Notebookcheck

HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA Notebook Review

Nino Ricchizzi (translated by Martina Osztovits), 11/02/2016

Generation change. Higher processing performance, finally a Full HD display and a faster storage device turn HP's new notebook into a true office all-rounder. Despite these new features, the laptop has also inherited disadvantageous properties.

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For the original German review, see here.

The fifth generation of the HP 250 series has been designed as budget laptop. The manufacturer charges about 600 Euros (~$665) for our configuration of the office all-rounder. For this price, you'll get a Full HD display, a fast SSD, and an Intel Core i5 processor of the Skylake generation. The predecessor we had under review used Intel's Broadwell architecture and did not have a Full HD display. In addition, it came with a bigger, yet slower HDD. There is another remarkable difference: The dedicated graphics card has been omitted in the new model.

We will compare the new HP 250 G5 to competitors from the same price category. For example, the Acer Extensa 2520 comes with a hard drive and half the RAM capacity for a similar price. In addition, we compare the test model to the Dell Latitude 15 3570 with similar configuration. The last competitor we add to the comparison group is the Lenovo ThinkPad L560, which achieved a "good" rating but is significantly more expensive at just under 900 Euros (~$998).

HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA (250 Series)
Processor
Intel Core i5-6200U, 2 cores (TDP 15 W)
Graphics adapter
Intel HD Graphics 520, Core: 1000 MHz, Memory: 1067 MHz, 20.19.15.4390
Memory
8192 MB 
, DDR4-2134 / PC4-17000
Display
15.6 inch 16:9, 1920 x 1080 pixel 141 PPI, AU Optronics AUO38ED, TN, glossy: no
Mainboard
Intel Skylake-U Premium PCH
Storage
SanDisk Z400s SD8SNAT-256G, 256 GB 
, M.2 format
Soundcard
Intel Skylake-U/Y PCH - High Definition Audio
Connections
2 USB 2.0, 1 USB 3.0 / 3.1 Gen1, 1 VGA, 1 HDMI, 1 Kensington Lock, Audio Connections: audio combo, Card Reader: SD
Networking
Realtek RTL8168/8111 Gigabit-LAN (10/100/1000MBit), Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 3165 (a/b/g/n/ac), Bluetooth 4.2
Optical drive
hp DVDRW DU8A6SH
Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 24 x 384 x 255 ( = 0.94 x 15.12 x 10.04 in)
Battery
41 Wh Lithium-Ion, removeable, 4 cells
Operating System
Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 64 Bit
Camera
Webcam: VGA 640 x 480
Additional features
Speakers: stereo speakers, Keyboard: Chiclet, Keyboard Light: no, 12 Months Warranty
Weight
2.104 kg ( = 74.22 oz / 4.64 pounds), Power Supply: 279 g ( = 9.84 oz / 0.62 pounds)
Price
600 Euro

 

Case

Just as the previous generations, our test model features a full-plastic chassis again. However, you cannot expect it to be any different in this price class. The silver-colored lid looks elegant with its lines texture. The manufacturer also tried to do its best to make the device look high quality when it is opened. The surrounding of the keyboard got a brushed aluminum look. In addition, the build quality appears to be decent apart from minor issues.

However, we did find a few details to complain about: Unfortunately, the lid can be easily depressed. Hence, it does not really appear to be stable. In addition, the display bezel is not perfectly flush with the lid. While the two parts do not visibly touch each other when opening the device, they produce a "cracking noise". In contrast, the hinges are stiff ex-factory. However, it is not possible to open the notebook with one hand.

Overall, the new HP laptop looks quite simple due to the choice of material and with its height of 2.4 cm.

A glance at the underside reveals that only the battery can be removed in two steps. Maintenance is first possible after removing the whole bottom panel. Unfortunately, the laptop does not have maintenance hatches.

The new HP 250 G5 consists of ...
The new HP 250 G5 consists of ...
...a very simple...
...plastic case.
The aluminum look...
...makes the case look nicer.
An all-round device...
...in the low-budget segment.

At a weight of 2.1 kg, the new G5 series is on par with HP's predecessor models. Hence, it is still quite portable. The Lenovo ThinkPad L560 is about 300 g heavier and, at a height of 3.5 cm, it is also 1.1 cm thicker than our test model. The rest of the competitors are about on par in the realms of size and weight.

Size Comparison

Connectivity

Most of the interfaces are located on the left side, towards the front. While this approach makes for easy and convenient access, connected cables can occupy space on the desk in an unfavorable way. The right side only houses the DVD drive and another USB port. In addition, only one of three USB ports is a USB 3.0 port. However, it is not colored in blue as is usually the case but is only labeled "SuperSpeed-USB".

