Notebookcheck

Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Yoga with OLED panel now available

X1 Yoga: WQHD OLED (left) vs. FHD IPS (right)
X1 Yoga: WQHD OLED (left) vs. FHD IPS (right)
The configuration was originally announced with an April launch date, but is now finally available for about 2569 Euros.

The 14-inch ThinkPad X1 Yoga was announced at CES 2016 with a WQHD OLED panel manufactured by Samsung. This not only makes it the first ThinkPad with an OLED option, but also the first 14-inch OLED consumer notebook altogether. Lenovo launched the ThinkPad X1 Yoga without the option earlier this year and has only recently made the OLED option available.

The option will cost a pretty penny with a starting price of about 2569 Euros. This will net users the OLED panel, Core i7-6500U CPU, 8 GB RAM, and 256 GB SSD. The more expensive configuration includes the Core i7-6600U, 16 GB RAM, and 1 TB PCIe SSD for 3300 Euros. Students with eligible discounts, however, can get this exact configuration for only around 2500 Euros. WiGig is not an option with the OLED panel.

In our review of the X1 Yoga, we criticized its battery life, backlight bleeding, and high starting price even without the OLED panel. Lenovo is advertising its OLED panel with 97 percent AdobeRGB coverage. We already have the SKU under review, so check back soon for our full take on the panel.

Aside from Lenovo, Dell has also recently made available the Alienware 13 with an OLED option.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Indian citizens welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Source(s)

Read all 1 comments / answer
static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 07 > Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Yoga with OLED panel now available
Benjamin Herzig/ Allen Ngo, 2016-07- 6 (Update: 2019-04-30)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.