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Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1 (i5-8350U) Convertible Review

Surface Pro Pro? The Latitude 5290 seeks to be a Surface Pro for business professionals. Equipped with an 8th-gen Intel SoC, NVMe SSD, and a bright and vivid touchscreen display, can this $1,932 convertible make a compelling case for its value as a business asset?

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As we continue our romp through the most recent batch of Dell chipset refreshes, our next candidate is arguably the closest thing to a business-grade Microsoft Surface Pro that currently exists. Upon first glance, the two devices are nearly identical in a lot of ways, right down to the fundamental kickstand design and keyboard type cover. The 3:2 aspect ratio is also a common trait, as is the slotted edge-based vent design. However, under the hood, a lot of things are different.

On the other hand, last year’s Latitude 5285 is practically the same device as the 5290 2-in-1; the latter simply introduces an 8th-generation Intel SoC and some (very) minor revisions elsewhere. In our previous review nearly a year ago, we praised the Dell’s solid performance, bright display, quiet operation, and ease of maintenance. Meanwhile, we also lamented its proclivity for extremely hot operation, a lack of Thunderbolt connectivity, relatively heavy weight, disappointing warranty, and high price. At first glance, at least a few of these items haven’t changed since the last review—but our focus today will be on what has improved, and whether or not those improvements can justify the cost of the Latitude in comparison with other business competitors and even the Surface Pro itself.

Today’s review unit features a quad-core Intel Core i5-8350U, 8 GB LPDDR3 RAM, a 256 GB Toshiba NVMe SSD, and a 1920x1280 3:2 aspect ratio touch display. It also includes the keyboard type cover and the Dell Active Pen, all for around $1,932 as of this writing direct from Dell. Does the Latitude 5290 2-in-1 do enough to keep up with its peers?

Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1 (Latitude 5290 Series)
Graphics adapter
Intel UHD Graphics 620, Core: 300-1100 MHz, 22.20.16.4815
Memory
8192 MB 
, LPDDR3
Display
12.3 inch 3:2, 1920 x 1280 pixel 179 PPI, yes; 10-point multi-touch, native pen support, SHP1479, IPS, glossy: yes, detachable screen
Mainboard
Intel Sunrise Point-LP
Storage
Toshiba XG5 KXG50ZNV256G, 256 GB 
Connections
3 USB 3.0 / 3.1 Gen1, 2 DisplayPort, 1 Kensington Lock, 1 Docking Station Port, Audio Connections: 3.5 mm combo audio, Card Reader: microSD, 1 Fingerprint Reader
Networking
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265 (a/b/g/n/ac), Bluetooth 4.2
Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 9.75 x 292 x 210 ( = 0.38 x 11.5 x 8.27 in)
Battery
42 Wh, 5250 mAh Lithium-Ion
Operating System
Microsoft Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit
Camera
Primary Camera: 8 MPix
Secondary Camera: 5 MPix
Additional features
Speakers: 2.0, side edge-mounted, Keyboard: Chiclet, Keyboard Light: yes, 12 Months Warranty
Weight
1.278 kg ( = 45.08 oz / 2.82 pounds), Power Supply: 254 g ( = 8.96 oz / 0.56 pounds)

 

Case

As before with the Latitude 5285, the Latitude 5290’s build quality is top-notch. Construction consists of magnesium-alloy material which is more common among Dell’s 7000 series Latitude notebooks than with the normally primarily plastic 5000 series. The result is an extremely rigid device which resists torsion about as well as the Surface Pro (which is also built out of magnesium) and which seems poised to tackle the everyday rigors of business and travel. The basic aesthetic—matte black, with the exception of the reflective screen finish and bezels—also jives well with the environment of its target market. Much more can be read about the design of the kickstand and keyboard cover in our previous review of the Latitude 5285.

The same MIL-STD 810G tests apply to the 5290, and its dimensions have not changed since our review of the 5285. The device weighs in at 1.278 kg and is 15 mm thick with the keyboard type cover attached (and 9.75 mm thick in tablet form only). The overall size is also nearly identical to that of the Surface Pro 2017, measuring just 1.25 mm thicker and 9 mm wider—almost undetectable in daily use. The latest Surface Pro is lighter, however, by some 200 grams.

The same MIL-STD 810G tests apply to the 5290, and its dimensions have not changed since our review of the 5285. The device weighs in at 1.278 kg and is 15 mm thick with the keyboard type cover attached (and 9.75 mm thick in tablet form only). The overall size is also nearly identical to that of the Surface Pro 2017, measuring just 1.25 mm thicker and 9 mm wider—almost undetectable in daily use. The latest Surface Pro is lighter, however, by some 200 grams.

Connectivity

Port selection has not changed since the Latitude 5285, but apart from the conspicuous lack of Thunderbolt, that’s not a bad thing: for starters, users get three total USB ports (one USB Type-A 3.1 Gen 1 port with powershare and two USB Type-C ports, both of which double as DisplayPort and can be used for charging the device). There’s also still a microSD slot and (on WWAN-equipped models) a microSIM slot, both of which are located underneath the kickstand (and so which are convenient for permanently-installed cards). That’s a pretty decent setup for a tablet.

Top: Power button
Top: Power button
Bottom: Docking connector
Bottom: Docking connector
Left: audio/headset, volume rocker, USB 3.1 Gen 1 powershare, 2x USB Type-C/DisplayPort/charging port
Left: audio/headset, volume rocker, USB 3.1 Gen 1 powershare, 2x USB Type-C/DisplayPort/charging port
Right: Kensington Lock, smart card, Windows button
Right: Kensington Lock, smart card, Windows button

SD Card Reader

The integrated microSD card reader posted greatly improved numbers (over the Latitude 5285) in our tests, but we have also since begun using a faster card, so it isn't clear whether the reader is actually faster or if the speed increases are solely a result of the card choice. Regardless, using a Toshiba Exceria Pro M501 UHS-II as our test media, we recorded an average sequential read speed of 211.8 MB/s, which is easily the fastest of all the devices in our lineup, and some 144% faster than the Latitude 5285. Our standard JPG copy test was equally impressive, with the result of 142.2 MB/s representing a 122% premium over last year’s Latitude.

The card reader hides beneath the kickstand for secure (semi-permanent) installation of a card
The card reader hides beneath the kickstand for secure (semi-permanent) installation of a card
SDCardreader Transfer Speed
average JPG Copy Test (av. of 3 runs)
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro M501 UHS-II)
142.2 MB/s ∼100%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro M501)
79.8 MB/s ∼56% -44%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
72.62 MB/s ∼51% -49%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
  (Toshiba THN-M401S0640E2)
64 MB/s ∼45% -55%
Average of class Office
  (16.5 - 191, n=203)
61.7 MB/s ∼43% -57%
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro M401 64 GB)
53.8 MB/s ∼38% -62%
maximum AS SSD Seq Read Test (1GB)
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro M501 UHS-II)
211.8 MB/s ∼100%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II)
93.77 MB/s ∼44% -56%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro M501)
87.4 MB/s ∼41% -59%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
  (Toshiba THN-M401S0640E2)
86.9 MB/s ∼41% -59%
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
  (Toshiba Exceria Pro M401 64 GB)
86.5 MB/s ∼41% -59%
Average of class Office
  (9.5 - 255, n=182)
79.6 MB/s ∼38% -62%

Communication

Every device in our lineup leverages the same popular WLAN adapter: the Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265, which has long been a favorite amongst laptop manufacturers. Although the transmit result of 305 Mb/s was lower than average, the results were overall as expected (the receive result was, by contrast, a very fast 653 Mb/s). Given the fact that the antenna design also does not appear to have changed since the Latitude 5285, we should expect similar real-world performance.

