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Microsoft recalling power cords for Surface Pro, Surface Pro 2, and Surface Pro 3

Microsoft recalling power cords for Surface Pro, Surface Pro 2, and Surface Pro 3
Microsoft recalling power cords for Surface Pro, Surface Pro 2, and Surface Pro 3
Purchases made prior to July 15, 2015 may be affected by the recall due to overheating and unintended damage.

Microsoft has issued a global and voluntary recall on official AC power cords for the Surface Pro, Surface Pro 2, and Surface Pro 3 family of tablets. These cables have been found to overheat as a result of damage done to the cords from repeated bending, twisting, and coiling. All new purchases made before July 15, 2015 are affected by the recall.

Signs of damage include cracks, wear, and bugles around the charging end of the cable. Nonetheless, Microsoft suggests that all owners of any of the Surface Pro devices mentioned above should request a free replacement power cord.

The Redmond company has provided a handy webpage detailing the recall and how customers should respond. Fortunately, none of the power cords for the Surface Pro 4 or Surface Book are affected. Additionally, power cables and adapters designed specifically for Surface accessories and docking stations are not affected by the recall.

The Surface Pro series of tablets has been Microsoft's poster child for Windows mobile. The newer models in particular consistently rank as one of the best Windows tablets available.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 01 > Microsoft recalling power cords for Surface Pro, Surface Pro 2, and Surface Pro 3
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-01-22 (Update: 2016-01-22)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.