Rear
Rear
Right: SD-card slot, 1x USB 2.0, DVD drive, Kensington lock
Right: SD-card slot, 1x USB 2.0, DVD drive, Kensington lock
Left: power-in, VGA-out, Ethernet port, HDMI-out, 1x USB 3.0, 1x USB 2.0, audio combo
Left: power-in, VGA-out, Ethernet port, HDMI-out, 1x USB 3.0, 1x USB 2.0, audio combo
Front
Front

SD-card reader

In order to analyze the transfer rates of the SD-card reader, we use a Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II reference SD card. While copying .jpg files (about 5 MB each), the HP 250 G5 achieves 23.7 MB/s and performs slightly better than the Acer Extensa 2520-59CD. Overall, the result is quite poor.

SDCardreader Transfer Speed
average JPG Copy Test (av. of 3 runs)
Dell Latitude 15 E5570
 
155.7 MB/s ∼100% +557%
HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA
 
23.7 MB/s ∼15%
Acer Extensa 2520-59CD
 
22.7 MB/s ∼15% -4%
maximum AS SSD Seq Read Test (1GB)
Acer Extensa 2520-59CD
 
27.5 MB/s ∼100%

Communication

Connecting to the Internet is possible in two ways. On the one hand, a wired connection can be established via Gigabit Ethernet. On the other hand, you can connect via the built-in Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 3165 module with a theoretical transfer rate of up to 390 Mbit/s. However, we only measured an average of 89 Mbit/s and 125 Mbit/s at a frequency of 5 GHz as client and as server, respectively, in our Wi-Fi test.

Networking
iperf Server (receive) TCP 1 m
HP ProBook 650 G2 V1A44ET
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8260 (jseb)
234 MBit/s ∼100% +87%
Dell Latitude 14 3470
Atheros AR5BWB222 Wireless Network Adapter
165 MBit/s ∼71% +32%
HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 3165 (jseb)
125 MBit/s ∼53%
Chiligreen Mobilitas SF2600
Realtek RTL8723BE Wireless LAN 802.11n PCI-E NIC
91.6 MBit/s ∼39% -27%
iperf Client (transmit) TCP 1 m
Acer Extensa 2520-59CD
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 3165
274 MBit/s ∼100% +208%
Dell Latitude 14 3470
Atheros AR5BWB222 Wireless Network Adapter
143 MBit/s ∼52% +61%
Chiligreen Mobilitas SF2600
Realtek RTL8723BE Wireless LAN 802.11n PCI-E NIC
99.9 MBit/s ∼36% +12%
HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 3165 (jseb)
89 MBit/s ∼32%
HP ProBook 650 G2 V1A44ET
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8260 (jseb)
79 MBit/s ∼29% -11%

Accessories

Apart from a short quick-start guide, the test model does not include any accessories. In HP's online store we can only find standard accessories such as an external DVD RW drive (52 Euros, ~$57), a computer mouse (27 Euros, ~$29), keyboards, a power adapter (33 Euros, ~$36) and a combination lock for the incorporated Kensington slot.

Maintenance

The manufacturer did not intend that end-users repair the laptop themselves. There are no maintenance hatches nor is it possible to easily and quickly remove the bottom panel. If you want to take a look at the inside, you also have to remove the rubber pads on the underside. Since we wanted to avoid damaging the test model, we refer to a disassembly guide. After removing the base unit, you gain access to all important components. Thanks to an empty slot, it is possible to expand the RAM capacity. Replacing the M.2 SSD is also easy.

Warranty

Unfortunately, the bring-in warranty is restricted to 12 months. If you prefer a 36-month pick up and return service, you have to spend 93 Euros (~$103) more. A three-year on-site service adds another 40 Euros (~$44).

Input Devices

Keyboard

HP's new office laptop comes with a black chiclet keyboard. The keys are grippy thanks to a rough surface. Almost all keys are sufficiently big. The left shift key is slightly shorter than usual. Hence you might need some time to get used to it. The arrow keys for up and down are also slightly smaller.

All keys feature a consistent pressure point and a short, soft travel. The typing experience is slightly spongy because of the short travel. The typing noise remains comfortable when typing gently. Overall, the test model is suitable for prolonged office work. Unfortunately, the HP 250 G5 still lacks a keyboard light.

Touchpad

The almost invisible touchpad is only noticeably due to a small recess in the keyboard unit. The smooth surface precisely reacts to inputs. However, the response time is not perfect. Scrolling in web pages works flawlessly. However, drag'n'drop does not work flawlessly when done with the mouse buttons in front of the touchpad.

The two mouse buttons have a very crisp response. Unfortunately, they are loud. The noise heavily depends on the click position and is disturbing in the long run.

The input devices are adequate.
The input devices are adequate.

