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Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge LED cases spotted at FCC

Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge LED cases spotted at FCC
Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge LED cases spotted at FCC
The flagship Galaxy S of 2016 is very well on its way to an official announcement if these documents are anything to go by.

In the U.S., the FCC is apparently deep into its certification process for the supposed Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge. More specifically, the regulatory agency has registered two LED Cover View cases for the Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge as the model names EF-NG935 and EF-NG930.

The two model numbers match up nicely with the still unconfirmed SM-G930 and SM-G935 model numbers for the S7 and S7 Edge, respectively. For comparison, the current Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge carry the model numbers SM-G920 and SM-G925, respectively.

The Cover View cases join the existing Clearview covers and flip wallet covers for the next generation Galaxy S smartphones that have popped up on numerous occasions leading up to CES. While Samsung has made official announcements on the upcoming Galaxy A and Galaxy J series, its star Galaxy S series is still under wraps. An official word on the inevitable 2016 refresh will likely come this MWC in Barcelona, Spain.

Samsung remains one of the largest smartphone manufacturers in the world in sheer shipment numbers according to the most recent rankings by multiple market analysts.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 01 > Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge LED cases spotted at FCC
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-01-19 (Update: 2016-01-19)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.