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Tablets predicted to face declining sales through 2021

Tablets predicted to face declining sales through 2021
Tablets predicted to face declining sales through 2021
The saturation of cheap white label tablets from lesser-known brands will cause more users to turn to major brand names for future purchases.

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Worldwide shipments of tablets are declining according to the latest figures from market researchers at IDC. According to the source, worldwide shipments were down double-digit percentages by the end of 2015. Meanwhile, tablet alternatives like detachables and convertibles have been slowly rising in sales.

The latest forecast from ABI Research is predicting that the slow sales of tablets will continue for at least the next several years. Shipments are expected to fall from 207 million in 2015 to less than 140 million by 2021. In particular, the firm believes that name brand models will eat up more of the market share while cheaper white label alternatives will decline.

As of 2015, data from ABI Research shows that branded tablets make up just over two-thirds of worldwide sales. This is expected to rise to 70.6 percent by the end of 2016 and finally to 88.5 percent by the end of 2021. Thus, smaller and lesser-known tablet brands will slowly fade as fewer and larger manufacturers eat up most of the market.

Outside of tablets, laptop shipments have also been on the decline and are not expected to recover this year. Smartphones sales are experiencing a slight uptick due in part to the increasing availability of inexpensive models in developing regions.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 03 > Tablets predicted to face declining sales through 2021
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-03-29 (Update: 2016-03-29)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.