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HP Omen Blast and Omen Frequency Wireless gaming headsets promise immersive 7.1-channel audio and long hours of comfort listening

HP Omen Blast gaming headset. (Image Source: HP)
HP Omen Blast gaming headset. (Image Source: HP)
HP has announced new additions to its gaming accessory lineup. The Omen Blast and Omen Frequency Wireless are designed to offer maximal comfort during extended gaming sessions while offering clear 7.1-channel surround. The Omen Blast comes with a 24-bit DAC while the Omen Frequency Wireless aims to offer low-latency high-fidelity audio thanks to Warp Wireless tech.

HP has announced two new headsets to its gaming accessory portfolio — the Omen Blast and Omen Frequency Wireless. Both headsets aim to offer an immersive 7.1-channel surround audio and compatibility with PC and consoles.

HP Omen Blast

The Omen Blast is a wired gaming headset that comes with its own 24-bit USB DAC that is compatible with Windows and macOS. It features 53 mm drivers and offers 360-degree 7.1-channel spatial awareness. Users can customize the sound profile in the Omen Command Center. The Omen Blast is compatible with PC, PS4, Xbox, Nintendo Switch, and can even be used with smartphones with 3.5 mm headphone jacks.

The Omen Blast features a retractable passive noise-cancelling microphone and volume controls directly on the 1.2 m-long cable. HP says that the Omen Blast uses "super-duper-soft" padding and a suspension headband that should allow for comfortable wear during extended gaming sessions.

HP Omen Frequency Wireless

The Omen Frequency Wireless is HP's 7.1-channel headset offering low-latency audio with a long battery life and is powered by the C-Media Xear chip. The Omen Frequency Wireless uses Warp Wireless Technology to minimize lag while ensuring high fidelity. HP says that the headset can offer up to 30 hours of battery life on a single charge via USB-C. The Omen Frequency offers touch controls for volume, lights, and power.

Like the Omen Blast, the Omen Frequency also features the ability to set custom audio profiles via the Omen Command Center along with an environment noise-cancelling microphone that can be easily tucked away when not in use.

HP notes that full wireless functionality is made possible via the Omen Command Center and thus works with Windows 10 and higher. Some wireless features are limited on the PS4, macOS, iOS, and Chrome OS. Those with a Nintendo Switch or Xbox One will have to make do via the 3.5 mm jack.

The HP Omen Blast gaming headset is now available via HP.com for US$79.99 while the Omen Frequency Wireless is expected to be available from December for a starting price of US$169.99.

HP Omen Blast headset - 1. (Image Source: HP)
HP Omen Blast headset - 1. (Image Source: HP)
HP Omen Blast headset - 2. (Image Source: HP)
HP Omen Blast headset - 2. (Image Source: HP)
HP Omen Frequency Wireless headset - 1. (Image Source: HP)
HP Omen Frequency Wireless headset - 1. (Image Source: HP)
HP Omen Frequency Wireless headset - 2. (Image Source: HP)
HP Omen Frequency Wireless headset - 2. (Image Source: HP)

Source(s)

HP Press Release

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 09 > HP Omen Blast and Omen Frequency Wireless gaming headsets promise immersive 7.1-channel audio and long hours of comfort listening
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2020-09-16 (Update: 2020-09-16)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.