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The Chuwi Hi10 X feels great to hold, but it's just too slow and unreliable

Chuwi Hi10 X feels great to hold, but it's just too slow and unreliable (Image source: Chuwi)
Chuwi Hi10 X feels great to hold, but it's just too slow and unreliable (Image source: Chuwi)
The passively-cooled 10.1-inch Windows tablet is better fit for indoor use with an external mouse despite its sturdy build and form factor.
Allen Ngo, 🇩🇪

The entry-level Microsoft Surface Go retails for about $400 USD while the higher-end Surface Pro can be over twice that amount. When a Chinese manufacturer offers a similar 10.1-inch Windows tablet for half of the price of even the Surface Go, then you have every right to be suspicious.

We recently checked out the Chuwi Hi10 X Windows 10 tablet detachable that can be found on Amazon for about $230 USD. To our surprise, the tablet is actually well made and rigid due largely to its thick bezels, thick front glass, and metal chassis. The device is quite strong relative to its cheap price for an excellent first impression.

Unfortunately, the Hi10 X begins to fall apart once you actually start using it. The detachable metal keyboard base, as strong as it may be, has an unreliable clickpad that frequently skips and misses user inputs. Meanwhile, the hinges teeter far too much when attempting to adjust the display angle and the display itself is dimmer than on most other tablets. And lastly, overall system performance with the Celeron N4100 is slow with frequent frame skips even if you're simply web browsing, word processing, or moving windows around. The cut corners will be difficult to ignore for users who want to rely on the Chuwi tablet as a long-term Windows device.

See our full review on the Chuwi Hi10 X for more of our thoughts on the detachable.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 05 > The Chuwi Hi10 X feels great to hold, but it's just too slow and unreliable
Allen Ngo, 2020-05- 8 (Update: 2020-05- 6)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.