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Latest HP Spectre 15 x360 redesign drops Kaby Lake-G in favor of the GeForce GTX 1050 Ti Max-Q

Latest HP Spectre 15 x360 redesign drops Kaby Lake-G in favor of the GeForce GTX 1050 Ti Max-Q (Source: HP)
Latest HP Spectre 15 x360 redesign drops Kaby Lake-G in favor of the GeForce GTX 1050 Ti Max-Q (Source: HP)
Talk about a short life cycle. While Kaby Lake-G is nowhere to be found, the chassis has been updated with even narrower bezels (5.55 mm vs. 6.3 mm) and a visually unique 45-degree USB Type-C port. A new configuration with an Intel Coffee Lake-H CPU and GTX 1050 Ti Max-Q graphics will supplant the experimental Core i7-8705G CPU and Radeon RX Vega M GL GPU configuration released earlier this year.

Alongside the fifth generation Spectre 13 x360, HP will also be launching a refreshed Spectre 15 x360 to close out the year. The redesigned system shares many of the same physical features as the aforementioned Spectre 13 x360 including the physical camera switch, 45-degree Power button and USB-C port, and re-positioned fingerprint reader. We recommend checking out our page on the new Spectre 13 x360 for more information.

The more interesting aspects of the upcoming Spectre 15 x360 are all under the hood. Whereas the current Spectre 15 x360 model is limited to the 15 W Kaby Lake-R Core i7-8550U or 65 W Kaby Lake-G Core i7-8705G, the upcoming refresh will have 15 W Whiskey Lake i7-8565U or hexa-core 45 W Coffee Lake-H i7-8750H options. In other words, it appears that HP will be dropping Kaby Lake-G altogether for more traditional Intel options.

As for the graphics side, the GeForce MX150 will remain with a new option for the faster GeForce GTX 1050 Ti Max-Q. This latter GPU will quietly replace the Radeon RX Vega M GL on the bygone Kaby Lake-G SKU while offering a very similar level of performance. Truth be told, the Nvidia GPU will likely have more consistent performance when gaming with fewer compatibility issues than the very rare Radeon RX Vega M GL.

To cope with the new processors, the new design will incorporate larger twin fans and a third heat pipe. It is unknown for now if the improved cooling will only be for the Coffee Lake-H SKUs or if it will also be in the less demanding Whiskey Lake SKUs.

The HP Spectre 15 x360 Whiskey Lake SKUs will begin shipping this December for a starting price of $1390 USD. Users who want the more powerful Coffee Lake-H and GTX 1050 Ti Max-Q option will likely have to wait until early next year because of its staggered launch.

Spectre x360 15 (Early 2018)Spectre x360 15 (Late 2018)
CPUCore i7-8550U or Core i7-8705GCore i7-8565U or Core i7-8750H
GPUGeForce MX150 or Radeon RX Vega M GLGeForce MX150 or GeForce GTX 1050 Ti Max-Q
Display4K UHD touchscreen4K UHD touchscreen, 650 nits
RAMUp to 16 GB DDR4 (2x SODIMM)Up to 16 GB DDR4 (2x SODIMM)
Ports1x Thunderbolt 3 (or 2x depending on SKU), USB Type-C, USB Type-A, HDMI, SD reader, 3.5 mm combo audio1x Thunderbolt 3, USB Type-C, HDMI 2.0, MicroSD reader, 3.5 mm combo audio
Dimensions19.3 x 359 x 250 mm19.3 x 361.2 x 250 mm
Weight, BatteryStarting at 2.08 kg, 84 WhStarting at 2.17 kg, 84 Wh

 

 

 

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(Source: HP)
(Source: HP)
(Source: HP)
(Source: HP)

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2018 10 > Latest HP Spectre 15 x360 redesign drops Kaby Lake-G in favor of the GeForce GTX 1050 Ti Max-Q
Allen Ngo, 2018-10-23 (Update: 2018-10-16)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.