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LG to invest more heavily on OLED production

LG to increase R&D on OLED production
LG to increase R&D on OLED production
The South Korean manufacturer will throw another 1.75 billion USD in OLED manufacturing.

OLED is currently a hot topic in display development and production. Samsung recently made clear that it will focus on OLED technology as standard LCD panels have become too common and ubiquitous in an already crowded smartphone and TV market. Thus, it's no surprise that other major manufacturers like LG have announced similar OLED investments for future smartphones and tablets. Now, the South Korean company will purportedly fund another 1.75 billion USD on top of its current investments in the field.

It has been speculated that Apple's near-future OLED demands have been pushing display manufacturers to mass produce OLED panels sooner rather than later. Next year's iPhone is expected to be the company's first OLED-equipped smartphone and both LG and Samsung may be the two largest suppliers of said panel. The technology has been around for quite some time for TVs and even on early versions of the Playstation Vita, but has only recently found its way onto notebooks like the Alienware 13 and ThinkPad X1 Carbon. Prices remain prohibitively expensive and continue to be a major hurdle in mainstream adoption.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 08 > LG to invest more heavily on OLED production
Benjamin Herzig/ Allen Ngo, 2016-08- 2 (Update: 2016-08- 2)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.