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Dell Alienware 13 R2 with OLED now available in North America

Dell Alienware 13 R2 with OLED now available in North America
Dell Alienware 13 R2 with OLED now available in North America
The $1299 USD 13-inch gaming notebook can now be configured with a QHD OLED touchscreen capable of a contrast ratio of 100000:1 and a response time of just 1 ms.

OLED displays are relatively niche in the notebook market. While Dell first teased the Alienware 13 OLED at this year's CES, a couple of manufacturers including Lenovo and HP have the 14-inch ThinkPad X1 Yoga and 13-inch Spectre 13, respectively, with OLED QHD panel options. The Lenovo OLED notebook is not yet available whereas the HP is currently in market.

Unlike Lenovo or HP, however, Dell will be equipping a gaming notebook with a OLED QHD panel. The manufacturer is claiming a contrast ratio of 100000:1 and a response time of just 1 ms to be the fastest response time of all Alienware devices to date. Interestingly, Dell is saying that its OLED panels must have a glass overlay and will therefore be touchscreens by default on the Alienware 13.

The Alienware 13 R2 OLED retails in North America for $1299 USD. An official launch overseas has not yet been announced. See our previous review on the Alienware 13 R2 for more information and benchmarks on the gaming notebook.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 06 > Dell Alienware 13 R2 with OLED now available in North America
Benjamin Herzig/ Allen Ngo, 2016-06-19 (Update: 2016-06-19)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.