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MWC 2016 | Archos unveils Oxygen 101b, Oxygen 80, and Oxygen 70 Android tablets

Archos unveils Oxygen 101b, Oxygen 80, and Oxygen 70 tablets
Archos unveils Oxygen 101b, Oxygen 80, and Oxygen 70 tablets
The series includes 1920 x 1200 resolution screens and will be launching this May for a starting price of just 100 Euros.

MWC 2016 is right around the corner and manufacturers are already unveiling new products. Archos has announced three new tablets of different screen sizes based on Android 6.0 Marshmallow starting with the 7-inch Oxygen 70, 8-inch Oxygen 80, and 10.1-inch Oxygen 101b. All models are expected to ship with FHD 16:10 (1920 x 1200) panels sometime this Summer.

The new tablets from the French manufacturer will be priced aggressively at just 100, 150, and 180 Euros for the Oxygen 70, Oxygen 80, and Oxygen 101b, respectively. Perhaps notably, the tablets will each have a metal chassis with very similar hardware specifications between them including the quad-core 1.3 GHz MediaTek MT8163 SoC, integrated ARM Mali-T720 MP2 GPU, 2 GB RAM, 16 GB eMMC, rear 5 MP camera with auto-focus and LED Flash, and front-facing 2 MP camera. Battery capacities will vary between the models as shown in the spec sheet below.

In addition to the three tablets, Archos also unveiled the Oxygen 50d smartphone for MWC 2016. Major manufacturers like Samsung, HP, LG, and Huawei are expected to make major announcements next week regarding their respective 2016 lineup. The heavily rumored Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge will likely be center stage on mainstream media sources.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 02 > Archos unveils Oxygen 101b, Oxygen 80, and Oxygen 70 Android tablets
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-02-17 (Update: 2016-02-17)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.