Notebookcheck

Wearables market up 172 percent thanks to fitness trackers and the Apple Watch

Wearables market up 172 percent thanks to fitness trackers and the Apple Watch
Wearables market up 172 percent thanks to fitness trackers and the Apple Watch
The global wearables market saw a significant upswing to more than 78 million units shipped as of 2015.

Wearables are booming according to the latest reports from market research firm IDC. As of Q4 2015, the market has grown nearly 127 percent from 12.1 million units a year earlier to 27.4 million units. As for the full 2015 calendar year, sales have been even higher from 28.8 million units in 2014 to 78.1 million units to represent a sales jump of almost 172 percent.

Apparently, public fears about security, vulnerabilities, and surveillance due to smart devices have not put a dent on the rise of the wearables market. Suppliers are continuing to push new form factors, designs, and features to new products. Consumers are also opening up to the idea of clothing, footwear, and glasses incorporating such features according to IDC.

The top five most important wearables brands as of 2015 are Fitbit, Apple, Xiaomi, Garmin, and Samsung in that order. Xiaomi in particular showed tremendous interest in the sector with a YoY growth of 951.8 percent. The Chinese manufacturer had shipped just 1.1 million units in 2014 to over 12 million by the end of 2015. Samsung, Garmin, and Fitbit dropped in market share despite their greater shipments YoY.

In comparison, the notebook market was stagnant throughout all of 2015 and is not expected to show significant growth for the rest of 2016.

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 02 > Wearables market up 172 percent thanks to fitness trackers and the Apple Watch
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-02-26 (Update: 2016-02-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.