reviews > Review Fujitsu LifeBook A530 Notebook
Author: Sebastian Jentsch, 2010-08-28 (Update: 2013-06- 6)