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Microsoft Surface Book successor may be postponed until 2017

Microsoft Surface Book successor may be postponed until 2017
Microsoft Surface Book successor may be postponed until 2017
The Surface Book 2 could quietly skip 2016 according to the latest rumors from DigiTimes.

The Microsoft Surface Book is a respectable detachable in its own right, but its launch last year was at a time of declining notebook sales where Microsoft's unique take on a notebook failed to catch as much attention as the lauded Surface Pro 4. An update to the Surface Book was rumored to launch next month with new features including Thunderbolt 3, but the latest leaks= from DigiTimes is reporting even more bad news for the detachable.

According to the source, Microsoft suppliers have received the unexpected message to postpone production on the Surface Book 2 until 2017 due to design issues found late in the process.

The existing Surface Book has likely not been selling very well due to the lack of distribution channels according to Business Insider. While the detachable carries some impressive hardware, it also launched with a few notable issues due in part to its unique base and handling of a discrete GPU. Meanwhile, sales of Surface tablets have tripled from 2014 to 2015 to 1.5 million units during the first half of last year. 

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 05 > Microsoft Surface Book successor may be postponed until 2017
Florian Wimmer/ Allen Ngo, 2016-05-18 (Update: 2016-05-18)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.