The two cameras (5 MP front-facing and 8 MP rear-facing) have not changed since the previous model, so please refer to last year’s review for more information on them.

The internal Intel WLAN adapter
The internal Intel WLAN adapter
The rear-facing 8 MP webcam
The rear-facing 8 MP webcam
Networking
iperf3 Client (receive) TCP 1 m 4M x10
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265
653 MBit/s ∼100%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265
586 MBit/s ∼90% -10%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265
569 MBit/s ∼87% -13%
Average of class Office
  (5 - 688, n=137)
469 MBit/s ∼72% -28%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265
312 MBit/s ∼48% -52%
iperf3 Client (transmit) TCP 1 m 4M x10
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265
446 MBit/s ∼100% +46%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265
440 MBit/s ∼99% +44%
Average of class Office
  (34 - 688, n=137)
433 MBit/s ∼97% +42%
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265
305 MBit/s ∼68%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265
246 MBit/s ∼55% -19%

Security (business devices)

As before, the Latitude 5290 2-in-1 (optionally) features TPM 2.0 along with a rear-mounted touch fingerprint reader, NFC, and a Smart Card reader. There’s also an optional Windows Hello IR camera, The usual security and management software bundles also apply, such as the Dell Data Protection and Endpoint Security Suite. During our testing, the fingerprint reader and Windows Hello worked quickly and conveniently in all situations.

The touch fingerprint reader works well.
The touch fingerprint reader works well.

Accessories

Our particular Latitude 5290 2-in-1 configuration includes the Dell Latitude 2-in-1 Travel Keyboard ($130) and Dell Active Pen ($60), though normally these items are sold separately. The accessories haven’t changed since the Latitude 5285 2-in-1, so businesses which were previously using the versions sold for that model can seamlessly transition to the 5290 without any compatibility repercussions.

We’d also like to draw attention to the Dell Notebook Power Bank Plus ($150 MSRP), which we covered extensively in our previous review. It’s a very versatile accessory which will likely come in handy for owners of the Latitude 5290 given what we’ll later discuss regarding power consumption and battery runtimes.

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Maintenance

As with the Latitude 5285, maintenance is the big story with the Latitude 5290 2-in-1. Unlike most other tablets, the Latitude is relatively easy to disassemble—provided you’re careful in prying around the perimeter during the screen removal process—and the battery, WLAN adapter, solid-state drive, and cooling fan are all simple to replace. This along with connectivity are probably the two most significant advantages that it boasts over consumer-grade competitors such as the Microsoft Surface Pro (which essentially can’t even be disassembled without destroying something in the process).

Once inside, numerous components are replaceable
Once inside, numerous components are replaceable
Our review unit also included an open WWAN slot, which also doubles as an M.2 2230 slot
Our review unit also included an open WWAN slot, which also doubles as an M.2 2230 slot

Warranty

Dell still only supplies a 1-year on-site warranty (after remote diagnosis) as standard with the Latitude 5290, a deficiency which separates it from its higher-end 7000-series counterparts. Upgrades to longer warranty term periods, ProSupport, and Accidental Damage Protection (among other options) remain available for an additional cost.

Input Devices

Keyboard, Touchpad, and Touchscreen

As previously mentioned, the Dell Latitude 2-in-1 Travel Keyboard (sold separately but included with our particular configuration) has not changed since the Latitude 5285. To briefly summarize our thoughts on the keyboard and touchpad, typing is comfortable and on par with that of the Surface Pro Type Cover, though also like the Type Cover, the flex and keystroke noise are both rather obvious when the cover is propped up at an incline (it attaches magnetically along the bottom bezel of the tablet when in this form, again, like the Surface Pro). The keyboard features a two-step backlight for easy viewing in darker environments; we found the backlight to be evenly-distributed and attractive. The Alps clickpad, meanwhile, is probably most closely comparable to that of the XPS 13, with well-defined feedback and excellent gesture interpretation. Finally, the touchscreen remains very good, with edge swipes and gestures flawlessly supported.

The keyboard is very good for a detachable convertible device
The keyboard is very good for a detachable convertible device
The touchpad also exceeded our expectations
The touchpad also exceeded our expectations

Display

The Latitude 5290 2-in-1 features just a single display option: a 12.3-inch 1920x1280 IPS touchscreen with a 3:2 aspect ratio. Although the screen shares the same aspect ratio as the Surface Pro, the resolution is considerably less—but that’s unlikely to matter much in everyday use, especially for office users. The panel is protected by an edge-to-edge layer of Gorilla Glass 4, which Dell specifies is “anti-reflective and anti-smudge”. Truth be told, we found it to be highly reflective, though it does work to diffuse light sources to some degree.

Dell specifies that the display carries some 340 nits in brightness; our initial (subjective) impressions were that it seems much brighter than this. Color and contrast also seem to be good.

