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TENAA documents suggest a Xiaomi Redmi 3 successor

TENAA documents suggest a Xiaomi Redmi 3 successor
TENAA documents suggest a Xiaomi Redmi 3 successor
Xiaomi may be gearing up for a 2016 refresh of its Redmi and Redmi Note offerings with new 5-inch and 5.5-inch options.

Two new entries in the TENAA database are looking to be successors to the recent Xiaomi Redmi 3 smartphone. One model will have a 5-inch display while the other a 5.5-inch one, both with fingerprint sensors on the back, MicroSD slots, LTE, and the usual GPS, Bluetooth, WiFi, and FM radio specifications.

The smaller of the two will likely be the direct successor to the Redmi 3 based on its HD display resolution, unspecified 1.4 GHz octa-core SoC (possibly a Snapdragon 415), 2 GB RAM, and 16 GB internal storage. This mainstream model is expected to use a metal or metallic casing in silver or gold with dimensions of 139.3 x 69.6 x 8.5 mm, a weight of 143 g, 13 MP rear and 8 MP front cameras, and a 2850 mAh battery pack.

Meanwhile, the more capable and larger 5.5-inch model will bring a 1080p display, a 1.8 GHz hexa-core SoC (possibly from the Snapdragon 650 series), 2 GB RAM, 16 GB eMMC, 149.96 x 76.06 x 8.69 mm dimensions, 166 g weight, 16 MP rear and 5 MP front cameras, and a slightly larger 4000 mAh battery. Like the existing Redmi 3 and its smaller sibling above, silver and gold are expected to be color options.

Official launch dates are currently unknown for these new mainstream models.

Dieses Modell bietet einen 5,5 Zoll Bildschirm und wird vermutlich der Nachfolger des Redmi Note 3
Dieses Modell bietet einen 5,5 Zoll Bildschirm und wird vermutlich der Nachfolger des Redmi Note 3

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 05 > TENAA documents suggest a Xiaomi Redmi 3 successor
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-05-30 (Update: 2016-05-30)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.