Notebookcheck

Dell Latitude 5289 (i5, 256GB, 8GB) Convertible Review

Benjamin Herzig (translated by Katherine Bodner), 05/19/2017

Flexibility and stamina. Convertible notebooks with 360° hinges have become more and more popular in the past years and even businesses have started using them. Naturally, Dell would like a piece of the pie and has consequently launched the Latitude 5289. Read our detailed review to find out why it will have a hard time asserting itself despite its convincing performance.

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PC convertibles have quite a long history. This sector used to be dominated by convertibles with swivel hinges, including Dell's Latitude convertibles. The last device of this series that we tested was the Latitude XT3, which was based on a 2011 Sandy Bridge processor.

A lot has changed since then, and convertibles with swivel hinges have all but disappeared from the market. Instead, convertibles with 360° hinges have established themselves, with the pioneer in the business sector being Lenovo with its ThinkPad Yoga. Dell has now caught up and can offer its own equivalent for the business sector - today's test unit, the Latitude 5289. This device is in direct competition with Lenovo's ThinkPad Yoga 370 and HP's EliteBook x360.

The entry-level US version is available for $1284 in the Dell online store. Our mid-range test unit with Core i5, 256 GB SSD and 8 GB of RAM can currently be purchased for about $1328 on the Dell online shop.

Dell Latitude 5289 (Latitude 5000 Series)
Graphics adapter
Memory
8192 MB 
, LPDDR3-1866
Display
12.5 inch 16:9, 1920x1080 pixel 176 PPI, 10-point, native pen support, BOE NV12N51, IPS LED, Gorilla Glass 4, glossy: yes
Mainboard
Intel Kaby Lake-U Premium PCH
Storage
SanDisk X400 256GB, SATA (SD8SB8U-256G), 256 GB 
Soundcard
Intel Kaby Lake-U/Y PCH - High Definition Audio
Connections
4 USB 3.0 / 3.1 Gen1, 1 HDMI, 2 DisplayPort, 1 Kensington Lock, Audio Connections: 3.5 mm audio combo, Card Reader: MicroSD, 1 SmartCard
Networking
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265 (a/b/g/n/ac), Bluetooth 4.2
Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 18.45 x 304.8 x 210 ( = 0.73 x 12 x 8.27 in)
Battery
60 Wh Lithium-Polymer
Operating System
Microsoft Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit
Camera
Webcam: 720p Fixed Focus
Additional features
Speakers: 2W stereo, Keyboard: 6-row chiclet keyboard, Keyboard Light: yes, Dell Command Power Manager, Dell Command Update, Dell System Detect, Dell TouchPad, Del SupportAssistAgent, Microsoft Office 2016 Trial, 36 Months Warranty
Weight
1.34 kg ( = 47.27 oz / 2.95 pounds), Power Supply: 250 g ( = 8.82 oz / 0.55 pounds)
Price
1328 Euro

 

Case

Dell Latitude 5289
Dell Latitude 5289
The device came with a stripped screp ex works.
The device came with a stripped screp ex works.

One of the most important steps in developing a business notebook is creating a case that is stable, durable and practical. It seems that Dell wanted to add an additional element to the mix: inconspicuousness. This is not necessarily bad - simple design can be very beautiful. On the outside, the Latitude 5289 looks like the other models of the Latitude 5000 series. The case is angular with slightly rounded edges and the case becomes minimally slimmer towards the front. It has a deep black color, and only the shiny silver Dell logo in the middle of the display cover stands out. The exterior of the Latitude radiates professionalism - after all a desirable quality in the business sector. 

Except for the Gorilla glass 4 protected display and metal hinges, the entire case has a rubber coating. This also fits well with its businesslike character; the rubber surface has more grip, so the device is less likely to slip out of your hand. It also feels pleasant to the touch and of high quality. Fingerprints and grease marks do not show up quickly, but when they do, they are not so easy to remove. 

Supporting the rubber surface is magnesium, which makes the Latitude 5289 very robust and stable. Even under force, the display cover warps only minimally, the wrist rest does not give way at all. The base can be dented minimally in the middle of the keyboard, but only at unrealistically high pressure. Pressure on the display has no effect on the image. The same goes for workmanship as there are no noticeable burrs or gaps. Unfortunately, Dell did have one mishap: the device came with a stripped screw at the bottom of the case. We are assuming that this was a one-off assembly error, but it is still rather unpleasant.  

Hinges play an important role in convertibles and so deserve to be examined separately. The design with two hinges is a standard for 360° convertibles; Dell has additionally designed them in a way that the display does not lie flat on the table when the device is open at 180° - unlike Lenovo and HP's competitors. Which of these two designs you prefer is a matter of taste. In any case, the hinges do a good job and hold the display securely in position without any wobbles. Unfortunately, this also means that you cannot open the display with one hand, but at least Dell added a small indentation at the front of the base. Small details like this are often not appreciated enough; the indentation makes opening the display easier.

opened to 180°
from the back/side
from the front/side
in stand mode
in tent mode
in notebook mode
bottom of base unit

Out test unit has a 12.5-inch display. This makes it the smallest of all the comparison devices, which all have 13.3-inch displays (except for the Yoga 910, which has a 13.9-inch display). However, it is not the smallest convertible - the XPS 13 2-in-1 is even more compact due to its thin bezels. The Latitude 5289 is the thickest device, but this also affords it more stability. Only the ThinkPad Yoga 370 is similarly thick. The XPS 13 2-in-1 is not just the smallest, but also the lightest comparison device. Our test unit is a little heavier at 1.3 kg (~2.9 pounds); the two Lenovos weigh the most at 1.4 kg (~3.3 lb).

