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Andromium Superbook will be a second display for both Windows and Macs

Andromium Superbook will be a second display for both Windows and Macs
Andromium Superbook will be a second display for both Windows and Macs
The Kickstarter campaign has met its goals to begin producing a notebook shell that can act as external displays for Windows PCs, Macs, and Android devices.

The Kickstarter campaign for the Andromium Superbook was a success with more than 16,000 supporters contributing almost $3 million USD total to develop a notebook shell that can not only double as a second display for Windows tablets and notebooks, but can also be used as a second larger display for a connected Android smartphone.

The Superbook connects to a Windows machine (like a Microsoft Surface Pro tablet) or PC stick via USB to operate as a second display as demonstrated by the video below. Mac users would also be able to connect seamlessly as well and, in the case of tablets and iPads, the keyboard and touchpad of the Superbook will work as inputs for the connected devices.

Multiple SKUs of the Superbook will be made available as the Kickstarter was able to meet its suggested stretch goals. This includes the $99 USD base model and a second SKU costing about $55 USD more with a 1080p panel, backlight keyboard, and additional USB port. Additional keyboard layouts for international consumers are also down the pipeline.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 08 > Andromium Superbook will be a second display for both Windows and Macs
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-08-23 (Update: 2016-08-23)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.