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Surface Pro 4 Type Cover with fingerprint sensor coming March 15

Surface Pro 4 Type Cover with fingerprint sensor coming March 15
Surface Pro 4 Type Cover with fingerprint sensor coming March 15
The new Type Cover will cost $180 and be compatible with both the Surface Pro 4 and Surface Pro 3.

The current Type Cover for the Surface Pro 4 measures 295 x 216 x 4.65 mm in dimensions weighs 292 grams, and is backwards compatible with the Surface Pro 3. The upcoming Type Cover will integrate a fingerprint sensor and will be coming to parts of Europe in just a few weeks.

According to Microsoft, users can pre-order the new Type Cover today for 180 Euros through select retail outlets. Only the Onyx (Black) color option will be available at launch. Limited warranty is the standard 12-month coverage.

The new fingerprint scanner means that the Surface Pro 4 and Surface Pro 3 can now use biometric registration via Windows Hello on Windows 10. The Surface Pro 4 in particular can also use facial recognition with the front-facing camera.

Though the Surface Pro 4 is arguably the best Windows tablet available, its lack of USB Type-C, WWAN, Express Card reader, hardware accessibility, and fingerprint reader at launch stand out as thorns on an otherwise excellent device. The late addition of a fingerprint reader will appease some users while it is unlikely that Microsoft will address the other aforementioned omissions before the next inevitable Surface Pro refresh.

See our reviews on the three Surface Pro 4 SKUs here.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 03 > Surface Pro 4 Type Cover with fingerprint sensor coming March 15
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-03- 2 (Update: 2016-03- 2)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.