Size Comparison

Dell has given the Latitude two USB Type-C ports on its left side. However, they are both "normal" USB 3.0 ports that additionally function as DisplayPort and power supply. The Latitude 5289 does not have Thunderbolt, which puts it at a disadvantage compared to its direct competitors Lenovo and HP. Apart from that, it has a good (but not excellent) port selection for a small business notebook with two USB 3.0 Type-A ports and an HDMI port. Unfortunately, Dell has followed the trend of using MicroSD slots; the same is the case for the EliteBook x360 and ThinkPad Yoga 370.

The positions of the ports are fine, although it would have been nice to have one of the USB Type-C ports on the right, to be able to charge it from either side. But this is no real disadvantage, rather a missed chance.

3.5 mm combined stereo jack, MicroSD card reader, SIM slot, USB 3.0 Type-A, Kensington lock
3.5 mm combined stereo jack, MicroSD card reader, SIM slot, USB 3.0 Type-A, Kensington lock
2x USB 3.0 Type-C (incl. DisplayPort/power supply), HDMI, USB 3.0 Type-A, smart card reader
2x USB 3.0 Type-C (incl. DisplayPort/power supply), HDMI, USB 3.0 Type-A, smart card reader

Communication

The Intel Wireless 8265 is a commonly used 2x2 AC WLAN card, especially with business notebooks. This is not surprising, since it offers a stable and fast connection even at a greater distance to the router. The Latitude 5289 is no exception. In our benchmark, the Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370 did slightly better with the same WLAN card, but the difference is not very big. 

Networking
iperf3 Client (receive) TCP 1 m 4M x10
Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370-20JJS00100
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265
675 MBit/s ∼100% +17%
HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265
613 MBit/s ∼91% +6%
Dell Latitude 5289
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265
579 MBit/s ∼86%
iperf3 Client (transmit) TCP 1 m 4M x10
Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370-20JJS00100
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265
522 MBit/s ∼100% +4%
Dell Latitude 5289
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265
502 MBit/s ∼96%
HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265
455 MBit/s ∼87% -9%

Security

Unlike its direct competitors, our test unit is not equipped with a fingerprint reader, but apparently this is available optionally. It is equipped with a smart card reader, a Kensington lock slot and TPM.

Accessories

The US version of the Latitude comes with an Active Pen. For docking, you will have to resort to the USB Type-C, as more powerful Thunderbolt 3 docks cannot be used as the device has no suitable port. For this device, you would therefore need the Dell WD15 dock, which charges the notebook via USB Type-C.

Maintenance

Three clips need to be opened at the back for maintenance. (image source: Dell)
Three clips need to be opened at the back for maintenance. (image source: Dell)

Because of the aforementioned stripped screw, we decided not to open the test unit. In theory, the bottom cover should be easy to remove, but there are some plastic clips at the back that need to be opened. Once the bottom cover is removed, all components including the cooling fan can be accessed. The keyboard is not so easy to remove, but that has become normal for Ultrabooks.

The User's Manual, which is available on Dell's Support page, can be helpful if you want to open the device.

Warranty

A three-year warranty including on-site service is the standard warranty for the Latitude 5289. At purchase, the warranty can be extended to a maximum of five years including Next-Day service.

Input Devices

Keyboard

The keyboard is a little smaller than usual, which is often the case with 12.5-inch notebooks: it is about an inch less wide. Adapting to this smaller size might take some time if you are used to a full-sized keyboard. The US keyboard also has a smaller return key, but apart from that, the 6-row layout is easy to use and has standard sizes.

Dell equips all its Latitude notebooks with good keyboards - the Latitude 5289 is no exception. The matte keys have long travel for today's standards and a clear pressure point. They are slightly concave which contributes to the comfortable typing experience. The two-level backlit keyboard makes it possible to work even in darker surroundings.

Touchpad/Touchscreen

Like many other Dell Laptops, the Latitude 5289's touchpad comes from the manufacturer Alps, while most other manufacturers use Synaptics touchpads. Dell has also foregone the Microsoft Precision touchpad standard. The result: The touchpad is ordinary at best, if not below average. The touchpad reminds us of input devices of very old laptops in many ways. It is slow and inaccurate in comparison to the Precision solution. On top of the software deficiencies, the rough surface of the touchpad has a little too much grip, so using the touchpad is neither easy nor enjoyable.

Unlike Lenovo and HP, Dell has chosen to keep a touchpad with dedicated keys for their business convertible. This has the advantage that the separate keys are easier to hit and are therefore more precise. However, the disadvantage is that the touch area is rather small at 9 x 5 cm (~3.5 x 2 in), which does not improve usage. At least the keys have a comfortable feel and a good pressure point, which gives an impression of high quality.

Overall, the touchpad cannot keep up with the input devices of HP's EliteBook x360 or Lenovo's ThinkPad Yoga 370. The latter is additionally equipped with a TrackPoint, which Dell does not use either.

At least there is another, if not two alternatives: Just like all modern convertibles, Dell has used a capacitive 10-point touchscreen, which is a very precise and good alternative to the touchpad. Another possibility is using the included Active Pen, but our test unit came without one, so we could not test this feature.

keyboard and touchpad
keyboard and touchpad

Display

Subpixel array
Subpixel array
Distinct backlight bleeding
Distinct backlight bleeding

Dell offers only one display option for this Latitude, which saves potential buyers from having to choose one. All Latitude 5289s have a 12.5-inch IPS display with LED backlighting and a resolution of 1920x1080 pixels, which corresponds to the Full HD standard. Convertible displays tend to be glossy and both our test unit and HP and Lenovo's business competitors are no exception. There is one difference though: the screen size. Both of the other manufacturers have gone for 13.3-inch screens. The Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370 also has a Full HD display only, the HP EliteBook x360, however, also has a UHD option, but we tested its Full HD display.