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Display

Pixel grid
Pixel grid

In contrast to our HP 250 G4 test model, the new series uses a Full HD display. Apart from the more expensive Lenovo ThinkPad L560, all competitors only feature a resolution of 1366x768 pixels. The average brightness of the matte TN panel is just under 222 cd/m². The ThinkPad competitor performs slightly better in this aspect and reaches 250 cd/m² on average.

Fortunately, screen bleeding or clouding cannot be observed. Another pro is that there is no PWM flickering or flicker.

228
cd/m²
227
cd/m²
217
cd/m²
223
cd/m²
219
cd/m²
207
cd/m²
243
cd/m²
224
cd/m²
209
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
X-Rite i1Pro 2
Maximum: 243 cd/m² Average: 221.9 cd/m² Minimum: 13 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 85 %
Center on Battery: 222 cd/m²
Contrast: 562:1 (Black: 0.39 cd/m²)
ΔE Color 12.67 | 0.4-29.43 Ø6.3
ΔE Greyscale 13.82 | 0.64-98 Ø6.5
55% sRGB (Argyll 3D) 35% AdobeRGB 1998 (Argyll 3D)
Gamma: 2.63
HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA
AU Optronics AUO38ED, , 1920x1080, 15.6
Acer Extensa 2520-59CD
ChiMei N156BGE-E32, , 1366x768, 15.6
Dell Latitude 15-3570
LG Philips LGD04AF / 156WHU, , 1366x768, 15.6
Lenovo ThinkPad L560-20F10026GE
LG LP156WF6-SPK1, , 1920x1080, 15.6
Response Times
-36%
-31%
-13%
Response Time Grey 50% / Grey 80% *
40 (20, 20)
52 (28, 24)
-30%
37 (13, 24)
7%
39.2 (18.8, 20.4)
2%
Response Time Black / White *
22 (6, 16)
31 (14, 17)
-41%
37 (20, 17)
-68%
28 (12.4, 15.6)
-27%
PWM Frequency
1000
Screen
3%
-8%
23%
Brightness middle
219
211
-4%
202
-8%
262
20%
Brightness
222
200
-10%
211
-5%
250
13%
Brightness Distribution
85
83
-2%
88
4%
92
8%
Black Level *
0.39
0.43
-10%
0.62
-59%
0.29
26%
Contrast
562
491
-13%
326
-42%
903
61%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 *
12.67
10.53
17%
12.35
3%
8.49
33%
Colorchecker DeltaE2000 max. *
20.99
17.79
15%
19.9
5%
17.99
14%
Greyscale DeltaE2000 *
13.82
11.85
14%
13.46
3%
8.11
41%
Gamma
2.63 91%
2.25 107%
2.44 98%
2.37 101%
CCT
15633 42%
13758 47%
15217 43%
6300 103%
Color Space (Percent of AdobeRGB 1998)
35
39
11%
39
11%
37.07
6%
Color Space (Percent of sRGB)
55
61
11%
61
11%
57.94
5%
Total Average (Program / Settings)
-17% / -4%
-20% / -12%
5% / 17%

* ... smaller is better

Despite the high black value of 0.39 cd/m², black does not really appear deep in dark video scenes. However, similarly expensive competitors do not perform better. The Dell Latitude 15 3570 has a significantly worse black value of 0.62 cd/m².

As is to be expected for a cheap TN panel, the deviation of colors and grayscales is very high.

We measured a DeltaE deviation of 13.82 for the grayscales, which explains the significant blue tint. The colors do not really perform better with an average deviation of 12.67. The color space, which is important for professional use, is quite poor. The display covers 55% and 35% of sRGB and AdobeRGB, respectively.

CalMAN: Saturation Sweeps
CalMAN: Saturation Sweeps
CalMAN: Color fidelity
CalMAN: Color fidelity
CalMAN: Grayscales
CalMAN: Grayscales
vs. AdobeRGB
vs. AdobeRGB
vs. sRGB
vs. sRGB
Outdoor use is possible when the sky is overcast
Outdoor use is possible when the sky is overcast

Two aspects are important for outdoor use: First of all a matte display is advantageous, which is given in our case. Secondly, a high enough brightness is required. However, this is only true for the HP 250 G5 to an extent. Outdoor use is possible in the shade and without direct sunlight.

Display Response Times

Display response times show how fast the screen is able to change from one color to the next. Slow response times can lead to afterimages and can cause moving objects to appear blurry (ghosting). Gamers of fast-paced 3D titles should pay special attention to fast response times.
       Response Time Black to White
22 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 6 ms rise
↘ 16 ms fall
The screen shows good response rates in our tests, but may be too slow for competitive gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.8 (minimum) to 240 (maximum) ms. » 22 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is better than the average of all tested devices (25.9 ms).
       Response Time 50% Grey to 80% Grey
40 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 20 ms rise
↘ 20 ms fall
The screen shows slow response rates in our tests and will be unsatisfactory for gamers.
In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.9 (minimum) to 636 (maximum) ms. » 43 % of all devices are better.
This means that the measured response time is similar to the average of all tested devices (41.4 ms).

