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Lenovo Yoga C940-15 display is brighter than every HP Spectre laptop thus far

Lenovo Yoga C940-15 display is brighter than every HP Spectre laptop thus far
Lenovo Yoga C940-15 display is brighter than every HP Spectre laptop thus far
The HP Spectre series consists of ultra-thin flagship laptops and convertibles to represent the best that the manufacturer has to offer for consumers. Nonetheless, all models thus far have been lacking in one particular area.

With the exception of some high-end flagship laptops like the Dell XPS 15, Apple MacBook Pro, or Huawei MateBook X Pro, most laptop displays tend to top out at around 300 nits. The glossy touchscreens on convertible laptops, however, ought to be brighter since users would be more likely to use the system outdoors where there is stronger ambient lighting to overcome. Lenovo has apparently recognized this need as its high-end Yoga C940 series is advertised with an above-average backlight brightness of 500 nits.

The direct competitor to the 15.6-inch Yoga C940 convertible is the HP Spectre x360 15 and so a Spectre model is also expected to have a brighter-than-average display. Unfortunately, this not the case as every Spectre laptop we've tested thus far has a display brightness of only 300 to 350 nits. One model in particular, the atypical Spectre Folio, comes close to 400 nits. If you intend to use your 15.6-inch convertible laptop outdoors often, then the Lenovo convertible will be the objectively brighter option compared to the HP equivalent.

To HP's credit, the company offers laptops with 1000-nit display options to be over two times brighter than most other systems. The problem is that only certain flagship business laptops from HP can be configured with the super-bright display while the consumer-centric Spectre series continues to be stuck on "regular" 300-nit panels. The Spectre x360 15 OLED configuration may be brighter, but we've yet to test this particular SKU ourselves.

Lenovo Yoga C940-15IRH
LG Philips LP156WFC-SPU1, IPS, 15.6, 1920x1080
HP Spectre x360 13-ap0312ng
M133NVF3, IPS, 13.3, 1920x1080
HP Spectre x360 15-df0126ng
AU Optronics AUO30EB, IPS, 15.6, 3840x2160
HP Spectre x360 15-ch000
BOE0730, IPS, 15.6, 3840x2160
HP Spectre x360 15-ch011nr
BOE0730, IPS, 15.6, 3840x2160
HP Spectre x360 13t-ae000
LGD0588, IPS, 13.3, 3840x2160
HP Spectre x360 13-ae048ng
Chi Mei (CMN1376), IPS, 13.3, 1920x1080
HP Spectre Folio 13t-ak000
AU Optronics AUO572D, IPS, 13.3, 1920x1080
Response Times
Response Time Grey 50% / Grey 80% *
48.4 (24.4, 24)
29.2 (14, 15.2)
57 (26, 31)
36 (18, 18)
38 (20.4, 17.6)
51.6 (25.6, 26)
36 (18, 18)
52 (24.4, 27.6)
Response Time Black / White *
36.4 (21.2, 15.2)
20 (10.8, 9.2)
31 (16, 15)
23.6 (12, 11.6)
27.6 (15.6, 12)
32.4 (16.4, 16)
27 (13, 14)
37.2 (21.2, 16)
PWM Frequency
1000 (99)
943.4 (99)
943.4 (99)
25000 (40)
Screen
Brightness middle
484.8
272
330
349.5
329.3
329.8
311
389.8
Brightness
463
298
310
331
316
318
278
396
Brightness Distribution
82
84
87
90
84
74
82
88
Black Level *
0.26
0.39
0.37
0.29
0.31
0.25
0.2
0.27
Contrast
1865
697
892
1205
1062
1319
1555
1444
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 *
4.5
4.3
4.03
4.06
4.78
2.37
3.98
2.72
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 max. *
7.55
9
6.74
7.68
11.75
4.08
8.48
5.49
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 calibrated *
1.19
2.4
1.96
4.22
3.51
1.25
Greyscale DeltaE2000 *
5.7
4.4
4.49
4.4
7.9
2.8
5.57
4.2
Gamma
2.45 90%
1.97 112%
2.57 86%
2.11 104%
2.24 98%
2.145 103%
2.51 88%
2.1 105%
CCT
6101 107%
5825 112%
6744 96%
7422 88%
8323 78%
6441 101%
7810 83%
7470 87%
Color Space (Percent of AdobeRGB 1998)
58.7
58.9
61
56.5
58.8
67
64
62.2
Color Space (Percent of sRGB)
92.8
89.8
94
86.9
90.4
98
99
98.2
Total Average (Program / Settings)

* ... smaller is better

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 12 > Lenovo Yoga C940-15 display is brighter than every HP Spectre laptop thus far
Allen Ngo, 2019-12-19 (Update: 2019-12-19)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.