In its specifications, Dell says the Latitude has a screen brightness of only 255 cd/m². Our test unit exceeds that value significantly. On average, it reaches 320 cd/m², which is a good value. It is a little lower than that of the Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370, but significantly higher than the HP EliteBook x360's screen brightness. The brightness distribution of 90% is quite good. Unfortunately, the display has both PWM and backlight bleeding, although at least the former is high enough not to be a problem for most users. The backlight bleeding, however, is quite strong and can be disturbing especially with dark contents.

306
cd/m²
325
cd/m²
323
cd/m²
326
cd/m²
336
cd/m²
322
cd/m²
324
cd/m²
319
cd/m²
302
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
X-Rite i1Pro 2
Maximum: 336 cd/m² Average: 320.3 cd/m² Minimum: 220.2 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 90 %
Center on Battery: 336 cd/m²
Contrast: 988:1 (Black: 0.34 cd/m²)
ΔE Color 3.45 | - Ø
ΔE Greyscale 1.68 | - Ø
64% sRGB (Argyll) 41% AdobeRGB 1998 (Argyll)
Gamma: 2.49
Dell Latitude 5289
BOE NV12N51, , 1920x1080, 12.5
Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370-20JJS00100
Sharp LQ133M1JX15, , 1920x1080, 13.3
HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2
CMN1374, , 1920x1080, 13.3
Dell XPS 13-9365 2-in-1
1920x1080, 13.3
HP Spectre x360 13-w023dx
Chi Mei CMN1367, , 1920x1080, 13.3
Lenovo Yoga 910-13IKB-80VF004CGE
AU Optronics AUO323D / B139HAN03.2, , 3840x2160, 13.9
Response Times
-22%
-10%
25%
16%
7%
Response Time Grey 50% / Grey 80% *
42 (22, 20)
42 (21.2, 20.8)
-0%
55.2 (21.2, 34)
-31%
48 (16.4, 31.6)
-14%
33.2 (16, 17.2)
21%
46 (14, 32)
-10%
Response Time Black / White *
31 (18, 13)
32.8 (19.2, 13.6)
-6%
27.2 (7.6, 19.6)
12%
32.8 (7.6, 25.2)
-6%
28 (5.6, 22.4)
10%
24 (6, 18)
23%
PWM Frequency
531 (90)
217.4 (50)
-59%
1042 (29)
96%
Screen
-24%
-30%
-45%
-44%
-48%
Brightness
320
356
11%
256
-20%
306
-4%
319
0%
310
-3%
Brightness Distribution
90
87
-3%
83
-8%
91
1%
90
0%
80
-11%
Black Level *
0.34
0.33
3%
0.25
26%
0.19
44%
0.336
1%
0.25
26%
Contrast
988
1133
15%
1048
6%
1698
72%
996
1%
1392
41%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 *
3.45
4.7
-36%
5.13
-49%
7.7
-123%
6.21
-80%
7.86
-128%
Greyscale DeltaE2000 *
1.68
6.5
-287%
6.23
-271%
7.9
-370%
7.71
-359%
8.25
-391%
Gamma
2.49 96%
2.19 110%
2.45 98%
2.88 83%
2.36 102%
2.05 117%
CCT
6782 96%
7086 92%
6413 101%
7044 92%
6458 101%
6834 95%
Color Space (Percent of AdobeRGB 1998)
41
63.1
54%
57.84
41%
44.1
8%
58.6
43%
58
41%
Color Space (Percent of sRGB)
64
97.2
52%
88.57
38%
69.9
9%
90
41%
90
41%
Total Average (Program / Settings)
-23% / -23%
-20% / -26%
-10% / -26%
-14% / -32%
-21% / -37%

* ... smaller is better

color values
color values
gray values
gray values
saturation
saturation

The contrast (988:1) and black value (0.34) are good values for an IPS display. Subjectively, black appears inky black (apart from the bothersome backlight bleeding) and the image is sharp. After calibration, the image looks even better, so we suggest using our provided ICC profile, as long as the Latitude 5289 that needs calibrating has a panel from BOE.

12.5-inch displays often have one weak point: color space coverage. The Latitude 5289 is no exception; it reaches only 64% sRGB and 41% AdobeRGB, which are bad results. The 13-inch competitors have significantly higher values. During day-to-day use, this low color space coverage should not affect the average Office user, but does show that the used IPS display is a cheap one. You can forget image processing with this screen.

sRGB: 64%
sRGB: 64%
AdobeRGB: 41%
AdobeRGB: 41%

Despite the shiny surface, the Latitude can be used outside, thanks to its bright screen. However, the 320 cd/m² are still not quite enough for using the device in direct sunlight, as you can see from our pictures. The image was visible, but not comfortable to read. You had better find a shady spot, as using the device in the shade is very pleasant.

Outdoor use (in shade)
Outdoor use (in shade)
Outdoor use (in sunlight)
Outdoor use (in sunlight)

Display Response Times

Display response times show how fast the screen is able to change from one color to the next. Slow response times can lead to afterimages and can cause moving objects to appear blurry (ghosting). Gamers of fast-paced 3D titles should pay special attention to fast response times.
       Response Time Black to White
31 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 18 ms rise
↘ 13 ms fall
The screen shows slow response rates in our tests and will be unsatisfactory for gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.8 (minimum) to 240 (maximum) ms. » 77 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is worse than the average of all tested devices (26.6 ms).
       Response Time 50% Grey to 80% Grey
42 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 22 ms rise
↘ 20 ms fall
The screen shows slow response rates in our tests and will be unsatisfactory for gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.9 (minimum) to 636 (maximum) ms. » 52 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is similar to the average of all tested devices (42.5 ms).