Screen Flickering / PWM (Pulse-Width Modulation)

To dim the screen, some notebooks will simply cycle the backlight on and off in rapid succession - a method called Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) . This cycling frequency should ideally be undetectable to the human eye. If said frequency is too low, users with sensitive eyes may experience strain or headaches or even notice the flickering altogether.
Screen flickering / PWM not detected

In comparison: 54 % of all tested devices do not use PWM to dim the display. If PWM was detected, an average of 8882 (minimum: 43 - maximum: 142900) Hz was measured.

The new 250 G5 series comes with a cheap TN panel. Therefore, colors and brightness look different depending on the viewing angle. The 300-Euro (~$332) more expensive Lenovo ThinkPad L560 delivers better viewing angles thanks to an IPS display.

Viewing angles
Viewing angles

Performance

The LatencyMon check does not reveal problems
The LatencyMon check does not reveal problems

Our HP 250 G5 configuration features components which are sufficient for current office and multimedia requirements: an Intel Core i5 CPU, 8 GB of RAM (single-channel), and a 256 GB SSD. As usual, the manufacturer offers several models from this series. The starting price is cheap at 260 Euros (~$288). However, this model comes with a significantly weaker Intel Pentium N3710 processor, half the RAM capacity, and a 500 GB HDD. Apart from a choice of i3 and i7 processors, different RAM capacities and storage devices, an alternative model sports an AMD Radeon R5 M330 graphics card with 2 GB RAM for 580 Euros (~$643).

Processor

Constant clock rate in Cinebench R15
Constant clock rate in Cinebench R15

An Intel Core i5-6200U with a base clock of 2.3 GHz is used as central processing unit. The two cores can clock at up to 2.7 GHz (one core: max. 2.8 GHz) for a short time thanks to the Turbo Boost technology.

Although all laptops in this comparison group use the same processor, different cooling approaches can have an impact on the performance. We use Cinebench R15 in order to test the performance. Apart from the Acer Extensa 2520-59CD, all devices are close to each other in the multi-core and the single-core tests. As in the other test devices, the HP is able to clock at its maximum of 2.7 GHz throughout the test. Only the Extensa 2520 performs about 10% worse than the rest of the competitors with 261 points (multi-core test).

The HP 250 G5 even delivers its full CPU performance on battery.

See our benchmark table of current notebook processors for more comparisons and benchmarks.

Cinebench R15
CPU Single 64Bit
Lenovo ThinkPad L560-20F10026GE
Intel Core i5-6200U
116 Points ∼56% 0%
Dell Latitude 15-3570
Intel Core i5-6200U
116 Points ∼56% 0%
HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA
Intel Core i5-6200U
116 Points ∼56%
Acer Extensa 2520-59CD
Intel Core i5-6200U
87 Points ∼42% -25%
CPU Multi 64Bit
Lenovo ThinkPad L560-20F10026GE
Intel Core i5-6200U
290 Points ∼10% +1%
Dell Latitude 15-3570
Intel Core i5-6200U
290 Points ∼10% +1%
HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA
Intel Core i5-6200U
288 Points ∼10%
Acer Extensa 2520-59CD
Intel Core i5-6200U
261 Points ∼9% -9%
Cinebench R15 CPU Single 64Bit
116 Points
Cinebench R15 CPU Multi 64Bit
288 Points
Cinebench R15 OpenGL 64Bit
36.66 fps
Cinebench R15 Ref. Match 64Bit
97.8 %
Help

System Performance

PCMark 8 Home
PCMark 8 Home
PCMark 8 Work
PCMark 8 Work
PCMark 8 Creative
PCMark 8 Creative

The combination of responsive SSD and i5 processor is alright. The performance of the test model is always adequate and programs open quickly. In order to increase the performance even further, end-users should consider adding a second RAM module for activating dual-channel mode, which especially increases the graphics performance. Overall, the HP 250 G5 performs well in the system benchmark PCMark 8 and outperforms the Lenovo ThinkPad in all tests by about 14%.

