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Asus B9440 thin-and-light notebook now available for 1200 Euros

Asus B9440 thin-and-light notebook now available for 1200 Euros
Asus B9440 thin-and-light notebook now available for 1200 Euros
The B9440 is unlike existing Zenbook Ultrabooks as it caters to the business crowd with an even sleeker and lighter design philosophy while still integrating TPM and a fingerprint reader.

Unveiled at CES 2017, the AsusPro B9440 is a 14-inch FHD notebook in a 13-inch form factor due to its extremely narrow 5.4 mm-thick bezels. The model makes use of a robust all-metal magnesium alloy chassis and a super-thin design for a final weight of just 1 kg. In order to reduce flexing as much as possible from the already thin lid, Asus is promising "Antiflex" technology that should hopefully result in a more rigid frame.

Core specifications include:

Another feature is its ergonomic backlit keyboard that tilts when the display is opened similar to the existing HP Envy series and the upcoming HP Pavilion refresh. Since this is a business laptop, a fingerprint sensor is included with optional TPM. The manufacturer is promising a "pure" version of Windows 10 Home without the pre-installed Asus bloatware normally found on the consumer-oriented Zenbook series.

The B9440 is now available at around 1200 Euros through online resellers.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 04 > Asus B9440 thin-and-light notebook now available for 1200 Euros
Allen Ngo, 2017-04-26 (Update: 2017-04-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.