Screen Flickering / PWM (Pulse-Width Modulation)

To dim the screen, some notebooks will simply cycle the backlight on and off in rapid succession - a method called Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) . This cycling frequency should ideally be undetectable to the human eye. If said frequency is too low, users with sensitive eyes may experience strain or headaches or even notice the flickering altogether.
Screen flickering / PWM detected 531 Hz90 % brightness setting

The display backlight flickers at 531 Hz (Likely utilizing PWM) Flickering detected at a brightness setting of 90 % and below. There should be no flickering or PWM above this brightness setting.

The frequency of 531 Hz is quite high, so most users sensitive to PWM should not notice any flickering.

In comparison: 55 % of all tested devices do not use PWM to dim the display. If PWM was detected, an average of 8587 (minimum: 43 - maximum: 142900) Hz was measured.

As is usual for IPS displays, the device has good viewing-angles, although the Latitude's panel is not the best representative for IPS displays. At least there are no inverted colors (unlike with TN panels), but you do lose some brightness and experience a change in color temperature from wider angels. But this does not really affect day-to-day work negatively.

Neither the two USB Type-C ports with DisplayPort, nor the HDMI port showed any problems with image output, so connecting the device to projectors or external monitors should work well.

Viewing angles of the Dell Latitude 5289
Viewing angles of the Dell Latitude 5289

Performance

Dell's Latitude 5289 covers a price range of $1284 to $2,670 with four different processor configurations. At entry level you will, however, only get an i3 processor (Core i3-7100U), a 128 GB SSD and 4 GB of RAM (LPDDR3-1866). The latter has the most severe implications as the RAM is firmly soldered on. We recommend thinking properly about which RAM configuration you need before purchase - 4 GB is quite tight in 2017. The maximum RAM available is 16 GB, but only the most expensive version ($2130) is equipped with that configuration, as well as the i7-7600U. The two lower-priced US versions can be equipped with SSDs of up to 512 GB, while the two more expensive models can be configured with up to 1 TB PCIe SSDs. Our test unit is equipped with a 256 GB SATA III SSD. The SSDs should be easily exchangeable later on.

The users have no options concerning graphics - the device comes with the normal iGPU only. But that is not surprising for a small convertible. On top of RAM, CPU and SSD, users should also take a look at the battery. Some models only have a 45 Wh battery, while our test unit has a larger 60 Wh battery.

HWiNFO
HWiNFO
CPU-Z
CPU-Z
GPU-Z Caches
GPU-Z Caches
CPU-Z Mainboard
CPU-Z Mainboard
CPU-Z Memory
CPU-Z Memory
GPU-Z
GPU-Z
LatencyMon
LatencyMon
 

Processor

The Core i5-7300U is the faster of the two Intel Core i5 CPUs of the U series (with a TDP of 15 Wh). It is used a lot less than its slower sister version, the i5-7200U, which is probably because the speed advantage is not that big and that the more expensive i5-7300U has vPro - a function that private users are not likely to need. The two cores of the i5-7300U clock at a maximum of 3.5 GHz with an average clock rate of 2.6 GHz. Please check our CPU database for more information.

In order to test a notebook's performance in day-to-day use, we make all laptops do a short endurance test: the Cinebench Multicore benchmark runs in a loop for 30 minutes. If the performance drops, we know that the full CPU performance will not be available for long during day-to-day use. We noticed this on the Latitude 5289 as well. The power dropped to about 325 points after the first round, which is just below the Core i7-7200U performance. After that, the CPU stays at that level. The reason behind this drop is the TDP (Thermal Design Power) of 15 Wh. During the first round, the CPU is allowed to consume 21 Wh for about 30 seconds, during which it can use the maximum clock rate of 3.5 GHz. After that, the TDP limit of 15 Wh sets in and the clock rate drops to 3 GHz. There is no throttling, but maximum performance is not reached either.

0102030405060708090100110120130140150160170180190200210220230240250260270280290300310320330340Tooltip
Cinebench R15 CPU Multi 64 Bit

The Latitude 5289 with the i5-7300U delivers quite good results in the individual tests - above the usual results for the i5-7200U, which typically reaches 330 points. Our test unit cannot make the most of its processor, which you can see from looking at the slightly better results of the EliteBook x360 with the same CPU. But it still beats the Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370 with the i5-7200U processor. (That device is even farther away from reaching its full potential.) You can compare more CPUs with our CPU benchmark tool.

Our test unit CPU performs just as well on battery power as when connected to a power supply.

Cinebench R15
CPU Single 64Bit
Lenovo Yoga 910-13IKB-80VF004CGE
Intel Core i7-7500U
147 Points ∼74% +1%
Dell Latitude 5289
Intel Core i5-7300U
145 Points ∼73%
HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2
Intel Core i5-7300U
144 Points ∼72% -1%
Dell XPS 13-9365 2-in-1
Intel Core i7-7Y75
130 Points ∼65% -10%
HP Spectre x360 13-w023dx
Intel Core i7-7500U
126 Points ∼63% -13%
Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370-20JJS00100
Intel Core i5-7200U
126 Points ∼63% -13%
CPU Multi 64Bit
Lenovo Yoga 910-13IKB-80VF004CGE
Intel Core i7-7500U
354 Points ∼16% +4%
HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2
Intel Core i5-7300U
346 Points ∼16% +2%
Dell Latitude 5289
Intel Core i5-7300U
340 Points ∼16%
HP Spectre x360 13-w023dx
Intel Core i7-7500U
314 Points ∼15% -8%
Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370-20JJS00100
Intel Core i5-7200U
312 Points ∼15% -8%
Dell XPS 13-9365 2-in-1
Intel Core i7-7Y75
258 Points ∼12% -24%
Cinebench R15 OpenGL 64Bit
46.69 fps
Cinebench R15 Ref. Match 64Bit
97.7 %
Cinebench R15 CPU Multi 64Bit
340 Points
Cinebench R15 CPU Single 64Bit
145 Points
Help

System Performance

Nothing bad can be said regarding system performance. Both during normal use and during the tests our test unit performed relatively well and ranks average in the benchmarks. Subjectively, everything runs smoothly.