Subpixel array, Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Subpixel array, Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Extremely minor backlight clouding
Extremely minor backlight clouding
563.9
cd/m²
554.8
cd/m²
589.3
cd/m²
530.4
cd/m²
548
cd/m²
546.5
cd/m²
524.1
cd/m²
504
cd/m²
543.7
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
X-Rite i1Pro Basic 2
Maximum: 589.3 cd/m² Average: 545 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 86 %
Center on Battery: 548 cd/m²
Contrast: 1075:1 (Black: 0.51 cd/m²)
ΔE Color 3.65 | 0.8-29.43 Ø6.3, calibrated: 1.81
ΔE Greyscale 5.5 | 0.64-98 Ø6.6
99.1% sRGB (Argyll) 65.2% AdobeRGB 1998 (Argyll)
Gamma: 2.154
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
SHP1479, IPS, 12.3, 1920x1280
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
BOE06DC, IPS, 12.3, 1920x1280
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
LG Display LP123WQ112604, IPS, 12.3, 2736x1824
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
Samsung SDC4A49, IPS, 12.3, 2716x1824
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
LSN120QL01L01, IPS, 12, 2160x1440
Toshiba Portege Z20t-C-121
Toshiba TOS508F, IPS, 12.5, 1920x1080
Response Times
-17%
387%
25%
-0%
-4%
Response Time Grey 50% / Grey 80% *
56.8 (26.8, 30)
42.4 (20.4, 22)
25%
37 (16, 21)
35%
45.6 (23.6, 22)
20%
28.4 (15.2, 13.2)
50%
61 (28, 33)
-7%
Response Time Black / White *
36 (19.6, 16.4)
30.8 (18, 12.8)
14%
25 (13, 12)
31%
21.6 (9.2, 12.4)
40%
22.8 (13.6, 9.2)
37%
36 (7, 29)
-0%
PWM Frequency
1852 (98)
210.1 (99)
-89%
22130 (55)
1095%
2119 (50)
14%
221.2 (49)
-88%
Screen
-1%
-1%
10%
-14%
-49%
Brightness middle
548
523.2
-5%
482
-12%
443
-19%
388.1
-29%
354
-35%
Brightness
545
522
-4%
466
-14%
446
-18%
344
-37%
330
-39%
Brightness Distribution
86
88
2%
92
7%
88
2%
78
-9%
86
0%
Black Level *
0.51
0.42
18%
0.395
23%
0.41
20%
0.39
24%
0.63
-24%
Contrast
1075
1246
16%
1220
13%
1080
0%
995
-7%
562
-48%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 *
3.65
4
-10%
4
-10%
2.6
29%
4.6
-26%
8.28
-127%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 max. *
7.15
8.6
-20%
7.2
-1%
4
44%
9.1
-27%
12.71
-78%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 calibrated *
1.81
Greyscale DeltaE2000 *
5.5
5.5
-0%
5.7
-4%
3
45%
6.1
-11%
9.15
-66%
Gamma
2.154 111%
2.16 111%
2.28 105%
2.38 101%
2.07 116%
2.73 88%
CCT
7052 92%
7546 86%
7950 82%
6780 96%
7104 91%
5953 109%
Color Space (Percent of AdobeRGB 1998)
65.2
64.86
-1%
62
-5%
62.6
-4%
59
-10%
40
-39%
Color Space (Percent of sRGB)
99.1
93.97
-5%
96
-3%
98
-1%
91
-8%
63
-36%
Total Average (Program / Settings)
-9% / -5%
193% / 89%
18% / 13%
-7% / -11%
-27% / -42%

* ... smaller is better

Sure enough, we measured 545 cd/m² average brightness, which is roughly in line with that of the 5285 2-in-1. Thanks to a relatively low black value of 0.51 cd/m², contrast is also very good at 1075:1. Luminosity is fairly evenly-distributed across the surface of the panel; we measured a brightness distribution of 86%.

The display also manages to cover virtually 100 percent of sRGB and 65.2 percent of AdobeRGB; this is roughly in line with the rest of the competition (except for the Toshiba Portege, which barely manages 40 percent of AdobeRGB).

vs. sRGB
vs. sRGB
vs. AdobeRGB
vs. AdobeRGB
vs. Microsoft Surface Pro (2017)
vs. Microsoft Surface Pro (2017)
vs. HP Elite x2 1012
vs. HP Elite x2 1012

CalMAN measurements reveal decent color accuracy pre-calibration, with ColorChecker/Greyscale DeltaE2000 averages of 3.65 and 5.5 respectively. Total Gamma of 2.154 and a CCT average of 7052 are also reasonably good, so unless professional photo editing or graphic design is on the agenda, users needn’t stress about professional calibration. Having said that, we measured a post-calibration ColorChecker DeltaE average of 1.81, so there are of course benefits to putting in the work.

Color analysis (pre-calibration)
Color analysis (pre-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (pre-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (pre-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (pre-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (pre-calibration)
Color analysis (post-calibration)
Color analysis (post-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (post-calibration)
Saturation sweeps (post-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (post-calibration)
Grayscale analysis (post-calibration)

Display Response Times

Display response times show how fast the screen is able to change from one color to the next. Slow response times can lead to afterimages and can cause moving objects to appear blurry (ghosting). Gamers of fast-paced 3D titles should pay special attention to fast response times.
       Response Time Black to White
36 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 19.6 ms rise
↘ 16.4 ms fall
The screen shows slow response rates in our tests and will be unsatisfactory for gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.8 (minimum) to 240 (maximum) ms. » 90 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is worse than the average of all tested devices (26.1 ms).
       Response Time 50% Grey to 80% Grey
56.8 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 26.8 ms rise
↘ 30 ms fall
The screen shows slow response rates in our tests and will be unsatisfactory for gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.9 (minimum) to 636 (maximum) ms. » 92 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is worse than the average of all tested devices (41.7 ms).

Screen Flickering / PWM (Pulse-Width Modulation)

To dim the screen, some notebooks will simply cycle the backlight on and off in rapid succession - a method called Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) . This cycling frequency should ideally be undetectable to the human eye. If said frequency is too low, users with sensitive eyes may experience strain or headaches or even notice the flickering altogether.
Screen flickering / PWM detected 1852 Hz ≤ 98 % brightness setting

The display backlight flickers at 1852 Hz (Likely utilizing PWM) Flickering detected at a brightness setting of 98 % and below. There should be no flickering or PWM above this brightness setting.

The frequency of 1852 Hz is quite high, so most users sensitive to PWM should not notice any flickering.

In comparison: 54 % of all tested devices do not use PWM to dim the display. If PWM was detected, an average of 10570 (minimum: 43 - maximum: 588200) Hz was measured.

Although we did detect PWM flickering from the display at all brightness levels 98% and below, the frequency of 1.852 KHz is very high and therefore unlikely to bother most users.

Outdoors, the high brightness does help quite a lot to overpower some of the screen reflections—but the high-gloss panel finish still makes use in the sunlight very difficult. Operation in shaded areas, on the other hand, is mostly comfortable. Viewing angles are excellent as is to be expected.

In the sun
In the sun
In shade
In shade
Viewing angles, Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Viewing angles, Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1

Performance

The first truly major difference between the Latitude 5290 2-in-1 and last year’s 5285 is the processor selection; while last year’s model was equipped with 7th-generation Kaby Lake SoCs, the 5290 offers a full range of 8th-generation processors spanning Core i3 all the way up to i7 options. Today’s review configuration includes a Core i5-8350U SoC, which is probably an intelligent option in light of our previous tests (which have shown time and time again that 8th-generation Core i7 models cannot sustain Turbo frequencies long enough to justify the upgrade). The processor is paired with 8 GB of LPDDR3 RAM and a Toshiba NVMe SSD for what ought to be very fast performance.

A second run of 3DMark 11 actually produced a higher score than our original run—1918—thereby confirming that performance is not reduced while running unplugged.

LatencyMon reported some issues with DPC latencies; disabling Wi-Fi and Bluetooth did not resolve these problems.

CPU-Z CPU
CPU-Z CPU
CPU-Z Caches
CPU-Z Caches
CPU-Z Mainboard
CPU-Z Mainboard
CPU-Z Memory
CPU-Z Memory
GPU-Z
GPU-Z
ComputeMark
ComputeMark
Octane v2
Octane v2
LatencyMon
LatencyMon

Processor

The Intel Core i5-8350U SoC powering our Latitude 5290 is a quad-core processor hailing from the Kaby Lake Refresh generation of chips. Its base frequency of 1.7 GHz can be increased all the way to a max turbo clock rate of 3.6 GHz (provided thermal headroom exists). The TDP of 15 W is extremely low for a quad-core CPU, so provided conditions are favorable, short-term burst performance should be very good for such an efficient machine.

