Notebookcheck

Microsoft could unveil Lumia 750 and 850 at MWC 2016

Microsoft could unveil Lumia 750 and 850 at MWC 2016
Microsoft could unveil Lumia 750 and 850 at MWC 2016
New leak shows a possible Lumia 750 or 850 passing more wireless certifications.

Rumors of a new Lumia smartphone came about early last month when the device passed Indonesian certification. Now, the same RM-1182 model number has shown up again under certification for use in China. The device could very well be the Lumia 750 or 850, the latter of which leaked numerous times before the end of last year.

If the source proves to be true, then the RM-1182 should be coming to the China Unicom network. Unfortunately, there is still no mention of the official retail name of the device or any hard specifications other than the lack of fast-charging support.

The rumored Lumia 750 or 850 is expected to carry a Qualcomm Snapdragon 617 SoC, 2 GB RAM, 5.5-inch or 5.8-inch FHD display, and at least 16 GB of internal storage space with Windows 10 Mobile. The timing of the leaked certifications and render images suggests an official reveal sooner rather than later with the Mobile World Conference being a likely time frame.

The updated mainstream Lumia lineup follows after the official announcement of the flagship Lumia 950 and 950 XL earlier last year.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Especially English native speakers welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Quelle(n)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 01 > Microsoft could unveil Lumia 750 and 850 at MWC 2016
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-01-15 (Update: 2016-01-15)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.