Notebookcheck

HP Omen Spacer Wireless TKL keyboard and Omen Vector Wireless mouse seem to be enticing options for lag-free wireless gaming

HP Omen Spacer Wireless TLK Keyboard. (Image Source: HP)
HP Omen Spacer Wireless TLK Keyboard. (Image Source: HP)
HP is introducing new peripherals to its gaming lineup. The Omen Spacer Wireless is a tenkeyless keyboard with Cherry MX Brown switches that offers great battery life, loads of key customization options, NKRO, and 100% anti-ghosting. The Vector Wireless is a 16,000 DPI mouse that HP says is the world's fastest USB-C charging gaming mouse with up to 180 hours of battery life.

HP is announcing a few new additions to its gaming accessory lineup. We've seen the Omen Blast and Omen Frequency Wireless before and now it is time to take a look at the Omen Space Wireless tenkeyless (TKL) keyboard and the Omen Vector Wireless mouse.

HP Omen Spacer Wireless TKL Keyboard

The Omen Spacer is a wireless TKL keyboard that utilizes Warp Wireless Technology over the 2.4 GHz frequency band. HP says that this wireless connection is as fast as a traditional wire though it still bundles a cable with the keyboard for flexibility. The Omen Spacer uses Cherry MX Brown switches with a 1 ms response time and a rated lifetime of up to 100 million keystrokes.

The keys offer 100% anti-ghosting with N-key rollover. They also can be fully configured to offer custom lighting and macro functionality via HP's Omen Command Center software. According to HP, the Omen Spacer Wireless can offer up to six hours of play time with just five minutes of charging via USB-C and up to 75 hours on a full charge. A detachable USB cable and a magnetic palm rest come included in the box.

HP Vector Wireless Mouse

The Vector Wireless mouse uses the same Warp Wireless Technology as the Omen Spacer keyboard and offers 1 ms polling rates with extremely low input lag. The Vector Wireless uses a PixArt PAW3335 sensor that allows for customizing the DPI between 100 to 16,000 with a tracking speed of 400 inches per second and an acceleration of 40G. HP says that the Vector Wireless tracks with a 99% accuracy.

The Vector Wireless is designed primarily for right hand use and can be gripped in both palm and claw styles. There are a total of six programmable buttons and they can be customized in the Omen Command Center, which can also be used to control the lighting.

The Vector Wireless uses Omron mechanical switches for the left and right buttons and these are rated for 50 million clicks each. The Vector Wireless can be used both in wired and wireless modes. HP says that just 30 seconds of charging via USB-C can offer up to an hour of battery life while a full charge can yield up to 180 hours.

The HP Omen Spacer Wireless TKL keyboard is available for pre-order via hp.com for US$159.99 while the HP Vector Wireless mouse can be purchased now for US$99.99.

HP Omen Spacer Wireless TLK Keyboard - 1. (Image Source: HP)
HP Omen Spacer Wireless TLK Keyboard - 1. (Image Source: HP)
HP Omen Spacer Wireless TLK Keyboard - 2. (Image Source: HP)
HP Omen Spacer Wireless TLK Keyboard - 2. (Image Source: HP)
HP Vector Wireless mouse - 1. (Image Source: HP)
HP Vector Wireless mouse - 1. (Image Source: HP)
HP Vector Wireless mouse - 2. (Image Source: HP)
HP Vector Wireless mouse - 2. (Image Source: HP)

Source(s)

HP Press Release

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 09 > HP Omen Spacer Wireless TKL keyboard and Omen Vector Wireless mouse seem to be enticing options for lag-free wireless gaming
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2020-09-16 (Update: 2020-09-16)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.