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Contrary to previous reports, Crytek developer feels the PlayStation 5 can sustain its 10.3 TFLOPs better and is easier to develop for than the Xbox Series X

Crytek developer feels coding for the PS5 is easier than the Xbox Series X. (Image Source: LetsGoDigital)
Crytek developer feels coding for the PS5 is easier than the Xbox Series X. (Image Source: LetsGoDigital)
A Crytek developer by the name of Ali Salehi has opined in an interview to a Persian gaming site that developing for the PlayStation 5 is easier than the Xbox Series X. He also said that the Xbox's higher TFLOP advantage is only applicable in ideal conditions and that the PS5 can better sustain peak performance.

Ever since Microsoft and Sony revealed the innards of their respective consoles, we have been seeing many discussions pertaining to the merits and demerits of their configurations. While the debate continues, a Crytek rendering engineer by the name of Ali Salehi opined that it is easier to develop for the PlayStation 5 (PS5) than the Xbox Series X. 

Salehi's interview was first published by the Persian gaming website Vigiato. The website later removed the interview and Salehi desisted from confirming its contents due to personal reasons. But this is the internet and everything is preserved for posterity. Wccftech carried a report of Salehi's interview translated by Twitter user @man4dead and this is what it says.

According to Salehi, though the Xbox Series X is the more powerful one on paper, it is easier to achieve peak performance with the PS5. He said, "Software-wise, coding for PS5 is extremely simple and has so many abilities that make the [developers] so free. In total, I can say PS5 is a better console." This is contrary to previous reports which indicated that PS5 devs "have no idea what to optimize for" and that "it cannot deliver the power you ask it to even in short bursts". 

Salehi also feels that hitting the 12 TFLOPs peak performance on the Xbox Series X will only be possible under ideal conditions if all components work at their peak efficiency. However, he feels that is not the case with the PS5, which will work at the 10.28 TFLOPs peak performance for the most part. PS5 Chief Architect Mark Cerny also drove home the point that TLOPs are not the only performance metric during the PS5 reveal last month.

Also, multiplatform developers will aim for the lowest common denominator in order to ensure more or less equal performance across consoles. The somewhat higher specs of the Xbox Series X should allow for more stable framerates at higher resolutions, though.

The exact differences when it comes to game development for the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X are unlikely to be revealed by multiplatform game studios. Looking at it from a PC perspective, Microsoft does seem to have the edge when it comes to the software given that the Xbox runs a modified version of Windows 10 with full support for DirectX 12 and Vulkan. The PS5 runs a custom OS but may offer a better toolset enabling deeper access to hardware and lower development turnaround time. 

While both the Xbox Series X and the PlayStation 5 are shaping to be drool-worthy offerings for gamers in terms of hardware, their actual success can only be ascertained once they start shipping and games become available. 

PS5 issues: Real or fake? (Image Source: Daniel Rubino on Twitter)
PS5 issues: Real or fake? (Image Source: Daniel Rubino on Twitter)

Source(s)

Vigiato (Persian, now removed) translated by @man4dead on Twitter (now deleted) via Wccftech

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 04 > Contrary to previous reports, Crytek developer feels the PlayStation 5 can sustain its 10.3 TFLOPs better and is easier to develop for than the Xbox Series X
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2020-04- 7 (Update: 2020-04- 7)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.