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AMD Ryzen 9 3950X ES confirmed as Geekbench-wrecking record-breaker

The AMD Ryzen 9 3950X reached a clock rate of 4,300 MHz. (Image source: PCGamesN)
The AMD Ryzen 9 3950X reached a clock rate of 4,300 MHz. (Image source: PCGamesN)
It has been confirmed that it was one of AMD’s new Matisse desktop processors that smashed its way through Geekbench’s multi-core test recently; more precisely it was a Ryzen 9 3950X engineering sample (ES). Apparently, the system featured an overclocked CPU utilizing an AIO water cooler and an X470 reference motherboard.

We reported on some incredible results on Geekbench lately that had been amassed by a system known only as “AMD Myrtle” on the benchmark database. The single-core result was a huge 5,868 points, but that soon paled into comparison against the massive multi-core test score of 61,072 points. Geekbench entries can be tampered with, but thanks to an HWBOT submission, this particular record appears to be genuine.

According to the system user, blueleader, the CPU in question was the AMD Ryzen 9 3950X (ES). The single-core score puts the processor into the realm of chips like the Intel Core i5-9600K and the i7-8700K. But the multi-core score places the Matisse CPU way beyond anything listed on Geekbench’s latest charts.

But it appears not everyone submits their results to Geekbench’s charts, as the current world record score is 84,070 points by a system featuring a Xeon W-3175X – but that Intel beast comes with the advantage of having 28 cores. The Ryzen 9 3950X’s 16 cores still perform magnificently, and the multi-core score of 61,072 puts it in 12th place in HWBOT’s Hall of Fame.

System details. (Image source: HWBOT)
System details. (Image source: HWBOT)

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 06 > AMD Ryzen 9 3950X ES confirmed as Geekbench-wrecking record-breaker
Daniel R Deakin, 2019-06-19 (Update: 2019-06-19)