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ZOTAC announces compact ZOTAC GAMING GeForce GTX 1660 Ti and 1660 Ti AMP

Images via ZOTAC
Images via ZOTAC
UPDATE: Newegg has the ZOTAC GAMING GeForce GTX 1660 Ti and 1660 Ti AMP listed for US $279.99 and $289.99, respectively. The listings have detailed information on the cards' specifications. ZOTAC announced its take on the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Ti today in the form of two new graphics cards. The ZOTAC GAMING GeForce GTX 1660 Ti is a relatively compact card (145 mm or 5.71 inches) that ZOTAC claims can fit into 99% of systems available today. The ZOTAC GAMING GeForce GTX 1660 Ti AMP is a fair bit larger (209.6 mm or 8.3 inches) but has larger fans and will be factory overclocked. ZOTAC has yet to announce pricing and availability.

UPDATE: The ZOTAC GAMING GeForce GTX 1660 Ti AMP is listed on Newegg for US $289.99. The card is listed as having 6 GB of GDDR6 VRAM with a 192-bit bus, 1536 CUDA cores, and a Boost Clock of 1860 MHz. The standard GAMING GeForce GTX 1660 Ti is also listed on Newegg and priced at $279.99. The standard version shares the same VRAM and 1536 CUDA Cores, but its boost clock is only 1770 MHz.

ZOTAC is well known for its compact GPUs, and for good reason. The company makes some of the smallest GPUs on the market without sacrificing any power, which has been a godsend for Small Form Factor enthusiasts. The company announced today that it will be expanding its GPU lineup to include Nvidia’s new GeForce GTX 1660 Ti with two new SKUs, the ZOTAC GAMING GeForce GTX 1660 Ti and the ZOTAC GAMING GeForce GTX 1660 Ti AMP.

ZOTAC is mum on the exact specifications (e.g., clock speeds), but they did give us some details about the new GPUs. Both cards will feature GDDR6 VRAM like other 1660 Ti cards and will be equipped with an HDMI 2.0b and three DisplayPort 1.4 video outputs. Both cards should operate at a 120 Watt power envelope.

The real defining feature of both ZOTAC cards is their relatively compact footprints. The ZOTAC GAMING GeForce GTX 1660 Ti measures 145 mm (~5.71 inches) across; ZOTAC claims this card can “fit in 99% of systems available.” The AMP edition card is longer, measuring 209.6 mm (~8.3 inches) in order to accommodate larger fans to better cool the factory overclocked GPU.

Speaking of fans, the standard ZOTAC 1660 Ti will have dual offset fans (1x 70 mm, 1x 80 mm) to move heat from its full-length aluminum heatsink. The 70 mm fan “focuses on optimizing static pressure to increase airflow staying power” while the 80 mm fan is designed to deliver “maximum airflow,” according to ZOTAC. The AMP edition 1660 Ti has two 90 mm fans as a part of what ZOTAC is branding its “IceStorm 2.0” cooling system.

Early performance benchmarks for the 1660 Ti put it just above the Pascal-based GeForce GTX 1070, and the ZOTAC cards should perform about the same. The AMP edition will be factory overclocked by ZOTAC, so it should provide even better framerates.

Pricing and availability have yet to be announced. Based on expected MSRP, ZOTAC’s cards should fall somewhere in the US $250-300 range.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 02 > ZOTAC announces compact ZOTAC GAMING GeForce GTX 1660 Ti and 1660 Ti AMP
Sam Medley, 2019-02-22 (Update: 2019-02-22)
Sam Medley
Sam Medley - Review Editor - @samuel_medley
I've been a "tech-head" my entire life. After graduating college with a degree in Mathematics, I worked in finance and banking a few years before taking a job as a Systems Analyst for my local school district. I started working with Notebookcheck in October of 2016 and have enjoyed writing news articles and notebook reviews. My areas of interest include the business side of technology, retro gaming, Linux, and innovative gadgets. When I'm not hunched over an electronic device or writing code for a new database, I'm either outside with my family, playing a decade-old video game, or sitting behind a drum set.