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PS5 DualSense Controller can play Forza Horizon 4 via Microsoft xCloud on a Pixel 5, teardown reveals a 1,560 mAh battery

The PlayStation 5 DualSense controller seems to work with PC and Android devices as well. (Image Source: PlayStation)
The PlayStation 5 DualSense controller seems to work with PC and Android devices as well. (Image Source: PlayStation)
The official unboxing embargo of the PlayStation 5 lifts today, but YouTuber Austin Evans got an early feel for the console's DualSense controller. While the actual PS5 demo is still some time away, Evans could pair the DualSense controller to a Surface Laptop Go and a Pixel 5. He could also game on the Pixel 5 using this controller via Microsoft xCloud. Teardown of the DualSense controller revealed a 1,560 mAh battery among other cool hardware.

Though the PlayStation 5 (PS5)'s unboxing embargo lifts today, we won't be getting to see the console in action till probably November 6. So far, all media could only disclose that they have received the console and not open the product packaging itself to show what's inside.

While the actual console reviews will have to wait, YouTuber Austin Evans has posted an unboxing and teardown of the PS5's DualSense controller. Not just that, he also showed that the controller can work with PCs and Android devices too even though this feature is not explicitly stated in the documentation.

Evans takes a tour of the DualSense controller showing off the D-pad, the standard face buttons, the dedicated PlayStation button, a button for muting the headset/mic, the touchpad, two analog thumb sticks, four trigger buttons, and the USB-C port. He does note that there is no USB-C cable supplied in the box, though.

Since the PS5 itself cannot be demoed right now, Evans tried connecting the DualSense controller to other devices such as the Xbox Series X, PlayStation 4 (PS4) Pro, Surface Laptop Go, and the Google Pixel 5.

The DualSense didn't work when connected to an Xbox Series X (for obvious reasons) though it did help with charging. The PlayStation 4 could pickup the microphone sounds when connected to the DualSense but that was about it. Though the controller could pair with the PS4 Pro via Bluetooth, it really couldn't do anything else.

Interestingly, the DualSense paired easily with a Surface Laptop Go in wired mode and most functions seemed to work pretty responsively. The controller could also connect to the Google Pixel 5 wirelessly and navigate the homescreen. In fact, Evans was able to play Forza Horizon 4 via Microsoft xCloud on the Pixel using the DualSense controller. Understandably, functions such as the vibration and haptic feedback do not work with these devices. That being said, Evans seems to have had a pretty good experience in using the DualSense with these devices.

Finally, Evans proceeds to do a teardown of the controller. A neat aesthetic touch that was revealed is the presence of tiny bumpy texturing on the back of the controller that are miniature versions of the PlayStation's triangle, square, circle, and cross face buttons.

After finally managing to take the shell apart (for science, of course), Evans notes the huge rumble motors, impulse triggers, dual microphones, the speaker, and the 1,560 mAh battery.

Overall, it looks like Sony has managed to pack a lot of tech under the DualSense controller's hood for US$70. It will be interesting to see how the new PS5-exclusive functions work once the final console reviews are out.

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The PS5 DualSense controller sports a 1,560 mAh battery. (Image Source: Austin Evans on YouTube)
The PS5 DualSense controller sports a 1,560 mAh battery. (Image Source: Austin Evans on YouTube)
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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 10 > PS5 DualSense Controller can play Forza Horizon 4 via Microsoft xCloud on a Pixel 5, teardown reveals a 1,560 mAh battery
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2020-10-27 (Update: 2020-10-27)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.