PCMark 8
Work Score Accelerated v2
Dell Latitude 15-3570
HD Graphics 520, 6200U, Samsung CM871 MZNLF128HCHP
4477 Points ∼69% +3%
HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA
HD Graphics 520, 6200U, SanDisk Z400s SD8SNAT-256G
4343 Points ∼67%
Lenovo ThinkPad L560-20F10026GE
HD Graphics 520, 6200U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-21KHST0
3861 Points ∼59% -11%
Home Score Accelerated v2
Dell Latitude 15-3570
HD Graphics 520, 6200U, Samsung CM871 MZNLF128HCHP
3337 Points ∼55% +1%
HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA
HD Graphics 520, 6200U, SanDisk Z400s SD8SNAT-256G
3317 Points ∼54%
Lenovo ThinkPad L560-20F10026GE
HD Graphics 520, 6200U, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-21KHST0
2886 Points ∼47% -13%
Acer Extensa 2520-59CD
HD Graphics 520, 6200U, Toshiba MQ01ABF050
2834 Points ∼47% -15%
PCMark 7 Score
4213 points
PCMark 8 Home Score Accelerated v2
3317 points
PCMark 8 Creative Score Accelerated v2
3605 points
PCMark 8 Work Score Accelerated v2
4343 points
Help

Storage Device

AS SSD benchmark
AS SSD benchmark

As already mentioned briefly, the HP uses a 256 GB SSD in our configuration. The SSD from SanDisk features an M.2 format. In contrast, cheap alternative models with an Intel Pentium N processor use a 500 GB HDD. However, apart from a single exception, the competitors listed here also only come with a magnetic hard drive. Only the Dell Latitude 15 features an SSD. However, even the Latitude 15 cannot quite reach the transfer rates of the HP 250 G5 in CrystalDiskMark. Our HP test model achieves a sequential write rate of 322 MB/s, which is about 190 MB/s higher than the Latitude 15's. The read rates of 508 MB/s are also about 12% better.

HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA
SanDisk Z400s SD8SNAT-256G
Acer Extensa 2520-59CD
Toshiba MQ01ABF050
Dell Latitude 15-3570
Samsung CM871 MZNLF128HCHP
Lenovo ThinkPad L560-20F10026GE
WDC Slim WD10SPCX-21KHST0
CrystalDiskMark 3.0
-90%
-42%
-89%
Write 4k QD32
228.5
0.769
-100%
23.3
-90%
1.036
-100%
Read 4k QD32
141.3
0.675
-100%
93.53
-34%
1.367
-99%
Write 4k
88.01
0.782
-99%
21.31
-76%
1.022
-99%
Read 4k
20.99
0.375
-98%
19.06
-9%
0.488
-98%
Write 512
289.4
38.3
-87%
134.1
-54%
55.33
-81%
Read 512
321.2
33
-90%
308.5
-4%
39.65
-88%
Write Seq
322.1
95.72
-70%
137.7
-57%
111.7
-65%
Read Seq
508.9
104.7
-79%
453.2
-11%
113.6
-78%
SanDisk Z400s SD8SNAT-256G
Sequential Read: 508.9 MB/s
Sequential Write: 322.1 MB/s
512K Read: 321.2 MB/s
512K Write: 289.4 MB/s
4K Read: 20.99 MB/s
4K Write: 88.01 MB/s
4K QD32 Read: 141.3 MB/s
4K QD32 Write: 228.5 MB/s

Graphics Card

Graphics is done by an integrated Intel HD Graphics 520. The processor graphics card belongs to the Skylake generation and clocks at up to 1050 MHz (Boost). According to our measurements, our model achieves a maximum of 1000 MHz. As already mentioned above, our contender uses single-channel RAM. As we wanted to know whether dual-channel mode pays off in 3DMark 11, we have added the Acer TravelMate P658-M-537B to our comparison. Our test model achieves a good GPU score in 3DMark 11 with 1257 points. The graphics performance does not fall on battery. Compared to the already mentioned TravelMate P658, the HP 250 G5 only performs worse by 90 points.

Those who buy an HP 250 G5 variant with Radeon R5 M330 will get a higher GPU performance. For this comparison, we have added the Lenovo IdeaPad 300-17ISK, which achieves 1637 points in 3DMark 11.

See our benchmark table of current notebook graphics cards for more benchmarks performed on other graphics units.

