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HP claims the sleek new EliteOne 800 G6 is the most powerful commercial All-in-One

HP says that the EliteOne 800 G6 is the most powerful commercial All-in-One available. (Source: HP)
HP says that the EliteOne 800 G6 is the most powerful commercial All-in-One available. (Source: HP)
The refreshed HP EliteOne 800 G6, available in 23.8-inch and 27-inch models, features an Intel 10th gen i9 processor and Nvidia RTX graphics making it a very capable All-in-One rolled into an attractive package. Although the EliteOne 800 G6 is aimed at business use, it could make a suitable family PC for gaming in the living area.
Craig Ward,

While many consumers appreciate the compact design of an All-in-One desktop computer, most are low-powered devices that offer little more than a small price advantage for desk-bound users. But that hasn’t stopped manufacturers creating more capable options with dedicated GPUs to offer Windows-based alternatives to the iMac and iMac Pro, such as the HP Envy AiO or Microsoft Surface Studio 2.

This is where the refreshed HP EliteOne 800 G6 comes into play, with its new sleek styling and upgraded internals. Available in both 23.8-inch and 27-inch models, it features Intel 10th Gen processors (up to Core i9), up to 64 GB DDR4 RAM (2666 MHz or 3200 MHz), and various NVMe M.2 drives in capacities up to 2 TB. The smaller display is only available in FHD (1080p), but the larger is configurable with FHD or QHD (1440p). Both screen sizes have touchscreen options.

There are versions with onboard graphics only or an entry-level AMD RX 5300M for more basic use, but the attention-grabbing option is the Nvidia RTX 2070 Super. HP’s ‘Elite’ range of products is undoubtedly business-focused, both in marketing and feature set (e.g. Intel vPro). However, this RTX option gives it some serious chops for GPU accelerated video editing/exporting or niche applications such as client demonstration VR.

Gaming isn’t something that HP actively promotes for the EliteOne 800 G6, but this would actually be a compelling use case. All-in-One computers fit well with the idea of keeping the family PC in the main living areas due to smaller footprints and more eye-pleasing designs. The EliteOne 800 G6 is an attractive option that keeps the gamers in the family present with everyone else. In lieu of any testing, we do need to point out that All-in-One systems with top-end components can struggle to keep temperatures down and there is a higher risk of thermal throttling than in a traditional tower case.

I/O contains a pleasing mix of USB-A and USB-C, RJ45 LAN, DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 2.0a, headphone/mic combo, and a 5-in-1 card reader. A webcam and IR camera (for Windows Hello) pops up above the screen on certain models. There is no Thunderbolt 3 port, which is a shame since this would allow users to extend useable life by connecting an external GPU dock a few years after the original purchase or upgrade a model without dGPU at a later point. Fortunately, HP has made the HDMI port capable of acting as an input, meaning that the EliteOne can act as a monitor once it is no longer desirable as a computer.

The HP EliteOne 800 G6 is currently slated for a September 2020 release with MSRP starting at US$1249.

Side profile of the HP EliteOne 800 G6 27-inch. (Source: HP)
Side profile of the HP EliteOne 800 G6 27-inch. (Source: HP)
Rear view of the HP EliteOne 800 G6 24-inch. (Source: HP)
Rear view of the HP EliteOne 800 G6 24-inch. (Source: HP)

Source(s)

HP Press Material

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 05 > HP claims the sleek new EliteOne 800 G6 is the most powerful commercial All-in-One
Craig Ward, 2020-05-26 (Update: 2020-05-25)
Craig Ward
Craig Ward - News Editor
I grew up in a family surrounded by technology, starting with my father loading up games for me on a Commodore 64, and later on a 486. In the late 90's and early 00's I started learning how to tinker with Windows, while also playing around with Linux distributions, both of which gave me an interest for learning how to make software do what you want it to do, and modifying settings that aren't normally user accessible. After this I started building my own computers, and tearing laptops apart, which gave me an insight into hardware and how it works in a complete system. Now keeping up with the latest in hardware and software news is a passion of mine.