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Intel buys Rivet Networks, the maker of Killer Wi-Fi

The AX1650 is one of Killer's latest products. (Source: Intel)
The AX1650 is one of Killer's latest products. (Source: Intel)
Intel has announced that it has acquired Rivet Networks, a company best known for its Killer brand of connectivity modules. The silicon giant asserts that this move will enhance its standing as a proponent of Wi-Fi standardization. It may also simply help the company stay ahead of the competition in terms of this area of specs.

Killer is a name typically associated with the Wi-Fi cards found in high-performance PCs: for example, its new AX1650i module is found in the Alienware Area-51m R2, which gives this premium gaming notebook data-transfer rates of up to 2.4 gigabits per second (Gb/s). Now, this brand, as well as all others from its company Rivet Networks, has become part of Intel.

The 2 organizations have been working closely on new connectivity solutions for some time, which has culminated in Team Blue's absorption of the networking specialist for an undisclosed sum. The latter will reportedly become fully integrated into the former; for example, its chief executive officer Mike Cubbage will walk into Intel as its new Senior Director of Connectivity Innovations.

The chip-maker has stated that it intends to leverage its new acquisition to inform and enhance areas of its business such as Project Athena and Wi-Fi 6 tech development. Then again, it also intends to retain the practically household name of Killer in order to augment its own existing wireless solutions (those intended for gaming PCs included).

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 05 > Intel buys Rivet Networks, the maker of Killer Wi-Fi
Deirdre O'Donnell, 2020-05-23 (Update: 2020-05-23)
Deirdre O'Donnell
I became a professional writer and editor shortly after graduation. My degrees are in biomedical sciences; however, they led to some experience in the biotech area, which convinced me of its potential to revolutionize our health, environment and lives in general. This developed into an all-consuming interest in more aspects of tech over time: I can never write enough on the latest electronics, gadgets and innovations. My other interests include imaging, astronomy, and streaming all the things. Oh, and coffee.