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Xiaomi launches budget Redmi 3s smartphone

Xiaomi unveils budget Redmi 3s smartphone
Xiaomi unveils budget Redmi 3s smartphone
The 5-inch Redmi 3s will ship with a 720p display, Snapdragon 430 SoC, and 2 GB or 3 GB of RAM starting at 699 Yuan or about 100 Euros.

Xiaomi devices are available almost exclusively as imports in most regions around the world despite being one of the largest smartphone manufacturers in the world in terms of worldwide shipment numbers.

Now, Xiaomi is ready to bring another mainstream offering to market with the Redmi 3s. Specifications include:

  • 5-inch 720p IPS display
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 430 SoC
  • 2 GB RAM
  • 16 GB eMMC w/ MicroSD support
  • Android w/ MIUI 7 software
  • 4100 mAh battery
  • 13 MP rear + 5 MP front cameras
  • Dual SIM, USB OTG
  • FM radio receiver, Bluetooth 4.1, IR port

A second SKU will also be made available with 3 GB RAM and 32 GB eMMC, but both devices are otherwise identical. Note that the Redmi 3s will not support LTE band 20, which is the most common LTE band for European regions.

The 2 GB and 3 GB versions are now available in China for 699 Yuan and 899 Yuan, respectively, or about 100 Euros and 125 Euros. The price-to-performance ratio is very good considering the size and hardware so long as international buyers are aware that return services will likely be very slow.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 06 > Xiaomi launches budget Redmi 3s smartphone
Florian Wimmer/ Allen Ngo, 2016-06-19 (Update: 2016-06-19)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.