And it is: while single-core performance is roughly equivalent with that of the 5285 2-in-1 (151 points vs. 152 points from the 5285 in Cinebench R15), multi-core performance is vastly improved—some 56% better, with a score of 514. We actually received an even higher score of 569 from the initial run when performing our sustained multi-CPU Cinebench R15 test afterward (probably thanks to the fact that the machine had a longer chance to cool beforehand). The second and third runs dropped to the 520-540 range, runs 3, 4, and 5 fell into the 500 – 510 range, and all subsequent runs were under 500 (with an overall low of 465. This is still admirable performance overall, however, and even the lowest scores are well above the result we received from the 5285 2-in-1 (329). Taking into account the higher score we received from our secondary run of CB R15 multi-CPU, performance is right in line with the category average.

Cinebench R11.5
Cinebench R11.5
Cinebench R15
Cinebench R15
Cinebench R15
CPU Single 64Bit
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
Intel Core i7-7660U
163 Points ∼79% +8%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
Intel Core i7-7600U
152 Points ∼74% +1%
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Intel Core i5-8350U
151 Points ∼73%
Average Intel Core i5-8350U
  (142 - 153, n=5)
150 Points ∼73% -1%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
Intel Core i5-7200U
127 Points ∼62% -16%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
Intel Core i5-7Y54
115 Points ∼56% -24%
Average of class Office
  (20 - 178, n=443)
106 Points ∼51% -30%
Toshiba Portege Z20t-C-121
Intel Core m7-6Y75
99 Points ∼48% -34%
CPU Multi 64Bit
Average Intel Core i5-8350U
  (501 - 625, n=5)
562 Points ∼19% +9%
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Intel Core i5-8350U
514 Points ∼17%
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
Intel Core i7-7660U
410 (min: 335.35, max: 409.45) Points ∼14% -20%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
Intel Core i7-7600U
329 Points ∼11% -36%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
Intel Core i5-7200U
322 Points ∼11% -37%
Average of class Office
  (36 - 736, n=447)
302 Points ∼10% -41%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
Intel Core i5-7Y54
234 Points ∼8% -54%
Toshiba Portege Z20t-C-121
Intel Core m7-6Y75
180 Points ∼6% -65%
Cinebench R11.5
CPU Single 64Bit
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
Intel Core i7-7660U
1.89 Points ∼81% +11%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
Intel Core i7-7600U
1.76 Points ∼75% +3%
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Intel Core i5-8350U
1.71 Points ∼73%
Average Intel Core i5-8350U
  (1.62 - 1.71, n=2)
1.665 Points ∼71% -3%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
Intel Core i5-7200U
1.47 Points ∼63% -14%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
Intel Core i5-7Y54
1.32 Points ∼56% -23%
Average of class Office
  (0.23 - 2.04, n=411)
1.113 Points ∼48% -35%
CPU Multi 64Bit
Average Intel Core i5-8350U
  (5.95 - 7.33, n=2)
6.64 Points ∼28% +12%
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Intel Core i5-8350U
5.95 Points ∼25%
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
Intel Core i7-7660U
4.55 Points ∼19% -24%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
Intel Core i7-7600U
3.62 Points ∼15% -39%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
Intel Core i5-7200U
3.6 Points ∼15% -39%
Average of class Office
  (0.26 - 8.16, n=583)
2.67 Points ∼11% -55%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
Intel Core i5-7Y54
2.57 Points ∼11% -57%
wPrime 2.0x - 1024m
Average of class Office
  (206 - 4269, n=378)
847 s * ∼10% -177%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
Intel Core i5-7Y54
761.49 s * ∼9% -149%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
Intel Core i7-7600U
545.624 s * ∼6% -78%
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
Intel Core i7-7660U
438 s * ∼5% -43%
Average Intel Core i5-8350U
  (306 - 355, n=2)
330 s * ∼4% -8%
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Intel Core i5-8350U
305.731 s * ∼4%
Super Pi Mod 1.5 XS 32M - ---
Average Intel Core i5-8350U
  (10 - 6617, n=8)
1727 Seconds * ∼8% -198%
Average of class Office
  (-1 - 107890, n=5948)
1573 Seconds * ∼7% -171%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
Intel Core i7-7600U
688.22 Seconds * ∼3% -19%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
Intel Core i5-7Y54
669 Seconds * ∼3% -15%
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Intel Core i5-8350U
580 Seconds * ∼3%

* ... smaller is better

Cinebench R11.5 CPU Single 64Bit
1.71 Points
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Multi 64Bit
5.95 Points
Cinebench R11.5 OpenGL 64Bit
41.34 fps
Cinebench R15 CPU Single 64Bit
151 Points
Cinebench R15 CPU Multi 64Bit
514 Points
Cinebench R15 OpenGL 64Bit
48.37 fps
Cinebench R15 Ref. Match 64Bit
97.8 %
Help
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Cinebench R15 CPU Multi 64 Bit

System Performance

PCMark 8 Work and Creative scores top the charts, along with the Microsoft Surface Pro 2017 i7 configuration (which maintains a slight edge). PCMark 8 Home is considerably lower at just 3776, but all results are well above the class average and comparable to other notebooks with the same SoC/GPU.

PCMark 10
PCMark 10
PCMark 8 Home Accelerated
PCMark 8 Home Accelerated
PCMark 8 Creative Accelerated
PCMark 8 Creative Accelerated
PCMark 8 Work Accelerated
PCMark 8 Work Accelerated
PCMark 8
Work Score Accelerated v2
Average Intel Core i5-8350U, Intel UHD Graphics 620
  (4764 - 4906, n=4)
4803 Points ∼74% +1%
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
UHD Graphics 620, 8350U, Toshiba XG5 KXG50ZNV256G
4764 Points ∼73%
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
Iris Plus Graphics 640, 7660U, Samsung PM971 KUS040202M
4431 Points ∼68% -7%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
HD Graphics 615, 7Y54, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
4288 Points ∼66% -10%
Toshiba Portege Z20t-C-121
HD Graphics 515, 6Y75, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN512HCJH
4060 Points ∼62% -15%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
HD Graphics 620, 7200U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
4036 Points ∼62% -15%
Average of class Office
  (1226 - 5200, n=280)
3897 Points ∼60% -18%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
HD Graphics 620, 7600U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
3510 Points ∼54% -26%
Creative Score Accelerated v2
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
Iris Plus Graphics 640, 7660U, Samsung PM971 KUS040202M
5540 Points ∼58% +12%
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
UHD Graphics 620, 8350U, Toshiba XG5 KXG50ZNV256G
4961 Points ∼52%
Average Intel Core i5-8350U, Intel UHD Graphics 620
 