3DMark 11 - 1280x720 Performance GPU
Lenovo IdeaPad 300-17ISK 80QH001EGE
AMD Radeon R5 M330, Intel Core i5-6200U
1518 Points ∼3% +21%
Acer TravelMate P658-M-537B
Intel HD Graphics 520, Intel Core i5-6200U
1347 Points ∼3% +7%
Dell Latitude 15-3570
Intel HD Graphics 520, Intel Core i5-6200U
1273 Points ∼2% +1%
HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA
Intel HD Graphics 520, Intel Core i5-6200U
1257 Points ∼2%
Lenovo ThinkPad L560-20F10026GE
Intel HD Graphics 520, Intel Core i5-6200U
1225 Points ∼2% -3%
Acer Extensa 2520-59CD
Intel HD Graphics 520, Intel Core i5-6200U
1162 Points ∼2% -8%
3DMark
1920x1080 Fire Strike Graphics
Lenovo IdeaPad 300-17ISK 80QH001EGE
AMD Radeon R5 M330, Intel Core i5-6200U
874 Points ∼2%
Lenovo ThinkPad L560-20F10026GE
Intel HD Graphics 520, Intel Core i5-6200U
652 Points ∼2%
1280x720 Cloud Gate Standard Graphics
Acer TravelMate P658-M-537B
Intel HD Graphics 520, Intel Core i5-6200U
6963 Points ∼4% +10%
HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA
Intel HD Graphics 520, Intel Core i5-6200U
6314 Points ∼3%
Lenovo ThinkPad L560-20F10026GE
Intel HD Graphics 520, Intel Core i5-6200U
6126 Points ∼3% -3%
Dell Latitude 15-3570
Intel HD Graphics 520, Intel Core i5-6200U
5909 Points ∼3% -6%
Lenovo IdeaPad 300-17ISK 80QH001EGE
AMD Radeon R5 M330, Intel Core i5-6200U
4897 Points ∼3% -22%
3DMark 11 Performance
1393 points
3DMark Ice Storm Standard Score
45395 points
3DMark Cloud Gate Standard Score
5123 points
Help

Gaming Performance

Those who want to restrict themselves to classic games will get along with the integrated GPU. Newer games from the last few years often cannot be played at all or only with minimum settings. If the frame rate only falls slightly below the 30 fps limit for smooth gaming, you might want to consider adding a second RAM module for activating dual-channel mode.

See our article gaming performance of current notebook graphics cards to find out which games can still be played smoothly with the used processor graphics unit.

BioShock Infinite - 1280x720 Very Low Preset
Lenovo IdeaPad 300-17ISK 80QH001EGE
43.2 fps ∼100% +1%
HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA
42.6 fps ∼99%
Dell Latitude 15-3570
36.5 fps ∼84% -14%
Lenovo ThinkPad L560-20F10026GE
35.9 (min: 20.77, max: 69.81) fps ∼83% -16%
Acer Extensa 2520-59CD
30 fps ∼69% -30%

Legend

 
HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA Intel Core i5-6200U, Intel HD Graphics 520, SanDisk Z400s SD8SNAT-256G
 
Dell Latitude 15-3570 Intel Core i5-6200U, Intel HD Graphics 520, Samsung CM871 MZNLF128HCHP
 
Lenovo ThinkPad L560-20F10026GE Intel Core i5-6200U, Intel HD Graphics 520, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-21KHST0
 
Acer Extensa 2520-59CD Intel Core i5-6200U, Intel HD Graphics 520, Toshiba MQ01ABF050
 
Lenovo IdeaPad 300-17ISK 80QH001EGE Intel Core i5-6200U, AMD Radeon R5 M330, Toshiba MQ01ABD100
low med. high ultra
BioShock Infinite (2013) 42.65.5fps
Battlefield 4 (2013) 30.62214.54.8fps
Rise of the Tomb Raider (2016) 65.734.119.79.3fps

Emissions

System Noise

Fan behavior
Fan behavior

Already at the first contact with the notebook, the permanently running fan becomes evident. If you listen closer, you can hear a quiet, yet quite high-frequency noise. We measured a noise level of 34.5 dB(A). At least it is possible to disable the option "fan always on" in the BIOS. Although the fan speeds up under load, the maximum noise level is not overly loud at 39 dB(A). Only the high frequency noise is disturbing in quiet environments. For example, Dell's Latitude 3570 works significantly quieter in both scenarios.

Noise Level

Idle
34.5 / 34.5 / 34.5 dB(A)
DVD
37.3 / dB(A)
Load
39 / 38.3 dB(A)
  red to green bar
 
 
30 dB
silent
40 dB(A)
audible
50 dB(A)
loud
 
min: dark, med: mid, max: light   Audix TM1, Arta (15 cm distance)   environment noise: 31.6 dB(A)

Temperature

Stress test
Stress test
The underside gets only slightly warmer
The underside gets only slightly warmer

The HP achieves a high score in terms of temperature increase of the case. It neither gets uncomfortably hot when idling nor under load. The Dell Latitude 3570 is a negative example, which reaches temperatures of up to 47 °C on the underside. Only the small power adapter of our test model gets warmer and can reach up to 44 °C under load. Finally, we check the temperatures inside and whether the CPU has to throttle in order to keep the temperatures low. For this, we stress the laptop with the programs FurMark and Prime95. We are pleased: Even after one hour, the processor clocks almost consistently at 2500 MHz. The processor temperature levels off at about 64 °C.

