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Dell XPS 13 and Asus UX303 to get Core i7-6500U Skylake updates

Dell XPS 13 and Asus UX303 to get Core i7-6500U Skylake updates
Dell XPS 13 and Asus UX303 to get Core i7-6500U Skylake updates
Intel Skylake is finally rolling in as several online retailers are already listing notebooks with the next generation Intel CPU.

More and more notebooks with Intel's next generation lineup of mobile processors are being listed by retailers. The first mobile Skylake processors are expected to come this September and the Core i3-6100U, i5-6200U, and i7-6500U are rumored to be the first available.

So far, retailer listings of the Dell XPS 13 and Asus ZenBook UX303 can be found with the higher-end Core i7-6500U CPU. The Asus model in particular is listed as UX303UB-R4021T-BE with 8 GB RAM, 256 GB SSD, and a 13.3-inch FHD display for roughly 1200 Euros.

Meanwhile, the Dell equivalent will sport a higher resolution 13.3-inch QHD (3200 x 1880) display in addition to USB 3.1 and Thunderbolt 3. Otherwise, core specifications remain identical including the Core i7 Skylake processor, 8 GB RAM, and 256 GB SSD according to one online retailer based in Mexico. Both the Dell and Asus are expected to be internal updates only with just slight tweaks to the chassis.

We fully expect to hear more about more Skylake notebooks in the coming weeks especially with IFA 2015 around the corner.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 08 > Dell XPS 13 and Asus UX303 to get Core i7-6500U Skylake updates
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-08-26 (Update: 2015-08-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.