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The Lenovo Thinkbook 15 Gen2 now has a hidden compartment to store Bluetooth earbuds for video conferencing

The Intel version of the ThinkBook 15 Gen2 has a compartment on the side to hold a pair of Bluetooth earbuds for video conferencing. (Source: Lenovo)
The Intel version of the ThinkBook 15 Gen2 has a compartment on the side to hold a pair of Bluetooth earbuds for video conferencing. (Source: Lenovo)
Lenovo pivots the ThinkBook 15 Gen2 into the 'work from home' market with a novel new feature that significantly improves its versatility as a video conferencing device.
Craig Ward,

Lenovo has refreshed the 13-inch, 14-inch, and 15-inch versions of their small-business orientated ThinkBook line. One of the standout changes in the lineup sits with the ThinkBook 15 Gen2, which now features a unique slot for a pair of integrated Bluetooth earbuds. The earbuds are of the long-stemmed variety which brings the microphone closer to the user's mouth and can allow for better audio pickup when talking.

They have a two-hour battery life at 70% (and charge when stored), but the design uses silicon tips that fit into the ear, so most users will likely find they can get away with a lower volume level. The earbuds are only available on select Intel models from November 2020 onwards and aren't an option with the AMD models.

The processor choices have been updated to use Intel's 11th Gen U-series Tiger Lake chips of either i5 or i7 denomination. Graphics workloads are handled by either the regular UHD620 in lower-spec models or Iris Xe in more powerful models. Those in need of stronger GPU acceleration can choose an Nvidia MX450. The AMD version uses Ryzen 4000 U-series processors with integrated Radeon graphics.

Storage can be installed in two different ways. Those who need larger amounts of cheap storage can choose to have a single PCIe M.2 slot and a 2.5-inch drive bay that can handle cheaper SATA SSD or large hard drives. If drive speed is more important — or the user isn't concerned with the price — the 2.5-inch drive bay can be skipped to give the space needed to install another PCIe drive.

The battery capacities on offer are 45 Wh and 60 Wh for approximately six hours and eight hours respectively. Those runtimes would be reduced if there was a mechanical hard drive installed or if the Nvidia MX450 was installed. The AMD version is rated for longer battery runtimes at 7.5 hours and 10 hours respectively.

The FullHD display comes in four different varieties. A TN panel (avoid), a basic IPS panel (ok for office work, otherwise avoid), a standard IPS panel that meets 100% sRGB, and an eye-saver IPS panel that meets TÜV Rheinland low blue light certification.

Rounding out the options is a fingerprint reader, a ThinkShutter for webcam privacy, 2x2 WiFi 5 or WiFi 6, Thunderbolt 4 (Intel only), USB-C with DisplayPort and power delivery, 2 x USB3, HDMI, SD card reader, RJ45 LAN, and a headphone jack. Dimensions are 357 (W) x 235 (D) x 18.9 (H) mm and 1.7 kg.

The ThinkBook 15 Gen2 will be available from October 2020, starting at US$549 (AMD) or US$569 (Intel). Models with the integrated earbuds won't be available until November 2020.

Lenovo ThinkBook 15 Gen2 left side port selection. (Source: Lenovo)
Lenovo ThinkBook 15 Gen2 left side port selection. (Source: Lenovo)
Lenovo ThinkBook 15 Gen2 right side port selection. (Source: Lenovo)
Lenovo ThinkBook 15 Gen2 right side port selection. (Source: Lenovo)

Source(s)

Lenovo Press Material

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 09 > The Lenovo Thinkbook 15 Gen2 now has a hidden compartment to store Bluetooth earbuds for video conferencing
Craig Ward, 2020-09-29 (Update: 2020-09-27)
Craig Ward
Craig Ward - News Editor
I grew up in a family surrounded by technology, starting with my father loading up games for me on a Commodore 64, and later on a 486. In the late 90's and early 00's I started learning how to tinker with Windows, while also playing around with Linux distributions, both of which gave me an interest for learning how to make software do what you want it to do, and modifying settings that aren't normally user accessible. After this I started building my own computers, and tearing laptops apart, which gave me an insight into hardware and how it works in a complete system. Now keeping up with the latest in hardware and software news is a passion of mine.