 21.9 °C
71 F
22.7 °C
73 F
20.2 °C
68 F
 
 21.5 °C
71 F
22.9 °C
73 F
20.1 °C
68 F
 
 21.6 °C
71 F
21.1 °C
70 F
22.1 °C
72 F
 
Maximum: 22.9 °C = 73 F
Average: 21.6 °C = 71 F
21.2 °C
70 F
22.4 °C
72 F
22.6 °C
73 F
20.6 °C
69 F
22 °C
72 F
22.1 °C
72 F
20.5 °C
69 F
21.1 °C
70 F
22.2 °C
72 F
Maximum: 22.6 °C = 73 F
Average: 21.6 °C = 71 F
Power Supply (max.)  32.6 °C = 91 F | Room Temperature 20.5 °C = 69 F | FIRT 550-Pocket
Underside (load)
Underside (load)
Underside (idle)
Underside (idle)
Keyboard side (load)
Keyboard side (load)
Keyboard side (idle)
Keyboard side (idle)

Speakers

As can be seen in the diagram below, the sound output is not too bad. The curve is almost linear from the mid-tones. As usual, a strong bass is missing. However, we cannot confirm the apparently good behavior when playing music files. At least, voices sound clear. In addition, the volume is only sufficient for short YouTube sessions.

dB(A) 0102030405060708090Deep BassMiddle BassHigh BassLower RangeMidsHigher MidsLower HighsMid HighsUpper HighsSuper Highs2040.938.140.92542.335.842.33140.134.840.14040.233.640.25042.132.942.16343.635.243.68043.630.743.61004528.94512545.627.845.616047.426.547.42005027.65025054.224.954.231559.72559.740060.12360.150063.322.663.363070.121.470.18007121.171100062.920.262.9125062.619.962.6160065.419.565.4200069.719.269.7250068.919.668.9315073.819.373.840007619.376500071.319.371.3630073.219.373.2800071.519.271.51000070.418.970.41250069.118.669.11600068.718.968.7SPL83.132.483.1N55.81.855.8median 68.7HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EAmedian 19.9median 68.7Delta6.42.86.435.335.132.931.831.83236.535.132.428.93328.936.328.848.32761.52752.924.860.92462.822.763.32269.521.267.82174.82075.919.472.718.97117.770.117.86917.671.817.668.117.671.417.673.717.670.417.571.617.671.617.669.617.459.717.583.630.662.51.5median 69.6Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHzmedian 17.84.62.4hearing rangehide median Pink Noise
HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA audio analysis

(±) | speaker loudness is average but good (75 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(-) | nearly no bass - on average 18.3% lower than median
(+) | bass is linear (5.5% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(+) | balanced mids - only 4.2% away from median
(+) | mids are linear (6.9% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(+) | balanced highs - only 3.5% away from median
(+) | highs are linear (5.1% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(±) | linearity of overall sound is average (15.1% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 15% of all tested devices in this class were better, 4% similar, 81% worse
» The best had a delta of 8%, average was 20%, worst was 51%
Compared to all devices tested
» 16% of all tested devices were better, 4% similar, 79% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

Apple MacBook 12 (Early 2016) 1.1 GHz audio analysis

(+) | speakers can play relatively loud (83.6 dB)
Bass 100 - 315 Hz
(±) | reduced bass - on average 11.3% lower than median
(±) | linearity of bass is average (14.2% delta to prev. frequency)
Mids 400 - 2000 Hz
(+) | balanced mids - only 2.4% away from median
(+) | mids are linear (5.5% delta to prev. frequency)
Highs 2 - 16 kHz
(+) | balanced highs - only 2% away from median
(+) | highs are linear (4.5% delta to prev. frequency)
Overall 100 - 16.000 Hz
(+) | overall sound is linear (9.3% difference to median)
Compared to same class
» 2% of all tested devices in this class were better, 1% similar, 97% worse
» The best had a delta of 8%, average was 19%, worst was 47%
Compared to all devices tested
» 2% of all tested devices were better, 0% similar, 98% worse
» The best had a delta of 3%, average was 21%, worst was 53%

Frequency Comparison (Checkbox selectable!)

Energy Management

Power Consumption

When idling, the test model just requires between 3.6 and 6.4 W, which is lower than the power consumption of the other devices in our comparison group on average. Moreover, the HP 250 G5 is not especially power-hungry regarding maximum power consumption with up to 28 W.