PCMark 8
Work Score Accelerated v2
HP Spectre x360 13-w023dx
HD Graphics 620, 7500U, Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV512
4910 Points ∼75% +5%
HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2
HD Graphics 620, 7300U, Sandisk SD8TN8U-256G-1006
4803 Points ∼74% +3%
Dell Latitude 5289
HD Graphics 620, 7300U, SanDisk X400 256GB, SATA (SD8SB8U-256G)
4681 Points ∼72%
Dell XPS 13-9365 2-in-1
HD Graphics 615, 7Y75, Toshiba NVMe THNSN5256GPUK
4674 Points ∼72% 0%
Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370-20JJS00100
HD Graphics 620, 7200U, Toshiba NVMe THNSF5512GPUK
4314 Points ∼66% -8%
Home Score Accelerated v2
HP Spectre x360 13-w023dx
HD Graphics 620, 7500U, Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV512
3795 Points ∼64% +7%
HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2
HD Graphics 620, 7300U, Sandisk SD8TN8U-256G-1006
3774 Points ∼63% +6%
Lenovo Yoga 910-13IKB-80VF004CGE
HD Graphics 620, 7500U, Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV512
3555 Points ∼59% 0%
Dell Latitude 5289
HD Graphics 620, 7300U, SanDisk X400 256GB, SATA (SD8SB8U-256G)
3554 Points ∼59%
Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370-20JJS00100
HD Graphics 620, 7200U, Toshiba NVMe THNSF5512GPUK
3539 Points ∼59% 0%
Dell XPS 13-9365 2-in-1
HD Graphics 615, 7Y75, Toshiba NVMe THNSN5256GPUK
3134 Points ∼52% -12%
PCMark 8 Home Score Accelerated v2
3554 points
PCMark 8 Work Score Accelerated v2
4681 points
Help

Storage Devices

As mentioned above, our test unit contains an SSD with a capacity of 256 GB. It was produced by SanDisk and the model is X400. It is a normal SATA III SSD, but Dell's Latitude 5289 is also available with the more expensive PCIe SSDs in the US. This means the Latitude is at a disadvantage in the benchmark comparison. The EliteBook x360 is the only other device with the cheaper SATA III configuration. The test unit would probably have done better in the PCMark-Test if it had a PCIe SSD. It would be possible to mount a PCIe SSD later on, if needed.

You can compare the SanDisk X400 with other SSDs in our HDD/SSD Benchmark table.

Dell Latitude 5289
SanDisk X400 256GB, SATA (SD8SB8U-256G)
Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370-20JJS00100
Toshiba NVMe THNSF5512GPUK
HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2
Sandisk SD8TN8U-256G-1006
Dell XPS 13-9365 2-in-1
Toshiba NVMe THNSN5256GPUK
HP Spectre x360 13-w023dx
Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV512
Lenovo Yoga 910-13IKB-80VF004CGE
Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV512
CrystalDiskMark 3.0
128%
33%
130%
154%
179%
Write 4k QD32
158.8
414.5
161%
225.2
42%
250.2
58%
361.2
127%
488.7
208%
Read 4k QD32
306.2
460.8
50%
311.3
2%
411
34%
535.2
75%
570.3
86%
Write 4k
27.92
127.3
356%
56.48
102%
121.2
334%
137.9
394%
159.7
472%
Read 4k
22.73
30.55
34%
29.43
29%
32.93
45%
42.66
88%
43.5
91%
Write 512
255.6
483.1
89%
372.5
46%
410.7
61%
570.5
123%
579.6
127%
Read 512
260.8
679.9
161%
312.3
20%
966.3
271%
679
160%
701.1
169%
Write Seq
406.4
484.5
19%
443.6
9%
629.4
55%
570.7
40%
578.4
42%
Read Seq
423.7
1070
153%
467.1
10%
1206
185%
1376
225%
1412
233%
SanDisk X400 256GB, SATA (SD8SB8U-256G)
Sequential Read: 423.7 MB/s
Sequential Write: 406.4 MB/s
512K Read: 260.8 MB/s
512K Write: 255.6 MB/s
4K Read: 22.73 MB/s
4K Write: 27.92 MB/s
4K QD32 Read: 306.2 MB/s
4K QD32 Write: 158.8 MB/s

Graphics

The Intel HD Graphics 620 is one of the most tested graphics unit of the current notebook generation. After all, the GT2 based (24 Execution Units) iGPU is featured in every device with a U series processor - which is basically the standard for notebooks nowadays.

The device's storage solution is crucial to the performance of the HD 620, as it has no memory of its own. If only one memory module is available, as is the case in the ThinkPad Yoga 370, the maximum performance is limited. This is called single channel mode. If there is a second memory module available, the GPU can perform better thanks to dual-channel mode. In the case of the Latitude 5289, the memory is soldered on and runs in dual-channel mode. That should be the main reason why the test unit does quite a good job in the benchmarks. It is 18 to 22 percent faster than the ThinkPad Yoga 370's single channel mode. As always, you can also compare GPUs in our GPU Benchmark Tool.

The GPU performs just as well in battery mode and on power supply.

