Notebookcheck

Razer redesigns logo to promote social distancing and it's actually pretty nice

Razer redesigns logo to promote social distancing and it's actually pretty nice (Source: Razer)
Razer redesigns logo to promote social distancing and it's actually pretty nice (Source: Razer)
Though only temporary in response to current events, it's a refreshing take on the traditional Razer logo nonetheless while keeping the recognizable symmetry and three snakes.
Allen Ngo, 🇷🇺

With entire countries and counties under shelter-in-place or quarantine rules, public anxiety has been high as exemplified by the plunging stock market and pictures of empty store shelves all over social media. Some companies are making the most of the situation by encouraging employees to work from home, but Razer's latest response is perhaps one of the more clever ones.

Inspired by the idea of social distancing to fight COVID-19, Razer unveiled a new logo today on its official Facebook page. The three interlocking snakes on the traditional logo that we're all familiar with are now individual snakes avoiding contact with one another. It's a simple take that hits the mark in terms of messaging and even marketing during these times of economic uncertainty. Razer has been encouraging users on social media to game from home all month long as well.

This isn't the first time where Razer edited its own logo. The company has frequently changed its logo in honor of special events such as Valentine's Day where the logo was pink, gay pride week where the logo was rainbow, and the launch of the Mercury White Blade laptops where the logo was white.

Read all 6 comments / answer
static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 03 > Razer redesigns logo to promote social distancing and it's actually pretty nice
Allen Ngo, 2020-03-22 (Update: 2020-03-22)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.