Power Consumption
Off / Standbydarklight 0.28 / 0.46 Watt
Idledarkmidlight 3.6 / 6 / 6.4 Watt
Load midlight 26 / 28.1 Watt
 color bar
Key: min: dark, med: mid, max: light        Metrahit Energy
HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA
6200U, HD Graphics 520, SanDisk Z400s SD8SNAT-256G, TN, 1920x1080, 15.6
Acer Extensa 2520-59CD
6200U, HD Graphics 520, Toshiba MQ01ABF050, TN LED, 1366x768, 15.6
Dell Latitude 15-3570
6200U, HD Graphics 520, Samsung CM871 MZNLF128HCHP, TN LED, 1366x768, 15.6
Lenovo ThinkPad L560-20F10026GE
6200U, HD Graphics 520, WDC Slim WD10SPCX-21KHST0, AH-IPS, 1920x1080, 15.6
Power Consumption
-57%
-14%
-26%
Idle Minimum *
3.6
5.8
-61%
4.9
-36%
5
-39%
Idle Average *
6
12.6
-110%
7.2
-20%
7.9
-32%
Idle Maximum *
6.4
12.8
-100%
7.5
-17%
8.6
-34%
Load Average *
26
27.6
-6%
25.4
2%
27.5
-6%
Load Maximum *
28.1
30
-7%
28
-0%
33.7
-20%

* ... smaller is better

Battery Life

The 4-cell lithium-ion battery in our test model features a capacity of 41 Wh and is supposed to last up to 6 hours. The cheaper models of the 250 G5 series only come with a 31 Wh battery with three cells.

We want to determine the battery life and check the manufacturer's claim in a few test scenarios.

In order to determine the maximum battery life, we select the Windows power-saving profile, set the brightness to its minimum and start a script which simulates reading. The test model switches to sleep mode after 10.5 hours and exceeds the manufacturer's claim.

Web-surfing is a realistic scenario. For this test, we set the brightness to about 150 cd/m² and simulate web surfing. The HP 250 G5 shuts down after 5 h and 47 min, which is consistent with the manufacturer's claim. If the battery life is not sufficient for you, you might want to consider the Dell Latitude 3570, which lasts as much as 3 hours longer.

Finally, we analyze the expected minimum battery life with Battery Eater's Classic test. At maximum brightness and with the Windows profile "Maximum Performance", HP's new laptop shuts down after just 1 h and 49 min. The Latitude 3570 exceeds our test model by 50 min.

Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
10h 34min
NBC WiFi Websurfing Battery Test 1.3
5h 47min
Big Buck Bunny H.264 1080p
5h 13min
Load (maximum brightness)
1h 49min
HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA
6200U, HD Graphics 520, 41 Wh
Acer Extensa 2520-59CD
6200U, HD Graphics 520, 37 Wh
Dell Latitude 15-3570
6200U, HD Graphics 520, 65 Wh
Lenovo ThinkPad L560-20F10026GE
6200U, HD Graphics 520, 48 Wh
Battery Runtime
-9%
54%
4%
Reader / Idle
634
1024
62%
698
10%
H.264
313
277
-12%
WiFi v1.3
347
315
-9%
542
56%
406
17%
Load
109
157
44%
109
0%

Pros

+ matte display
+ system performance
+ Full HD display
+ temperature

Cons

- bluish display
- fan is always on
- fan noise
- difficult maintenance
- no dual-channel RAM out-of-the-box

Verdict

In review: HP 250 G5. Test model provided by Notebooksbilliger.de
In review: HP 250 G5. Test model provided by Notebooksbilliger.de

HP presents a low-budget all-rounder for everyday office tasks, for the university, or as an entry-level business notebook. Thanks to many possible configurations, you can find a suitable product almost regardless of your budget. What can customers expect in this price category? The case features a simple design and is almost completely made from plastic. At least, the manufacturer tries to give it a higher-end appearance with an aluminum look. The input devices are sufficient for usual office work and fall into line with the standard in this price category. We would wish for a longer key travel and a less spongy typing experience in the next generation. In addition, the keys of the touchpad could be quieter.

The up-to-date Full HD display is new in this generation. Unfortunately, it shows a remarkably blue tint and its brightness could be higher. We can praise the performance of the HP 250 G5. An SSD and a Core i5 processor make working a joyful experience. Only one thing is unfortunate: Upgrading is unfortunately a bit difficult. Another pro is the low temperature increase. In return, the fan control should be improved.

Overall HP delivers a balanced bundle in its fifth generation.

Those who cannot live with the battery life might want to read our Dell Latitude 3570 review. A high-quality IPS panel might be a reason to buy the Lenovo ThinkPad L560.

HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA - 10/26/2016 v5.1
Nino Ricchizzi

Chassis
73 / 98 → 75%
Keyboard
71%
Pointing Device
75%
Connectivity
46 / 80 → 57%
Weight
62 / 20-67 → 89%
Battery
84%
Display
75%
Games Performance
66 / 68 → 97%
Application Performance
81 / 92 → 88%
Temperature
97%
Noise
70%
Audio
53%
Camera
50 / 85 → 59%
Average
69%
75%
Office - Weighted Average

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > HP 250 G5 SP X0N33EA Notebook Review
Nino Ricchizzi, 2016-11- 2 (Update: 2018-05-15)