3DMark 11 - 1280x720 Performance GPU
Dell Latitude 5289
Intel HD Graphics 620, Intel Core i5-7300U
1627 Points ∼100%
Lenovo Yoga 910-13IKB-80VF004CGE
Intel HD Graphics 620, Intel Core i7-7500U
1623 Points ∼100% 0%
HP Spectre x360 13-w023dx
Intel HD Graphics 620, Intel Core i7-7500U
1560 Points ∼96% -4%
HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2
Intel HD Graphics 620, Intel Core i5-7300U
1476 Points ∼91% -9%
Dell XPS 13-9365 2-in-1
Intel HD Graphics 615, Intel Core i7-7Y75
1370 Points ∼84% -16%
Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370-20JJS00100
Intel HD Graphics 620, Intel Core i5-7200U
1338 Points ∼82% -18%
3DMark
1920x1080 Fire Strike Graphics
Dell Latitude 5289
Intel HD Graphics 620, Intel Core i5-7300U
1081 Points ∼100%
Lenovo Yoga 910-13IKB-80VF004CGE
Intel HD Graphics 620, Intel Core i7-7500U
1045 Points ∼97% -3%
HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2
Intel HD Graphics 620, Intel Core i5-7300U
972 Points ∼90% -10%
HP Spectre x360 13-w023dx
Intel HD Graphics 620, Intel Core i7-7500U
964 Points ∼89% -11%
Dell XPS 13-9365 2-in-1
Intel HD Graphics 615, Intel Core i7-7Y75
917 Points ∼85% -15%
Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370-20JJS00100
Intel HD Graphics 620, Intel Core i5-7200U
827 Points ∼77% -23%
1280x720 Cloud Gate Standard Graphics
Lenovo Yoga 910-13IKB-80VF004CGE
Intel HD Graphics 620, Intel Core i7-7500U
9060 Points ∼100% +6%
Dell Latitude 5289
Intel HD Graphics 620, Intel Core i5-7300U
8562 Points ∼95%
HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2
Intel HD Graphics 620, Intel Core i5-7300U
8220 Points ∼91% -4%
HP Spectre x360 13-w023dx
Intel HD Graphics 620, Intel Core i7-7500U
7969 Points ∼88% -7%
Dell XPS 13-9365 2-in-1
Intel HD Graphics 615, Intel Core i7-7Y75
7839 Points ∼87% -8%
Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370-20JJS00100
Intel HD Graphics 620, Intel Core i5-7200U
7059 Points ∼78% -18%
3DMark 11 Performance
1787 points
3DMark Cloud Gate Standard Score
6359 points
3DMark Fire Strike Score
931 points
Help

Gaming Performance

When you hear the name "Latitude", gaming is probably the last thing you will think of. Still, gaming probably plays a role for some people, as diligent keyboard-warriors might like to treat themselves to a quick game after work.

But of course the Latitude 5289 is not made for that - which becomes clear in the game benchmarks. Current games are a complete no-go and even older games are not playable with high details and 1080p.

If you want to play games in good quality, you had better look for a multimedia or gaming laptop.

low med. high ultra
BioShock Infinite (2013) 53.632.627.78.6fps
Company of Heroes 2 (2013) 22.6fps
Rise of the Tomb Raider (2016) 20.8fps

Emissions

System Noise

Noise characteristics
Noise characteristics

The test unit's fan is nice and quiet. While idling, the cooling fan is turned off, and even under load, it does not run too high. It is clearly audible, but not disturbing.

What is more disturbing is the penetrating coil whine that is regularly audible during use. This is a clear minus point for sensitive users and will negatively impact our total rating.

Noise Level

Idle
30.5 / 30.5 / 30.5 dB(A)
Load
36 / 34.6 dB(A)
 
 
 
30 dB
silent
40 dB(A)
audible
50 dB(A)
loud
 
min: dark, med: mid, max: light   Audix TM1, Arta (15 cm distance)   environment noise: 30.5 dB(A)
dB(A) 0102030405060708090Deep BassMiddle BassHigh BassLower RangeMidsHigher MidsLower HighsMid HighsUpper HighsSuper Highs2033.331.330.73233.32533.629.633.138.133.6313439.83336.1344030.130.931.131.530.15030.230.327.731.430.26329.128.226.92829.18027.225.92628.127.210025.926.626.62625.912525.325.625.425.225.316023.324.423.82323.320023.5242323.723.525022.822.622.321.822.831522.422.321.620.822.440021.921.219.920.421.950023.222.619.719.523.26302321.418.719.22380022.421.318.618.622.4100027.725.218.517.927.712502522.817.617.925160024.522.417.817.624.520002623.517.517.626250024.52317.417.724.5315024.826.217.917.724.8400024.62118.117.924.6500020.419.218.418.220.4630019.518.918.418.419.5800018.918.518.718.418.91000018.918.518.518.418.91250019.318.518.518.419.3160001918.418.718.319SPL3634.630.530.536N2.32.11.41.42.3median 23.2Dell Latitude 5289median 22.4median 18.6median 18.4median 23.2Delta1.821.61.81.835.335.534.53336.934.934.634.235.73231.630.731.929.929.330.528.529.827.428.428.224.725.226.128.726.127.226.927.626.126.427.626.323.624.725.523.921.523.32423.922.221.524.422.821.922.623.32220.420.922.320.619.619.721.820.41918.821.621.11917.623.119.618.417.221.620.918.316.323.720.519162320.819.215.72421.919.915.425.223.420.715.127.824.321.715.328.324.919.115.326.918.716.615.623.317.316.215.820.716.61615.91916.316.115.918.416.416.11618.216.816.315.818.833.731.228.636.71.91.51.12.4median 20.9Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370-20JJS00100median 19.1median 16median 23.32.42.42.31.5hearing rangehide median Fan Noise

Temperature

Stress test (Prime95 & FurMark)
Stress test (Prime95 & FurMark)

As is typical for an Ultrabook, the Latitude 5289 remains completely cool while idling. It does heat up noticeably under load in some areas, although a temperature of 49 °C (~120 °F) is still acceptable. Luckily, the wrist rest remains cool. The bottom of the base heats up in some areas, not enough to have to worry about burning yourself.