4961 Points ∼52% 0%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
HD Graphics 620, 7600U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
4602 Points ∼48% -7%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
HD Graphics 620, 7200U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
4412 Points ∼46% -11%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
HD Graphics 615, 7Y54, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
3924 Points ∼41% -21%
Toshiba Portege Z20t-C-121
HD Graphics 515, 6Y75, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN512HCJH
3513 Points ∼37% -29%
Average of class Office
  (869 - 5275, n=222)
3306 Points ∼35% -33%
Home Score Accelerated v2
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
HD Graphics 620, 7600U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
4741 Points ∼78% +26%
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
Iris Plus Graphics 640, 7660U, Samsung PM971 KUS040202M
4095 Points ∼67% +8%
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
UHD Graphics 620, 8350U, Toshiba XG5 KXG50ZNV256G
3776 Points ∼62%
Average Intel Core i5-8350U, Intel UHD Graphics 620
  (3600 - 3776, n=4)
3699 Points ∼61% -2%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
HD Graphics 620, 7200U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
3289 Points ∼54% -13%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
HD Graphics 615, 7Y54, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
3092 Points ∼51% -18%
Toshiba Portege Z20t-C-121
HD Graphics 515, 6Y75, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN512HCJH
3068 Points ∼50% -19%
Average of class Office
  (1169 - 4458, n=321)
2973 Points ∼49% -21%
PCMark 8 Home Score Accelerated v2
3776 points
PCMark 8 Creative Score Accelerated v2
4961 points
PCMark 8 Work Score Accelerated v2
4764 points
Help

Storage Devices

The Toshiba XGS 256 GB NVMe SSD can’t compete with the Samsung drives in our comparison field—including the PM961 of the Latitude 5285 2-in-1—but it’s still pretty nimble in real-world use. With sequential read/write scores of 1385.48 MB/s and 302.06 MB/s, it’s hardly mentionable in the same breath as most NVMe SSDs, but it’s quicker than the average SATA drive. Numerous other configuration options exist as well (ranging up to 1 TB, some supporting Opal encryption), but it’s worth recalling that the drive is also fairly easy to replace aftermarket if the user wishes to upgrade later.

Speaking of which, much like the Latitude 7390 2-in-1 which we recently reviewed, the 5290 2-in-1 includes an empty slot for a second M.2 2230 SSD—which makes dual storage configurations a possibility.  That’s an impressive option for a device of this size.

AS SSD
AS SSD
CrystalDiskMark 5.2
CrystalDiskMark 5.2
PCMark 8 Storage
PCMark 8 Storage
The empty internal M.2 2230 slot
The empty internal M.2 2230 slot
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Toshiba XG5 KXG50ZNV256G
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
Samsung PM971 KUS040202M
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
Average Toshiba XG5 KXG50ZNV256G
 
AS SSD
-239%
-1002%
108%
-27%
Copy Game MB/s
317.31
585.49
85%
582
83%
379.9
20%
367 (251 - 742, n=10)
16%
Copy Program MB/s
226.89
286.48
26%
386
70%
198.18
-13%
230 (168 - 325, n=10)
1%
Copy ISO MB/s
512.19
1145.66
124%
1036
102%
790.63
54%
545 (319 - 1146, n=10)
6%
Score Total
1469
2760
88%
1774
21%
4653
217%
1424 (815 - 2437, n=11)
-3%
Score Write
544
150
-72%
52
-90%
879
62%
502 (71 - 1135, n=11)
-8%
Score Read
642
1768
175%
1164
81%
2545
296%
649 (531 - 894, n=11)
1%
Access Time Write *
0.053
2.08
-3825%
7.6
-14240%
0.027
49%
0.2422 (0.038 - 2.15, n=11)
-357%
Access Time Read *
0.082
0.06
27%
0.04
51%
0.041
50%
0.1298 (0.063 - 0.321, n=11)
-58%
4K-64 Write
411.22
126.09
-69%
34
-92%
657.04
60%
370 (52.3 - 937, n=11)
-10%
4K-64 Read
472.74
1607.49
240%
1015
115%
2279.57
382%
450 (337 - 657, n=11)
-5%
4K Write
102.69
1.23
-99%
0.2
-100%
132.2
29%
92.4 (1.94 - 120, n=11)
-10%
4K Read
30.97
27.6
-11%
41
32%
45.24
46%
28 (11.9 - 34.1, n=11)
-10%
Seq Write
302.06
223.08
-26%
171
-43%
897.45
197%
397 (166 - 907, n=11)
31%
Seq Read
1385.48
1328.03
-4%
1070
-23%
2197.21
59%
1712 (1277 - 2392, n=11)
24%

* ... smaller is better

Toshiba XG5 KXG50ZNV256G
CDM 5/6 Read Seq Q32T1: 1779 MB/s
CDM 5/6 Write Seq Q32T1: 358.1 MB/s
CDM 5/6 Read 4K Q32T1: 387 MB/s
CDM 5/6 Write 4K Q32T1: 353.6 MB/s
CDM 5 Read Seq: 1463 MB/s
CDM 5 Write Seq: 359.3 MB/s
CDM 5/6 Read 4K: 32.66 MB/s
CDM 5/6 Write 4K: 121.7 MB/s

GPU Performance

GPU performance has only slightly improved over last year’s model in most cases with premiums ranging from 5% to 16% faster overall. Meanwhile, the Surface Pro 2017 i7 model, equipped with Intel Iris Plus Graphics 640, is a clear winner here by around 20%. The Latitude 5290 still manages respectable performance, however, and it’s above the average for the Intel UHD Graphics 620.

