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Archos 50 Power smartphone to come with 4000 mAh battery pack

Archos 50 Power smartphone to come with 4000 mAh battery pack
Archos 50 Power smartphone to come with 4000 mAh battery pack
The 5-inch budget smartphone will make use of a dense battery pack and retail for 150 Euros.

Archos is extending its range of affordable LTE smartphone with the Archos 50 Power. Specifications include:

  • 5-inch 720p display
  • Quad-core 1 GHz MediaTek MT6735P SoC (ARM Cortex-A53)
  • 2 GB RAM
  • 16 GB eMMC w/ MicroSD support up to 32 GB
  • 13 MP rear w/ Flash and auto-focus + 2 MP front cameras
  • Dual SIM support
  • 4000 mAh battery
  • 145 x 72.2 x 9.2 mm
  • 148 g
  • Android 5.1 Lollipop

The device is notable for its large battery pack for a smartphone. Typically, smartphones in this size class have 3000 mAh battery packs or smaller, so a very long battery life is expected out of the Archos. The 1 GHz MediaTek MT6735P SoC, however, is found in very budget smartphones and is much weaker than the standard 1.3 GHz MT6735. Thus, the "Power" in the Archos 50 Power is clearly referencing the battery and not hardware performance.

The Archos smartphone will retail for around 150 Euros and include USB power adapters and cables with in-ear earphones. The full specifications list can be found in the photo gallery below.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 05 > Archos 50 Power smartphone to come with 4000 mAh battery pack
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-05-11 (Update: 2016-05-11)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.