Taking a look at the internal temperature values during the stress test, you can see that the stress test reflects the results of the Cinebench loop test quite well. The system can go over the TDP limit for about 30 seconds - although in this case the CPU clocks at only 3 GHz as the iGPU is running at full capacity as well. After that, the CPU clock rate sinks to 1.8 GHz at which it stays for the remainder of the test. These results show that the TPD does cause throttling, which is typical for Ultrabook processors. The manufacturer could probably avoid this by increasing the TDP to 25 Wh, but then the temperatures would probably increase a lot, as these are held in check by the throttling.

The 3DMark11 test that we did after the stress test brought average results.

Max. Load
 42.8 °C49 °C38.7 °C 
 35.7 °C42.7 °C33 °C 
 28.5 °C30.2 °C29.4 °C 
Maximum: 49 °C
Average: 36.7 °C
33.9 °C33.2 °C44.4 °C
30.1 °C39.8 °C37 °C
28.8 °C32.7 °C32.3 °C
Maximum: 44.4 °C
Average: 34.7 °C
Power Supply (max.)  35.8 °C | Room Temperature 20.7 °C | FIRT 550-Pocket

Speakers

The stereo speakers are placed at the bottom, near the front of the base unit. The sound is directed out of the case via the bottom of the base. Therefore, the quality of the sound depends on what the device is standing on; if it is standing on something soft, the sound will be muted. The Latitude's sound itself is nothing special and rather typical for notebook speakers: low frequencies are hardly audible and the sound is not particularly loud.

The sound quality improves significantly when you connect external speakers or headphones via the flawless 3.5mm combined audio jack.

dB(A) 0102030405060708090Deep BassMiddle BassHigh BassLower RangeMidsHigher MidsLower HighsMid HighsUpper HighsSuper Highs2032.83232.82531.938.131.93133.636.133.64030.431.530.45029.431.429.46328.92828.98027.628.127.610027.12627.112527.925.227.916030.92330.920038.823.738.825047.921.847.931552.520.852.540054.820.454.850056.919.556.963057.119.257.180065.618.665.6100061.617.961.6125061.917.961.9160058.517.658.5200061.517.661.5250061.517.761.5315062.617.762.6400056.117.956.150005918.259630056.818.456.8800068.318.468.31000069.618.469.61250060.718.460.71600056.818.356.8SPL74.530.574.5N33.71.433.7median 57.1Dell Latitude 5289median 18.4median 57.1Delta6.51.86.535.335.132.931.831.83236.535.132.428.93328.936.328.848.32761.52752.924.860.92462.822.763.32269.521.267.82174.82075.919.472.718.97117.770.117.86917.671.817.668.117.671.417.673.717.670.417.571.617.671.617.669.617.459.717.583.630.662.51.5median 69.6Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHzmedian 17.84.62.4hearing rangehide median Pink Noise
Dell Latitude 5289 audio analysis

(-) | not very loud speakers (69 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(-) | nearly no bass - on average 19.6% lower than median
(±) | linearity of bass is average (11.1% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(+) | balanced mids - only 3.2% away from median
(±) | linearity of mids is average (7.7% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(±) | higher highs - on average 5.2% higher than median
(±) | linearity of highs is average (9.5% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(±) | linearity of overall sound is average (20.7% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 44% of all tested devices in this class were better, 7% similar, 49% worse
» The best had a delta of 11%, average was 23%, worst was 53%
Compared to all devices tested
» 45% of all tested devices were better, 7% similar, 48% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz audio analysis

(+) | speakers can play relatively loud (83.6 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(±) | reduced bass - on average 11.3% lower than median
(±) | linearity of bass is average (14.2% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(+) | balanced mids - only 2.4% away from median
(+) | mids are linear (5.5% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(+) | balanced highs - only 2% away from median
(+) | highs are linear (4.5% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(+) | overall sound is linear (9.3% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 1% of all tested devices in this class were better, 1% similar, 97% worse
» The best had a delta of 9%, average was 19%, worst was 41%
Compared to all devices tested
» 2% of all tested devices were better, 0% similar, 98% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

Frequency diagram in comparison (checkboxes above can be turned on/off)

Energy Management

Power Consumption

The Latitude 5289 has great values, especially while idling. Out of all comparison devices with 15 W U processors, it is clearly the most energy-efficient device. Only the Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 is better - but that is equipped with a considerably more energy-efficient Y processor. At least the minimal idle value is lower in the Latitude 5289 despite the stronger CPU. Dell did a good job here.

The test unit comes with a 65 Wh power supply with a USB-C connector. The 65 Wh are more than enough, theoretically Dell could have also used a 45 Wh power supply.

