Notebookcheck

CES 2020 | Watch out Razer, the MSI Prestige 14 is coming in Hot Pink

Watch out Razer, the MSI Prestige 14 is coming in Hot Pink (Source: MSI)
Watch out Razer, the MSI Prestige 14 is coming in Hot Pink (Source: MSI)
Ever wish your laptop at work could be pinker? MSI has got you covered. One of MSI's best office laptops will be jumping in on the Pink bandwagon similar to the Rose Gold Dell XPS 13 and Quartz Pink Razer Blade series.

Last Valentine's Day, Razer unveiled the Blade Stealth in Pink as the OEM claimed it to be the most requested color option outside of the usual Black and White. The festive color proved to be so popular that Razer subsequently offered the more powerful Blade 15 in Pink six months later. Both the Blade Stealth and Blade 15 can still be ordered online in Black, White, or Pink as of this writing.

Not to be left out in the dark, MSI will now offer its office-centric Prestige 14 laptop in the same Pink color option to grab a piece of that lucrative audience base. Previously, the laptop was only available in Pure White or Carbon Gray.

Other than the palette swap, the Pink Prestige 14 will be physically identical to last year's Prestige 14 down to the Comet Lake-U CPU, GeForce GTX 1650 Max-Q GPU, and 14-inch 4K UHD display. In fact, this system continues to be one of the very 14-inch laptops equipped with both a hexa-core Core U-series CPU and a GTX Max-Q GPU.

MSI isn't ready to disclose exact prices and launch dates for the pink Prestige 14 and we're unsure if the pink option will be available across all SKUs or if it will be limited to one or two configurations. The Pink Razer laptops, for example, are limited to just one or two SKUs.

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 01 > Watch out Razer, the MSI Prestige 14 is coming in Hot Pink
Allen Ngo, 2020-01- 6 (Update: 2020-01- 6)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.