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Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge may come in Silver or Gray color options

Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge may come in Silver or Gray color options
Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge may come in Silver or Gray color options
After numerous leaks of the Galaxy S7, it's now time for the Galaxy S7 Edge to make an unofficial appearance. Previous rumors showed the device in Gold only.

The leaks continue to pour in on Samsung's upcoming Galaxy S7 series. This time, however, the S7 Edge gets its turn in a series of photos showing the final design of the smartphone.

Twitter account @Evleaks has posted the low quality and resolution images showing the curvy Silver Gray smartphone. No other information has been provided other than the images themselves, so users are left speculating on the glossy case and features.

Existing rumors claim that the Galaxy S7 Edge would be available in Gold and Black, but this latest leak suggests a third Silver color as well. Other colors like Green, Blue, or Pink have not been spotted for the Galaxy S7 Edge. Samsung's next flagship smartphones are expected to be unveiled at MWC 2016 this coming February 21st as part of the Samsung Galaxy Unpacked event. At the heart of the new series should be the recently announced octa-core Exynos 8890 SoC while certain regions may receive models with the Snapdragon 820 SoC instead.

The fate of the "Plus" version of the Galaxy S7 Edge has been put into question. The Galaxy S6 Plus and S6 Edge Plus launched not half a year later after the original models.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 02 > Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge may come in Silver or Gray color options
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-02-11 (Update: 2016-02-12)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.