Power Consumption
Off / Standbydarklight 0.68 / 1.5 Watt
Idledarkmidlight 2.7 / 5.1 / 7.6 Watt
Load midlight 33 / 29 Watt
 color bar
Key: min: dark, med: mid, max: light        Metrahit Energy
Dell Latitude 5289
7300U, HD Graphics 620, SanDisk X400 256GB, SATA (SD8SB8U-256G), IPS LED, 1920x1080, 12.5
Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370-20JJS00100
7200U, HD Graphics 620, Toshiba NVMe THNSF5512GPUK, IPS LED, 1920x1080, 13.3
HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2
7300U, HD Graphics 620, Sandisk SD8TN8U-256G-1006, IPS, 1920x1080, 13.3
Dell XPS 13-9365 2-in-1
7Y75, HD Graphics 615, Toshiba NVMe THNSN5256GPUK, IPS, 1920x1080, 13.3
HP Spectre x360 13-w023dx
7500U, HD Graphics 620, Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV512, IPS, 1920x1080, 13.3
Lenovo Yoga 910-13IKB-80VF004CGE
7500U, HD Graphics 620, Samsung PM951 NVMe MZVLV512, IPS, 3840x2160, 13.9
Power Consumption
-17%
-9%
17%
-30%
-20%
Idle Minimum *
2.7
3.6
-33%
3.2
-19%
3.1
-15%
5.5
-104%
4.3
-59%
Idle Average *
5.1
7.2
-41%
5.5
-8%
4.3
16%
6.7
-31%
6.3
-24%
Idle Maximum *
7.6
8.4
-11%
6.5
14%
4.9
36%
7.1
7%
9
-18%
Load Average *
33
29.9
9%
29.7
10%
24.3
26%
33.1
-0%
32.7
1%
Load Maximum *
29
32.2
-11%
41.3
-42%
22.8
21%
35.2
-21%
28.8
1%

* ... smaller is better

Battery Runtime

The low consumption rates and comparatively enormous 60 Wh battery that our test unit is equipped with ensure excellent battery runtimes. During our practically oriented Wi-Fi test, the Latitude even beats the EliteBook x360 , which already has very good runtimes. Our test unit was on for 28 hours during our idle test - the longest time by far. It only lagged behind a little while testing its battery runtime under load.

It takes about 1.5 hours for the battery to recharge fully, which is quite fast for a 60 Wh battery.

Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
28h 48min
WiFi Surfing v1.3 (Edge)
11h 48min
Load (maximum brightness)
2h 16min
Dell Latitude 5289
7300U, HD Graphics 620, 60 Wh
Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370-20JJS00100
7200U, HD Graphics 620, 51 Wh
HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2
7300U, HD Graphics 620, 57 Wh
Dell XPS 13-9365 2-in-1
7Y75, HD Graphics 615, 46 Wh
HP Spectre x360 13-w023dx
7500U, HD Graphics 620, 57.8 Wh
Lenovo Yoga 910-13IKB-80VF004CGE
7500U, HD Graphics 620, 78 Wh
Battery Runtime
-24%
16%
-6%
-20%
-6%
Reader / Idle
1728
1163
-33%
1387
-20%
971
-44%
1233
-29%
1069
-38%
WiFi v1.3
708
488
-31%
630
-11%
686
-3%
558
-21%
644
-9%
Load
136
127
-7%
244
79%
175
29%
121
-11%
174
28%
H.264
576
659

Verdict

Pros

+ robust case
+ easy typing on the keyboard
+ cooling fan is often turned off
+ a good selection of ports for day-to-day use
+ bright display
+ great battery runtime

Cons

- disappointing touchpad
- display: low color space coverage and too much backlight bleeding
- disturbing coil whine
- no Thunderbolt 3
The Dell Latitude 5289: test unit provided by Dell.
The Dell Latitude 5289: test unit provided by Dell.

Choosing a business convertible is not easy. After all the ThinkPad Yoga 370 and the EliteBook x360 alone are two good alternatives. With the Latitude 5289, Dell has contributed an interesting competitor. The biggest advantage of today's test unit: its battery runtime. Thanks to low energy consumption and a very large battery, the Latitude is the best device in this area. The robust case and comfortable keyboard are also worth considering. The Latitude 5289's cooling fan remains quiet thanks to its ULV CPU. The selection of ports is suitable for a business device, which brings us to the negative aspects.

A device that is clearly above the $1,000 mark should be equipped with Thunderbolt 3 and its competitors all feature the port. The cooling fan does not run very often, but Dell has not managed to get rid of the bothersome coil whine. The keyboard is good; the touchpad, however, is not impressive; especially in comparison to the competitors from HP and Lenovo, the touchpad Dell chose is not great. Unlike Lenovo and HP, Dell has chosen to keep the 12.5-inch display. This can be an advantage or a disadvantage: you have less work surface, but also less weight. A typical disadvantage of 12.5-inch displays is the lacking color space coverage. On top of that, the display has high backlight bleeding. At least it is bright enough to use outdoors.

Dell has created a good convertible: its long battery runtime is particularly captivating. But it is not easy to keep up in this highly competitive market, and Dell did make some mistakes.

The Latitude 5289 is definitely not a bad convertible. If you are looking for a convertible notebook with the longest possible battery runtime, then this could even be a recommendable choice. However, the alternatives - ThinkPad Yoga 370 and EliteBook x360 - equally have their strong points. The entry-level model of the Latitude costs less, but you also get a worse configuration with only 4 GB of soldered-on working memory. Overall, the Latitude has a hard time asserting itself against its competitors. It could beat them with a better 13.3-inch display and an improved touchpad. Instead, it remains in third place despite its great battery runtime, particularly because both Lenovo's and HP's models offer good battery runtimes as well.

Dell Latitude 5289 - 05/16/2017 v6
Benjamin Herzig

Chassis
88 / 98 → 90%
Keyboard
85%
Pointing Device
78%
Connectivity
65 / 80 → 81%
Weight
71 / 78 → 83%
Battery
95%
Display
83%
Games Performance
58 / 68 → 85%
Application Performance
85 / 87 → 98%
Temperature
89%
Noise
88%
Audio
46 / 91 → 50%
Camera
43 / 85 → 50%
Average
75%
84%
Convertible - Weighted Average

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Dell Latitude 5289 (i5, 256GB, 8GB) Convertible Review
Benjamin Herzig, 2017-05-19 (Update: 2017-05-31)