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We test out Nvidia DLSS on the Razer Blade 15 and results are impressive

We test out Nvidia DLSS on the Razer Blade 15 and results are impressive (Image source: 3DMark)
We test out Nvidia DLSS on the Razer Blade 15 and results are impressive (Image source: 3DMark)
A 47 percent boost in performance with no loss in image quality seems almost too good to be true. Nvidia DLSS puts deep learning and AI to good use for gamers who may not yet be sold on the capabilities of ray-tracing.

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Nvidia's latest GeForce driver (418.81) enables Deep Learning supersampling (DLSS) for its RTX Turing graphics cards as detailed on the official changelog here. The proprietary technique makes supersampling – a traditionally effective but computationally demanding anti-aliasing method – easier on the hardware by utilizing AI and the GPU's tensor cores. It would essentially run games at a lower resolution for faster performance and then supersample the image based on Nvidia-patented deep learning rendering techniques. Nvidia is advertising a performance boost of up to 50 percent when DLSS is enabled with better image quality than the common temporal anti-aliasing (TAA).

As a proof of concept, the green chipmaker has teamed up with 3DMark to create a benchmark based on Port Royal to showcase DLSS in action. To run it, however, requires a GeForce RTX GPU on 418.81 or later, Windows 10 on the October 2018 Update (1809) or later, and 3DMark Professional Edition. The official 3DMark video below compares TAA to DLSS to show both faster performance and better image quality with DLSS.

We decided to give the new benchmark a spin on the new Razer Blade 15 with GeForce RTX 2070 Max-Q graphics. As our screenshots show below, average frame rates with and without DLSS sit at 25.15 FPS and 17.16 FPS, respectively, for a performance boost of 47 percent. If similar performance deltas can be observed on the RTX 2060 and RTX 2080, then we can see DLSS being a fan-favorite when it comes to anti-aliasing especially if image quality remains comparable or better than TAA.

Of course, 3DMark benchmarks are often best-case scenarios and so we shouldn't expect a 47 percent performance boost in real-world titles. Additionally, a distinct limitation of DLSS is that its implementation in games requires direct cooperation between the developers and Nvidia whereas standard supersampling can be enabled on almost any 3D title. The technology will likely make its way to triple-A games from giant publishers first and forego most older titles.

Blade 15 RTX 2070 Max-Q results with DLSS on and off
Blade 15 RTX 2070 Max-Q results with DLSS on and off
Frame rates are noticeably higher across the board with DLSS active
Frame rates are noticeably higher across the board with DLSS active

Source(s)

3DMark

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 02 > We test out Nvidia DLSS on the Razer Blade 15 and results are impressive
Allen Ngo, 2019-02- 5 (Update: 2019-02- 5)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.