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CES 2020 | MSI GS66 Stealth comes with a ginormous 99.9 WHr battery and a 300 Hz display

MSI GS66 comes with a ginormous 99.9 WHr battery (Source: MSI)
MSI GS66 comes with a ginormous 99.9 WHr battery (Source: MSI)
Who says thin gaming laptops have to sacrifice battery life? MSI has expanded the internal battery capacity for its thinnest gaming laptop to the legal limit. Nonetheless, we'll have to test the battery life ourselves to see how much of a difference the larger battery will actually make.
Allen Ngo,

The super-thin 15.6-inch GS65 is barely two years old and MSI is already refreshing the lineup. The Taiwanese OEM will be showing off the new GS66 this week at CES with several changes both internal and external to make the series even more attractive.

Internally, users will now be able to configure with up to a 300 Hz IPS display whereas the GS65 is limited to "only" 240 Hz. We suspect that the new panel will be the same as the one that Acer has planned for its Predator Triton 500. The Asus ROG Zephyrus S GX701 is already shipping with a 300 Hz display albeit in a 17.3-inch screen size.

The second major internal change relates to the 99.9 Wh battery to be nearly 22 percent larger (82 Wh vs. 99.9 Wh) than the battery in the GS65. This will likely be the upper limit capacity for a long time as OEMs cannot legally install 100+ Wh batteries onto consumer laptops due to FAA regulations.

Externally, the GS66 will have rearranged ports and a different keyboard deck than the outgoing GS65. Expect more details and first-hand pictures of the redesign in the days to come.

Source(s)

MSI

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 01 > MSI GS66 Stealth comes with a ginormous 99.9 WHr battery and a 300 Hz display
Allen Ngo, 2020-01- 6 (Update: 2020-01- 6)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.