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Rumor: AMD Zen 3 architecture could run four threads per core

AMD could seriously ramp up performance with the ability of Zen 3 to process four threads simultaneously per core. (Source: AMD)
AMD could seriously ramp up performance with the ability of Zen 3 to process four threads simultaneously per core. (Source: AMD)
The x86 architecture has been hitting something of a wall lately but AMD looks like it could be set to inject it with a fresh breath of life. According to the rumor mill, the company has finalized the Zen 3 design and it introduces a new SMT4 feature that will allow each core to execute four threads simultaneously.
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AMD looks set to breakthrough the wall that Intel’s ancient x86 architecture has been hitting up against lately with a breakthrough in the development of its new Zen 3 design. According to WCCF Tech, AMD has recently completed the design and it is said to include a new execution feature dubbed SMT4. If accurate, SMT4 will give AMD’s 4000 Series chips the ability to process four threads per core simultaneously. With AMD already challenging Intel for single-core performance and leading in multi-core performance this is great news for customers and bad news for Intel.

AMD is said to have been able to take advantage of underutilized pipelines in the more complex core designs of its new Zen microarchitecture to maximize the use of the available resources. IBM has been able to achieve up to eight threads per core with its designs, but this would be the first time anyone has been able to achieve this with x86-based designs. With AMD also moving to TSMC’s 7nm+ process node for Zen 3, Team Red is looking set to move into a new golden age for the company. If can replicate the approach with its server CPUs as well, Intel will have every reason to be seriously concerned.

Intel is facing pressure at both ends of the performance spectrum. At the lower end, it is facing a threat from ARM-based designs like Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 8cx chipset that area a perfect performance-per-watt fit for ultrabooks and at the upper end of the spectrum AMD is seriously threatening Intel’s dominance in a way that no one could foresee just a few years ago. Part of the reason for this is, of course, Intel’s infamous woes trying to move to the 10nm process but it is only now, since Skylake, that it is starting to make meaningful architectural gains again.

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Sanjiv Sathiah
Sanjiv Sathiah - Senior Tech Writer - 1286 articles published on Notebookcheck since 2017
I have been writing about consumer technology over the past ten years, previously with the former MacNN and Electronista, and now Notebookcheck since 2017. My first computer was an Apple ][c and this sparked a passion for Apple, but also technology in general. In the past decade, I’ve become increasingly platform agnostic and love to get my hands on and explore as much technology as I can get my hand on. Whether it is Windows, Mac, iOS, Android, Linux, Nintendo, Xbox, or PlayStation, each has plenty to offer and has given me great joy exploring them all. I was drawn to writing about tech because I love learning about the latest devices and also sharing whatever insights my experience can bring to the site and its readership.
contact me via: @t3mporarybl1p
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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 09 > Rumor: AMD Zen 3 architecture could run four threads per core
Sanjiv Sathiah, 2019-09-29 (Update: 2019-09-29)