Notebookcheck

Dell to use recycled carbon fiber for future Alienware and Latitude notebooks

Dell to use recycled carbon fiber for future Alienware and Latitude notebooks
Dell to use recycled carbon fiber for future Alienware and Latitude notebooks
The manufacturer plans to significantly increase its use of recycled materials for new products.

"Going Green" is probably one of the better ways to improve public perception and the use of recycled material to create new products is a common strategy in the industry. Dell has announced that the manufacturer will be collaborating with SABIC starting late 2015 for supplying excess carbon fiber and other raw materials for use on select Dell product ranges. SABIC is a global supplier of thermoplastics and the new deal will reclaim approximately 820,000 pounds of carbon fiber plastic that would have otherwise been sent to landfills.

The re-processed CFRPs are expected to make it into new Latitude and Alienware models manufactured towards the end of the year. These notebooks already use high quality plastics, Aluminum alloys, and rubberized surfaces as these are high-end business and gaming devices.

Dell boasts that its existing plastic recycling program has already recycled more than 4.2 million pounds of plastic as of January 2014 by incorporating it into more than 30 models including the Dell OptiPlex desktops.

We are always looking for collaborations that bring efficiencies to our business, and help our customers do the same.”, says Dell VP Trisa Thompson in the press release. The manufacturer was able to reduce its carbon footprint by 11 percent via its plastic recycling program and is hoping to achieve something similar with SABIC.

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 09 > Dell to use recycled carbon fiber for future Alienware and Latitude notebooks
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-09-29 (Update: 2015-09-29)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.