Notebookcheck

Galaxy Note 5 successor could be the Galaxy Note 7

Galaxy Note 5 successor could be the Galaxy Note 7
Galaxy Note 5 successor could be the Galaxy Note 7
Samsung may be skipping the Galaxy Note 6 name altogether while adding curved glass to all four edges of the front of the unannounced device.

Skipping and jumping around numbers for smartphones is uncommon, but it happens nonetheless. Axon, for example, will launch the Axon 7 as the direct successor to the Axon 2. The numbering system may not make sense sequentially, but the higher number will have a psychological effect on many everyday consumers as they will see the flagship Axon 7 on a more level playing field against the iPhone 6 or Galaxy S7 without first comparing specifications.

Now, a new report from GSMArena claims that Samsung will be doing the same with its Galaxy Note series. The current Galaxy Note 5 may be succeeded directly by the Galaxy Note 7 to put the series in line with the Galaxy S7 series. The report also claims that Samsung will have curved glass on all four edges of the front side instead of just two, though it remains to be seen if a standard traditional model will be made available as well. Recent rumors point to a family of Galaxy Note models including a Galaxy Note Light and a higher-end version with 6 GB RAM and a 5.8-inch QHD display.

The processor is expected to be either the Exynos 8890 again or the rumored Snapdragon 823 SoC, which may simply be a modified Snapdragon 820 designed to run at even faster clock rates. Judging by past releases, an August launch time frame is still a possibility for the Note 5 successor(s).

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 05 > Galaxy Note 5 successor could be the Galaxy Note 7
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-05-30 (Update: 2016-05-31)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.