3DMark Fire Strike
3DMark Fire Strike
3DMark Fire Strike Extreme
3DMark Fire Strike Extreme
3DMark Fire Strike Ultra
3DMark Fire Strike Ultra
3DMark Ice Storm
3DMark Ice Storm
3DMark Ice Storm Extreme
3DMark Ice Storm Extreme
3DMark Ice Storm Ultra
3DMark Ice Storm Ultra
3DMark Sky Diver
3DMark Sky Diver
3DMark Time Spy
3DMark Time Spy
3DMark Cloud Gate
3DMark Cloud Gate
3DMark 06
3DMark 06
3DMark 11
1280x720 Performance Combined
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
Intel Iris Plus Graphics 640, 7660U
2184 Points ∼12% +40%
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Intel UHD Graphics 620, 8350U
1556 Points ∼9%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
Intel HD Graphics 620, 7600U
1490 Points ∼8% -4%
Average Intel UHD Graphics 620
  (959 - 1891, n=71)
1464 Points ∼8% -6%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
Intel HD Graphics 620, 7200U
1414 Points ∼8% -9%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
Intel HD Graphics 615, 7Y54
1121 Points ∼6% -28%
Average of class Office
  (169 - 4566, n=565)
1079 Points ∼6% -31%
Toshiba Portege Z20t-C-121
Intel HD Graphics 515, 6Y75
836 Points ∼5% -46%
1280x720 Performance GPU
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
Intel Iris Plus Graphics 640, 7660U
2493 Points ∼5% +50%
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Intel UHD Graphics 620, 8350U
1660 Points ∼3%
Average Intel UHD Graphics 620
  (1366 - 1915, n=71)
1653 Points ∼3% 0%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
Intel HD Graphics 620, 7600U
1589 Points ∼3% -4%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
Intel HD Graphics 620, 7200U
1510 Points ∼3% -9%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
Intel HD Graphics 615, 7Y54
1161 Points ∼2% -30%
Average of class Office
  (185 - 4967, n=566)
1160 Points ∼2% -30%
Toshiba Portege Z20t-C-121
Intel HD Graphics 515, 6Y75
911 Points ∼2% -45%
3DMark
1920x1080 Fire Strike Graphics
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
Intel Iris Plus Graphics 640, 7660U
1418 Points ∼3% +20%
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Intel UHD Graphics 620, 8350U
1185 Points ∼3%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
Intel HD Graphics 620, 7600U
1084 Points ∼3% -9%
Average Intel UHD Graphics 620
  (819 - 1336, n=64)
1061 Points ∼3% -10%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
Intel HD Graphics 620, 7200U
933 Points ∼2% -21%
Average of class Office
  (138 - 4109, n=404)
889 Points ∼2% -25%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
Intel HD Graphics 615, 7Y54
728 Points ∼2% -39%
1280x720 Cloud Gate Standard Graphics
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
Intel Iris Plus Graphics 640, 7660U
11264 Points ∼6% +21%
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Intel UHD Graphics 620, 8350U
9307 Points ∼5%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
Intel HD Graphics 620, 7600U
8850 Points ∼5% -5%
Average Intel UHD Graphics 620
  (6910 - 10493, n=66)
8640 Points ∼5% -7%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
Intel HD Graphics 620, 7200U
7334 Points ∼4% -21%
Average of class Office
  (1208 - 27117, n=448)
6286 Points ∼3% -32%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
Intel HD Graphics 615, 7Y54
6164 Points ∼3% -34%
1920x1080 Ice Storm Extreme Graphics
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
Intel UHD Graphics 620, 8350U
47682 Points ∼7%
Average Intel UHD Graphics 620
  (30939 - 55131, n=24)
44335 Points ∼6% -7%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
Intel HD Graphics 620, 7600U
41229 Points ∼6% -14%
Average of class Office
  (8473 - 86732, n=108)
39047 Points ∼5% -18%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
Intel HD Graphics 620, 7200U
38106 Points ∼5% -20%
3DMark 06 Standard
10387 points
3DMark 11 Performance
1847 points
3DMark Ice Storm Standard Score
66347 points
3DMark Cloud Gate Standard Score
8236 points
3DMark Fire Strike Score
1086 points
3DMark Fire Strike Extreme Score
517 points
3DMark Time Spy Score
398 points
Help
BioShock Infinite
1920x1080 Ultra Preset, DX11 (DDOF) (sort by value)
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
UHD Graphics 620, 8350U, Toshiba XG5 KXG50ZNV256G
9 fps ∼3%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
HD Graphics 620, 7600U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
9 fps ∼3% 0%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
HD Graphics 620, 7200U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
7.5 fps ∼3% -17%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
HD Graphics 615, 7Y54, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
6 fps ∼2% -33%
Toshiba Portege Z20t-C-121
HD Graphics 515, 6Y75, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN512HCJH
4.3 fps ∼2% -52%
Average Intel UHD Graphics 620
  (6.2 - 11, n=58)
8.67 fps ∼3% -4%
Average of class Office
  (5.3 - 39.6, n=183)
9.6 fps ∼4% +7%
1366x768 High Preset (sort by value)
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
UHD Graphics 620, 8350U, Toshiba XG5 KXG50ZNV256G
28 fps ∼9%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
HD Graphics 620, 7600U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
28.6 fps ∼9% +2%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
HD Graphics 620, 7200U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
25.2 fps ∼8% -10%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
HD Graphics 615, 7Y54, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
19 fps ∼6% -32%
Toshiba Portege Z20t-C-121
HD Graphics 515, 6Y75, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN512HCJH
16.2 fps ∼5% -42%
Average Intel UHD Graphics 620
  (15.6 - 34.3, n=62)
25.6 fps ∼8% -9%
Average of class Office
  (12.9 - 107, n=277)
24.6 fps ∼8% -12%
1366x768 Medium Preset (sort by value)
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
UHD Graphics 620, 8350U, Toshiba XG5 KXG50ZNV256G
34 fps ∼10%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
HD Graphics 620, 7600U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
32.8 fps ∼9% -4%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
HD Graphics 620, 7200U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
30.5 fps ∼9% -10%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
HD Graphics 615, 7Y54, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
21 fps ∼6% -38%
Toshiba Portege Z20t-C-121
HD Graphics 515, 6Y75, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN512HCJH
18.8 fps ∼5% -45%
Average Intel UHD Graphics 620
  (19.8 - 40.4, n=62)
30.7 fps ∼9% -10%
Average of class Office
  (9.11 - 119, n=297)
28.3 fps ∼8% -17%
1280x720 Very Low Preset (sort by value)
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
UHD Graphics 620, 8350U, Toshiba XG5 KXG50ZNV256G
60 fps ∼15%
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
HD Graphics 620, 7600U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
56.5 fps ∼14% -6%
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
HD Graphics 620, 7200U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
52.9 fps ∼13% -12%
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
HD Graphics 615, 7Y54, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
42 fps ∼11% -30%
Toshiba Portege Z20t-C-121
HD Graphics 515, 6Y75, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN512HCJH
35.6 fps ∼9% -41%
Average Intel UHD Graphics 620
  (32.6 - 80.3, n=62)
56.1 fps ∼14% -6%
Average of class Office
  (12.2 - 185, n=292)
49.5 fps ∼12% -17%
low med. high ultra
BioShock Infinite (2013) 6034289fps

Stress Test

A critical (and often illuminating) step in our review process is to synthetically stress machines to their limits to see how well they can handle the most torturous of theoretical conditions. Last year’s Latitude 5285 had a penchant for a quick escalation in temperatures shortly after stress was introduced, and as we know from experience, the 8th-generation Kaby Lake Refresh chips are just as prone to rapidly heating up. Some handle it better than others.

CPU stress immediately provoked an climb into the upper 90s C, after which clock rates stabilized at 2.4 GHz and temperatures remained at 82 °C. GPU stress initially opens with clock rates around the max clock rate of 1100 MHz, but after roughly thirty seconds, the frequency has deflated to around 900 MHz on average. Temperatures once again are stable at 82 °C.

Combined system stress immediately brings the system to its knees with CPU throttling to 1.3 GHz and GPU managing just 750 MHz. Temperatures subside to around 75 °C, where they remain permanently for the duration of the test.

CPU stress
CPU stress
GPU stress
GPU stress
Full system stress
Full system stress
CPU Clock (GHz) GPU Clock (MHz) Average CPU Temperature (°C) Average GPU Temperature (°C)
Prime95 Stress 2.4 - 82 -
FurMark Stress - 1100 - 82
Prime95 + FurMark Stress 1.3 750 75 75

Emissions

System Noise

Like its predecessor, the Latitude 5290 2-in-1 is overwhelmingly quiet during normal operation. While idling and even under moderate load, the device is actually entirely silent—the fan doesn’t even run. Only after stressed for longer periods of time does it finally break the silence, and at this point the fan does become quite a bit louder—at 41.6 dB(A)—than what we measured during our time with the 5285. Still, it’s rather uncommon and not all that obtrusive.

