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Zotac unveils ZBox CI327 mini PC with passively cooled Celeron N3450

Zotac unveils ZBox CI327 mini PC with passively cooled Celeron N3450
Zotac unveils ZBox CI327 mini PC with passively cooled Celeron N3450
The CI327 is destined to be a silent low-power media center for streaming and browsing with its wide range of video outputs and USB ports.

The Zotac ZBox series consists of a wide range of mini PCs from passively cooled solutions all the way up to hulking VR Ready Magnus desktop replacements. The latest entry is of the former variety with its super small dimensions and low-power 6 W Intel processor that allows for a fanless design.

Core specifications for the ZBox CI327 Nano include:

  • 2.2 GHz Celeron N3450 processor
  • Integrated HD Graphics 500
  • Up to 16 GB DDR3L RAM (2x SODIMM)
  • 2x HDMI 2.0, 1x DisplayPort 1.2 (up to 4096 x 2160 @ 60 Hz)
  • Integrated SD reader, 4x USB 3.0, 1x USB Type-C, VGA, 2x Gigabit Ethernet
  • 2.5-inch SATA III SSD or HDD
  • WLAN 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.2
  • 128 x 127 x 57 mm

The miniature design incorporates ventilation and air holes on nearly every side to ensure safe operation even on the most demanding of tasks.

Zotac has provided no other information regarding the launch price or availability of the ZBox CI327, but at least one retailer is already listing the model as a barebones (no RAM, no OS, no storage) offering for $200 USD.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 04 > Zotac unveils ZBox CI327 mini PC with passively cooled Celeron N3450
Allen Ngo, 2017-04-26 (Update: 2018-05-15)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.