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CES 2017 | Endless intros two Linux-driven mini desktop PCs

Endless Mini and Endless One mini desktop PCs with Linux-based operating system
Endless Mini and Endless One
These two compact desktop computers start at just $129 USD (the ARM-driven Mission Mini) and are Endless Computers' first products designed specifically for the US market. Pre-orders begin next week.

Endless Computers has been around for a while, but they only made low-end Linux-based computers for use in emerging markets. Now, the time has finally arrived for the company's first products tailored specifically for the US market. Endless Mission Mini and Mission One have been both unveiled at CES and feature a compact, yet attractive design, costing less than most mid-range smartphones.

These are the highlights of the two mini desktop PCs mentioned above:

  • Mission Mini: quad-core AMLogic S805 with Mali-450 graphics, 2 GB RAM, 64 GB SSD storage, 3XUSB 2.0, HDMI/RCA
  • Mission One: dual-core Intel Celeron N2807 with Intel HD graphics, 4 GB RAM, 500 GB hard drive, 2XUSB 2.0, 1XUSB 3.0, HDMI, VGA

Both feature WiFi 802.11 b/g/, Bluetooth 4.0 and RJ45 Gigabit LAN connectivity, and come loaded with Endless' Linux-based operating system simply known as Endless OS.

The Endless Mission Mini has a price tag of $129 USD, while the Mission One can be acquired for $249 USD. Pre-orders start on January 1.

Endless Mission One Linux mini desktop PC with Intel Celeron N2807 processor
Endless Mission One Linux mini desktop PC
Endless Mission Mini Linux mini desktop PC with ARM-based processor
Endless Mission Mini Linux mini desktop PC
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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 01 > Endless intros two Linux-driven mini desktop PCs
Codrut Nistor, 2017-01- 9 (Update: 2017-01- 9)
Codrut Nistor
Codrut Nistor - News Editor
Although I have been writing about new software and hardware for almost a decade, I consider myself to be old school. I always enjoy listening to music on CD or tape instead of digital files and I will not even get into the touchscreen vs physical keys debate. However, I also enjoy new technology, as I now have the chance to take a look at the future every day. I joined the Notebookcheck crew back in 2013 and I have no plans to leave the ship anytime soon.