Noise Level

Idle
28.5 / 28.5 / 28.5 dB(A)
Load
28.5 / 41.6 dB(A)
  red to green bar
 
 
30 dB
silent
40 dB(A)
audible
50 dB(A)
loud
 
min: dark, med: mid, max: light   BK Precision 732A (15 cm distance)   environment noise: 28.5 dB(A)
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
UHD Graphics 620, 8350U, Toshiba XG5 KXG50ZNV256G
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
HD Graphics 620, 7600U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
Iris Plus Graphics 640, 7660U, Samsung PM971 KUS040202M
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
HD Graphics 620, 7200U, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP
Noise
3%
-3%
-0%
off / environment *
28.5
28.2
1%
29.6
-4%
29.5
-4%
Idle Minimum *
28.5
28.2
1%
29.6
-4%
29.5
-4%
Idle Average *
28.5
28.2
1%
29.6
-4%
29.5
-4%
Idle Maximum *
28.5
28.2
1%
29.6
-4%
29.5
-4%
Load Average *
28.5
30.4
-7%
33.4
-17%
30.6
-7%
Load Maximum *
41.6
34
18%
34.1
18%
32.5
22%
Witcher 3 ultra *
33.4

* ... smaller is better

Temperature

The internal fan rarely even engages during normal operation
The internal fan rarely even engages during normal operation

The Latitude 5285 2-in-1 was already a hot device under load, so (after what we’ve seen so far) it’s unreasonable to expect the 5290 to behave much differently. In fact, objectively speaking, it actually doesn’t run any hotter overall than last year’s model—but the heat is instead more concentrated in a few specific regions. The rear center of the machine, for instance, has warmed from 38 °C to 44.4 °C, and the underside has gone from 48.6 °C to 52 °C. Depending on how the device is being held, this might actually serve as an improvement, since some of the heat from the edges of the tablet where the hands would normally rest has migrated toward the center quadrants instead.

Max. Load
 34.4 °C44.4 °C30.6 °C 
 32.4 °C33.8 °C25.2 °C 
 29 °C28.8 °C27.4 °C 
Maximum: 44.4 °C
Average: 31.8 °C
28.6 °C52 °C47 °C
29.8 °C44.2 °C42.6 °C
30 °C33.8 °C35.6 °C
Maximum: 52 °C
Average: 38.2 °C
Power Supply (max.)  32 °C | Room Temperature 20.2 °C | Fluke 62 Mini IR Thermometer
Front of tablet, idling
Front of tablet, idling
Rear of tablet, idling
Rear of tablet, idling
Front of tablet, max load
Front of tablet, max load
Rear of tablet, max load
Rear of tablet, max load

Speakers

The internal speakers aren't bad for their size
The internal speakers aren't bad for their size

Virtually nothing’s changed with regard to the Latitude 5290’s speakers, which are still pretty good for a tablet/convertible, but which (predictably) lack bass. Pumping up the MaxxBass dial within the included Waves MaxxAudio Pro software (which is actually somewhat useful) does tangibly improve the situation at lower volumes, but when at higher volumes it can result in some distortion. Headphones are therefore recommended for extended media consumption.

Speaker output
Speaker output
dB(A) 0102030405060708090Deep BassMiddle BassHigh BassLower RangeMidsHigher MidsLower HighsMid HighsUpper HighsSuper Highs2034.736.534.7253433.7343134.633.234.64034.333.734.35031.931.631.96331.131.531.18032.43032.410035.829.735.812535.728.535.716047.127.947.120049.526.949.525050.426.850.431551.126.151.140055.124.755.150061.624.761.663063.324.163.380062.623.862.610006623.466125066.523.466.5160063.522.963.5200057.422.757.4250054.422.354.4315058.322.358.3400064.422.364.4500065.522.265.5630065.42265.4800062.522.262.51000061.122.261.11250057.422.257.41600060.522.460.5SPL75.135.175.1N362.436median 60.5Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1median 23.4median 60.5Delta6.31.76.3292728.527.526.725.124.525.626.22622.723.822.225.121.723.520.22419.122.918.325.516.63116.338.716.342.115.840.215.243.915.751.116.25216.351.517.350.617.952.11854.91862.918.266.418.3621855.217.848.817.443.716.945.416.449.129.5711.221.3median 17.4HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EAmedian 48.817hearing rangehide median Pink Noise
Frequency diagram (checkboxes can be checked and unchecked to compare devices)
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1 audio analysis

(±) | speaker loudness is average but good (75.14 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(-) | nearly no bass - on average 15.5% lower than median
(±) | linearity of bass is average (8.5% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(+) | balanced mids - only 3.6% away from median
(±) | linearity of mids is average (8.7% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(+) | balanced highs - only 3.5% away from median
(±) | linearity of highs is average (7.1% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(±) | linearity of overall sound is average (17.6% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 29% of all tested devices in this class were better, 11% similar, 60% worse
» The best had a delta of 8%, average was 21%, worst was 51%
Compared to all devices tested
» 30% of all tested devices were better, 6% similar, 64% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA audio analysis

(-) | not very loud speakers (71 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(-) | nearly no bass - on average 21.3% lower than median
(±) | linearity of bass is average (10% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(+) | balanced mids - only 4.2% away from median
(±) | linearity of mids is average (7.9% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(±) | higher highs - on average 8.9% higher than median
(-) | highs are not linear (16.8% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(-) | overall sound is not linear (31.3% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 88% of all tested devices in this class were better, 2% similar, 11% worse
» The best had a delta of 11%, average was 22%, worst was 53%
Compared to all devices tested
» 90% of all tested devices were better, 3% similar, 7% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

Energy Management

Power Consumption

Power consumption has climbed a bit across the board. While idling, we see results which are between 5% minimum (3 W vs. 2.85 W) and 31% maximum (10 W vs. 6.91 W) higher than those of the Latitude 5285, measurements which are likely to negatively affect battery life in our next section. Load values are also higher, with an average of 37.1 W exceeding the 5285’s 32.88 W by 11% and the max of 38.2 W just a bit hungrier than the 37.41 W we measured from last year’s model.

In our graphs below, please note that the Prime95 stress began at the 20 second mark, whereas the Prime95 + FurMark (max load) test started at 0 seconds.

