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Fail | Chuwi GemiBook design flaw shows us what happens when ports are positioned too closely together

Chuwi GemiBook design flaw shows us what happens when ports are positioned too closely together
Chuwi GemiBook design flaw shows us what happens when ports are positioned too closely together
This is how not to design a laptop. If using one port blocks access to an adjacent port, then you know your engineers screwed up somewhere along the process.
Allen Ngo,

Normally on larger laptops, ports are adequately spaced apart since the edges of the chassis are spacious. On thinner and smaller laptops, however, ports tend to be more tightly packed for obvious reasons and at least one manufacturer may have taken this approach a bit too far.

The 13-inch Chuwi GemiBook is a cheap 3:2 laptop with an AC adapter port and USB-C port along the left edge. Meanwhile, its right edge houses the USB-A port and 3.5 mm audio port. As shown by our images below, however, the AC adapter and USB-C ports are positioned so closely together that our USB-C to USB-A adapter won't even fit without impeding the adjacent AC adapter. Unless if you happen to have a skinny adapter cable or regular USB-C cable, then don't expect to be able to utilize both the USB-C port and AC adapter port simultaneously.

The ports are an embarrassing design flaw, but we're not that surprised when considering that this is the same company who falsified product shots to appear thinner than the actual product. Chuwi is aiming for a cheap $300 price point when the GemiBook launches and so we suppose users can expect what they pay for.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 09 > Chuwi GemiBook design flaw shows us what happens when ports are positioned too closely together
Allen Ngo, 2020-09- 5 (Update: 2020-09- 5)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.