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Sony could be phasing out the Xperia C and M series

Sony could be phasing out the Xperia C and M series
Sony could be phasing out the Xperia C and M series
The manufacturer will unify its Xperia brand and do away with letter subcategories by 2018 according to leaked screenshots.

Leaked presentation slides that presumably detail future plans on the Xperia smartphone series reveal that Sony may be cutting off the budget and mainstream Xperia C and M series completely. The Japanese manufacturer recently ended its Z series with the introduction of the X series earlier this year and announced late last year that it would be streamlining its smartphone models to focus on more profitable flagship models. The slide supports these previous reports and makes it quite clear that Sony will have a new marketing campaign for the Xperia X series come 2018 with a renewed focus on the Internet of Things (IoT) and the Cloud.

The next smartphone from Sony is already dropping the C name as it was previously know as the Xperia C6 Ultra, but will now be called the Xperia X Ultra according to XperiaBlog. Expect most if not all Sony smartphones to carry the Xperia X name in future marketing material. Exactly how well Sony will do by grouping mainstream and high-end phones under one name remains to be seen. The manufacturer is not even on the top 5 list of the world's largest smartphone manufacturers.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 05 > Sony could be phasing out the Xperia C and M series
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-05-18 (Update: 2016-05-18)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.