Power consumption over time, Prime95 CPU stress
Power consumption over time, Prime95 CPU stress
Power consumption over time, Max load
Power consumption over time, Max load
Power Consumption
Off / Standbydarklight 0.29 / 0.57 Watt
Idledarkmidlight 3 / 7.2 / 10 Watt
Load midlight 37.1 / 38.2 Watt
 color bar
Key: min: dark, med: mid, max: light        Metrahit Energy
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
8350U, UHD Graphics 620, Toshiba XG5 KXG50ZNV256G, IPS, 1920x1280, 12.3
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
7600U, HD Graphics 620, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP, IPS, 1920x1280, 12.3
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
7660U, Iris Plus Graphics 640, Samsung PM971 KUS040202M, IPS, 2736x1824, 12.3
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
7200U, HD Graphics 620, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP, IPS, 2716x1824, 12.3
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
7Y54, HD Graphics 615, Samsung PM961 MZVLW256HEHP, IPS, 2160x1440, 12
Toshiba Portege Z20t-C-121
6Y75, HD Graphics 515, Samsung SSD PM871 MZNLN512HCJH, IPS, 1920x1080, 12.5
Power Consumption
11%
-22%
-19%
13%
18%
Idle Minimum *
3
2.85
5%
4.2
-40%
4.1
-37%
5
-67%
4.3
-43%
Idle Average *
7.2
6.76
6%
10.1
-40%
9.2
-28%
6.3
12%
6.1
15%
Idle Maximum *
10
6.91
31%
14
-40%
11.1
-11%
7.8
22%
8.9
11%
Load Average *
37.1
32.88
11%
37.4
-1%
33.8
9%
19.5
47%
16.3
56%
Load Maximum *
38.2
37.41
2%
34
11%
49.2
-29%
19.6
49%
18.6
51%
Witcher 3 ultra *
38.1

* ... smaller is better

Battery Life

During our testing, battery life declined notably since last year’s model. Load runtimes, for starters, were some 25% below those of the Latitude 5285, whereas our Wi-Fi Websurfing test lasted for just 6 hours. We were a bit surprised at the brevity of this latter result, so we reran the test—and came to similar results the second time around.

Six hours still isn’t bad in the grand scheme of things, but it can’t compete with devices like the Microsoft Surface Pro 2017, which lasted over 8 hours in that same test. The Toshiba Portege Z20t, with its massive 72 Wh battery, manages a ridiculous 13 hours here, though that’s arguably a bit overkill as diminishing returns quickly set in at values above around 8 hours for the average user.

Battery Runtime
NBC WiFi Websurfing Battery Test 1.3
5h 00min
Load (maximum brightness)
1h 24min
Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1
8350U, UHD Graphics 620, 42 Wh
Dell Latitude 12 5285 2-in-1
7600U, HD Graphics 620, 42 Wh
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) i7
7660U, Iris Plus Graphics 640, 45 Wh
HP Elite x2 1012 G2-1LV76EA
7200U, HD Graphics 620, 47 Wh
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2
7Y54, HD Graphics 615, 37 Wh
Toshiba Portege Z20t-C-121
6Y75, HD Graphics 515, 72 Wh
Battery Runtime
44%
48%
45%
54%
168%
WiFi v1.3
300
486
62%
489
63%
378
26%
441
47%
804
168%
Load
84
105
25%
112
33%
138
64%
134
60%
Witcher 3 ultra
115

Pros

+ excellent build quality
+ good port selection for its class
+ extremely bright display with good color and contrast
+ robust security options
+ strong CPU performance
+ extremely quiet under normal conditions
+ relatively easy maintenance
+ good input devices
+ decent speakers
+ dual storage possible thanks to empty M.2 2230 SSD/WWAN slot

Cons

- high temperatures under load (surface and internal)
- short standard warranty
- disappointing battery life
- no Thunderbolt
- uncomfortable on the lap
- rather expensive

Verdict

The Latitude 5290 2-in-1
The Latitude 5290 2-in-1

In many ways, the Latitude 5290 2-in-1 is the Surface Pro for the business world. Everything from its understated appearance, relatively convenient maintenance, robust security options, quiet operation, and above-average port selection fits in perfectly with everyday office requirements. Beyond all of that, we still reap the benefits of an extremely sturdy magnesium alloy construction, an uncommonly bright and vivid display, very fast CPU performance, and good keyboard/touchpad (on the separately-sold yet crucial $150 Travel Keyboard accessory). Finally, the optional Dell Active Pen ($60) satisfies the demands of a unique subset of users who require precise Wacom pressure-sensitive active stylus input.

In many ways, the Latitude 5290 2-in-1 is the Surface Pro for the business world; its careful combination of consumer-grade luxury and business-grade sensibility adds up to a unique convertible that meets a very specific set of requirements.

But there are no perfect devices, and the Latitude 5290 does come with its share of notable compromises. Chief among these is battery life, where the Latitude falls sharply behind some recent competitors using Kaby Lake chipset SoCs. It’s also encumbered by high operating temperatures (both surface and internal) under load, though the heat has been redistributed somewhat away from the edges of the device (where the hands would typically rest). The standard warranty is disappointingly short for a device with such a significant price tag. The lack of Thunderbolt will probably irk some users who desire versatile docking solutions. And finally, coming back to the significant price tag we mentioned a moment ago: it’s expensive, at $1,932 for today’s configuration (which, to be fair, does at least include the Travel Keyboard cover and Active Pen).

The top competitors remain last year’s Latitude 5285 (which at least manages far better battery life than the 5290), the Microsoft Surface Pro 2017 (which is very good overall but impossible to upgrade and maintain from a hardware perspective), the HP Elite x2 1012 G2 (which is a very well-rounded device but notably harder to service), and the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2 (which is a good contender but hobbled by the constraints of passive cooling and other annoyances such as PWM). All of these devices feature their own unique sets of strengths and weaknesses, so before deciding on a business convertible, we strongly suggest taking a look at all of them. However, provided that 2-in-1 detachable functionality (and perhaps pressure-sensitive pen input) is an absolute must, there are few devices that manage as strong an overall performance as the Latitude 5290.

Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1 - 03/30/2018 v6
Steve Schardein

Chassis
89 / 98 → 91%
Keyboard
92%
Pointing Device
92%
Connectivity
65 / 80 → 81%
Weight
72 / 20-67 → 100%
Battery
82%
Display
86%
Games Performance
59 / 68 → 87%
Application Performance
87 / 92 → 95%
Temperature
88%
Noise
95%
Audio
54%
Camera
58 / 85 → 68%
Average
78%
89%
Office - Weighted Average

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Dell Latitude 5290 2-in-1 (i5-8350U) Convertible Review
Steve Schardein, 2018-04- 1 (Update: 2018-04-10)
Steve Schardein
Steve Schardein - Review Editor - @othersteve
In grade school, my first computer—an Apple IIGS—started it all for me. Later, in the nineties, if I wasn’t repairing computers for family and friends, I was busy cooking up nifty Visual Basic projects and playing PC games like Command & Conquer and Heroes of Might and Magic. Soon, much of my free time was spent moderating popular gaming forums and covering the industry for various websites. All the while, I never stopped repairing computers, and in 2006, I started a technology consulting company in Louisville, KY—Triple-S Computers—which I have been fortunate to nurture to great success by specializing in not only repairs, but also new machine consultations and purchasing, data recovery, and malware/security. And since 2012, I have proudly contributed many dozens of reviews to Notebookcheck, a site which I have long considered to be the ultimate authority on laptops and related technology. Today, I am truly living my dream: still a child at heart, ever-curious, constantly learning, and thankful to you, our readers.